DLP
The Risks of Sending Data to Your Personal Email
02 April 2019
Across all industries, people routinely send work from their corporate email account to their personal account to more easily work from home, or outside of office hours. On the surface, this may not pose any great threat to your organization, be it because your employees are careful, or because the data they handle isn’t sensitive enough. The main reason employees send work home is that it’s easier. Easier than accessing files through the corporate VPN, easier than digging out the randomly generated password to their work email for use at home, easier than printing off everything they need and taking it home with them. They send an email, go home, and the documents are ready and waiting. In earlier 2017, an airline employee sent a spreadsheet containing approximately 36,000 employee records home so his wife could help with a formatting problem. Based on data from the Ponemon Institute, this single spreadsheet may have cost the company as much as $5.7m. While bad practice, a security breach like this (because it doesn’t have to be damaging, or even publicized to constitute a breach) will most of the time not result in damage or require clean up, but the one time it does, the financial and reputation risk can be high. There is also the possibility that disgruntled employees may deliberately send information to their personal email to more easily disseminate it to competitors or the press, as happened in 2016. A former employee at a UK law firm was pronounced liable by the ICO and prosecuted under the Data Protection Act for sending confidential client data to their personal account, which they hope to use as leverage in their new role at a rival company. Loss of data through personal email could mean: • Breach of contracts or non-disclosure agreements • Loss of IP and proprietary research • Breach of data protection regulations • Heavy fines imposed by regulators and clients (GDPR, in particular will greatly increase fines for all manner of data breaches) In brief: something as seemingly insignificant as sending sensitive company data to a personal email account can be devastating. “Nearly 75% of office employees send work files to a personal email account, a majority of whom say it’s because they prefer using their own computer, while 14% say it’s because it’s too much work to bring their work laptop home.” How do you fix the problem? 1. Educate your workforce Make sure your employees know how to observe best data security practices. Make sure they understand how best to secure the data they work with, especially confidential data, and ensure they adhere to company data security policies, hosting refresher courses if necessary. 2. Ease of access Try as much as possible to ensure that your employees don’t feel the need to send work to their personal emails. Implement secure file storage platforms they can access from home (SharePoint, GSuite, etc) or a corporate VPN so they can securely access the company network from anywhere. You need to strike that happy middle ground between “easy to use but insecure” and “airtight but really disruptive”. 3. Be proactive, not reactive Choose email security platforms that offer the most complete protection against sending to unauthorized email accounts before it becomes a problem, instead of being left scrambling for a solution in the aftermath. Find a solution that tracks and logs attempts to send data to a personal email address, and use the metrics to open a conversation with employees about data protection.
DLP
Risks of Email Communication
26 February 2019
A consumer survey conducted by Adobe in 2018 found that on a typical weekday, their consumers are checking their work email an average 3.1 hours; their personal email, 2.5 hours. This makes email one of the most habitual platforms employees use, which makes changing this user behavior that much more challenging. Email’s speed and ubiquity also make it one of the single biggest threats to a company, its employees, and its data. Employees of all levels, in all industries, depend on the ability to communicate quickly and easily in order to get their jobs done. Investment bankers share market sensitive information to buy and sell companies. Lawyers share evidence on litigation matters. Hedge fund managers share data on positions or trading strategies. Over the past 20 years, email has grown to become the main artery of communication for the enterprise. According to research conducted by McKinsey in 2012, reading and answering email accounts for 28% of the average employee workday this makes email one of the most habitual tasks employees conduct.
Human error is incredibly difficult to understand, let alone predict. Changes in people’s stress levels, morale, engagement and attention can lead to misdirected emails. While a growing number of enterprise processes are now being automated, email communication is currently still reliant on human interaction and judgement – all of which makes it particularly vulnerable to human error. No matter how structured or ingrained a process or behavior is, mistakes are inescapable, and inevitable. The risk of data leakage is heightened by many of the factors that make email so useful. The same email address will send personal and professional messages, often in succession. It is platform agnostic – you can send an email to any other email address regardless of its platform making it very difficult to develop a complete security solution for a channel with so many front-end standards and configurations. As email becomes easier to use the associated risks also increase. Paul Regan, Head of Cybersecurity at Winterflood Securities noted that misdirected emails are where his firm has seen the biggest risk in the last couple of years.
Email used to be much more manual, but functions such as those Regan refers to have upped the risk, and even with an emphasis on data privacy training, the risks have grown. Hyde pointed to another worrying trend: “The way email used to be used was very manual. As time has gone on, it’s become much easier to use. It’s available on more devices, better at predicting what you’re going to do – but with that ease of use comes risk. “We trust the technology hugely, so that when something goes wrong it happens so quickly that it’s impossible to do anything about it – that’s the reality of email.” A misdirected email, such a seemingly small mistake, could heavily damage your relationships with clients and your level of public trust.
“Imagine, your most important client receives an email with financial or sensitive information going to somebody else. You have a good chance of losing that client and certainly your standing will be hit.” “It’s too late to go back now”, noted Regan. “I feel that email is an inherently weak medium, and it’s not going to change. “Deploying Tessian for us is recognition that our employees are trying to do the right thing. “This is not about having some central security department, overseeing everybody and trying to catch someone doing bad things. It’s a safety net that catches things that otherwise would be a problem,” said Hyde.
DLP
Bupa Fined £175,000: The Risks and Costs of Unauthorized Emails
18 October 2018
As the recent Bupa data breach highlighted, the sending of unauthorized emails – an email that is intentionally sent to an unauthorized recipient, such as an employee’s personal email account – can have a detrimental financial and reputational impact upon an organization. The global insurance and healthcare group’s failure to prevent the exfiltration and attempted sale of over half a million international health insurance customers’ personal information led to a £175,000 fine and a damning evaluation of its negligent security practices.
The loss of consumer data can also result in: • Breaching contracts or non-disclosure agreements • The loss of IP and proprietary research • Breaching data protection regulations • Heavy fines imposed by regulators and clients (GDPR, in particular, will greatly increase fines for all manner of data breaches) Despite such demonstrably damaging ramifications, many organizations do not have sufficiently secure networks and, as a result, lack the necessary visibility over how sensitive data is processed and stored. Before they know it, sensitive data is shared, stolen and sold; the damage is done. For large organizations like Bupa, monitoring thousands of employees and hundreds of thousands of email communications containing millions of pieces of data can seem an insurmountable and relentless task. In 2018, it is estimated that 124.5 billion business emails were sent every day with each employee sending an average of 31 each. These figures are only expected to increase (by at a rate of 3% per annum over the next few years) as corporate email networks grow in size and importance. Organizations that possess large amounts of highly sensitive patient or consumer data like Bupa have a duty to prevent this kind of data breach from happening. If they cannot monitor or control employee behaviour, they must take the necessary steps to find and invest in an approach and solution that can prevent unauthorized emails from being sent. It’s crucial to be proactive – rather than reactive – to address this kind of threat As such, we recommend enterprises employ an email security platform that offers comprehensive protection against the sending of unauthorized emails. Tessian Enforcer, for example, uses machine learning to understand human conversation patterns in order to detect, flag and prevent anomalous emails, which may contain sensitive data, from being sent to unauthorized or personal email accounts.
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