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ATO/BEC, Data Exfiltration, Email DLP, Integrated Cloud Email Security
Introducing Tessian Human Layer Security Intelligence
By Ed Bishop
Thursday, June 11th, 2020
Attention Security, Compliance. and IT leaders: You can now continuously and proactively downtrend Human Layer risks in your organization with zero manual investigation. How? With Tessian Human Layer Security Intelligence.
Why did Tessian create Human Layer Security Intelligence? 88% of data breaches are caused by human error.  To combat that, Tessian built, created, and developed Defender to prevent spear phishing, Business Email Compromise, and other targeted impersonation attacks; Guardian to prevent accidental data loss; and Enforcer to prevent data exfiltration. But, detection and prevention are only one part of the solution. To be truly effective, solutions have to proactively and consistently improve an organization’s broader security posture.  Security leaders should be able to: Comprehensively understand the risks within their organization Benchmark those risks against peers Reduce the burden of manual investigation, especially for thinly-stretched teams  Move swiftly from investigation to remediation Easily view the outcome of remediation efforts to understand the ROI on security products   Tessian Human Layer Security Intelligence does all of the above.  We provide our customers with real-time insights into risks on email and give security teams the tools they need to downtrend those risks. 
What are the key benefits of Human Layer Security Intelligence? We’ve already mentioned some of the key challenges that security, compliance, and IT leaders are up against. So, how does Human Layer Security Intelligence make your jobs easier? Predict. Track and compare trends, preempt incidents, and influence employee behavior to improve overall security posture.
Improving security visibility is key.  With HLS Intelligence, Tessian customers can easily and automatically get detailed insights into inbound and outbound security threats and employee actions.  Why does this matter? It allows security leaders to know precisely where to focus their efforts and which corrective actions to take in order to best allocate their resources.  For example, with clear visibility of employee behavior, it will be easy to spot those employees who frequently attempt to send company data to their personal email accounts to work from home. That way, security teams can then offer additional, targeted training and issue helpful reminders of existing security policies. Beyond that, customers will also be able to benchmark their risk levels against industry peers. This will help organizations identify strengths and successes and help highlight how and where they can improve their security posture.  Prevent. Investigate and communicate risks quickly and easily with detailed event threat breakdowns.
Most solutions are a blackbox when it comes to understanding the threats detected. And, without knowing the “who, what, when, and why” behind security events, mitigation can be difficult.  In an effort to pin down the “who, what, when, and why”, security and IT teams spend countless hours aggregating data, analyzing data, and investigating incidents. But, this is a slow, manual process which means remedial response times are often longer than they should be. Not with Tessian’s HLS Intelligence.  HLS Intelligence offers a curated list of high priority events so security leaders can immediately zero in on those that are most critical. No manual investigation required.  It’s simple: View detailed breakdowns and automated analysis of security events Take immediate action Generate reports with a single click to communicate detected and prevented risks to stakeholders.  Protect. Take the burden out of remediation with robust mitigation tools. 
While the goal is to prevent incidents from happening in the first place, robust mitigation tools are an essential part of any security solution.  With email quarantine and post-delivery protection like bulk email removal and single-click clawback, it’s easier than ever for security teams to take action.  And, with shared threat intelligence across the entire Tessian ecosystem, machine learning models automatically update and protect all Tessian Defender customers from all blocked domains. That means Tessian customers automatically benefit from Tessian’s network effect and new threats can be prevented before they’re even seen in your environment. How Can I Use Human Layer Security Intelligence? The benefits of Tessian Human Layer Security Intelligence are best understood in the context of real situations. So, let’s look at three example use cases. Use Case #1: Thwart burst attack campaigns and block COVID-19-related impersonation domains.  Several employees receive an email that appears to be from a health organization with advice around COVID-19. The email automatically triggers a warning advising employees that the email is suspicious based off of the content and sender information.  Simultaneously, you’re alerted of the burst attack and are able to first delete the email from user inboxes and then block the domain. Each of these two actions requires a single click. But, it’s not just your organization that’s protected from the threat. All Tessian customers will benefit as the domain is automatically blocked across the Tessian ecosystem. Use Case #2: Reduce data loss and increase secure behavior. In reviewing outbound events, you notice two employees are frequently sending emails with attachments to their personal accounts. When presented with a warning that explains why the action is being flagged as suspicious, they opt to send the email anyway. Why? Because these exfiltration attempts aren’t intentionally malicious, they’re simply trying to ensure they have access to the documents they need to work, wherever they are.  Instead of implementing a blanket rule that blocks all emails to freemail accounts across the company, you can take a more targeted approach. You can use this as an opportunity to reinforce security awareness training and in-house policies and explain why the email is considered unauthorized despite the employees’ good intentions.  You can also offer alternatives that would enable the employees to access relevant documents without having to email attachments to themselves. Use Case #3: Predict employee exits and prevent data exfiltration. In reviewing outbound events, you notice a spike in data exfiltration attempts by an employee. In the last week, he’s sent upwards of 20 attachments to a recipient he has no previous email history with. With this information in mind, you approach his line manager and find out that two weeks ago, the employee was denied a promotion and subsequent raise. You now have oversight of the “who, what, why, and when”.  This employee is planning on resigning and is taking company data with him. To prevent any further data exfiltration attempts, you can create custom filters specifically for that user, including customized warning messages or you could create a filter that would automatically block any future exfiltration attempts. For example, you could block email communications containing attachments to specific a domain or block emails containing attachments altogether, depending on the severity of the previous incidents.  Learn more Interested in learning more about Tessian Human Layer Security Intelligence and how it can help you strengthen your defense against human error on email? Get in touch with your Customer Success contact. Not yet a Tessian customer? Book a demo! 
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Data Exfiltration, Email DLP
What is Data Exfiltration on Email and How Do You Prevent It?
By Maddie Rosenthal
Thursday, June 4th, 2020
While there are various ways in which someone can exfiltrate data – which we’ve covered in What is Data Exfiltration? Tips for Preventing Data Exfiltration Attacks – email is the biggest risk. In fact, it’s the threat vector IT leaders are most concerned about protecting.   In this article we’ll answer three key questions: What is data exfiltration on email? Why is it so dangerous? How can organizations prevent it from happening? What is data exfiltration on email?   In order to understand what data exfiltration on email is, we should start with what data exfiltration is more broadly.   Data exfiltration is the act of sensitive data deliberately being moved from inside an organization to outside an organization’s perimeter without permission. This can be done through the digital transfer of data, the theft of documents or servers, or via an automated process.   Data and sensitive information found in spreadsheets, calendars, trading algorithms, planning documents, and customer PII can be moved outside of an organization’s perimeter via email in one of two ways:   Someone inside the organization (like an employee, exiting employee, contractor, or business partner) emailing data to their own personal accounts or to a third-party. External bad actors targeting employees with phishing or spear phishing scams. While these email attacks can be designed for the purpose of initiating a wire transfer, they’re often ploys to extract sensitive information or credentials or to install malware onto a network.
Why is data exfiltration on email so dangerous?   We’ve already mentioned that email is the threat vector IT leaders are most concerned about protecting. But why?   There are two key reasons: it’s easy to access (email accounts today are managed on laptops, smartphones, tablets, and even watches) and the underlying technology behind email hasn’t evolved since its inception in the 1970s. That means there are core security features missing that modern communication platforms have as a standard, including the ability to redact or recall and encryption-by-default.    This makes it one of the go-to mediums for data exfiltration. In fact, according to one report, 10% of all insiders and 10% of all external bad actors use email to steal data. And, if data is successfully exfiltrated, the consequences can be tremendous.   Case in point: A major US health insurance provider agreed to pay $115 million to settle a class-action lawsuit after it was discovered that an employee had stolen data on 18,000 Medicare members, including names, ID numbers, Social Security numbers, health plan IDs, and dates of enrollment.    Interested in learning more about incidents like this? Read 6 Examples of Data Exfiltration on our blog.    How can I prevent data exfiltration on email?   Data exfiltration is a big problem for organizations.    Whether it’s an exiting employee emailing data to their personal accounts on their way out (which 45% of employees admit to doing) or a hacker targeting someone with privileged access to networks and data via a phishing email, security, IT, and compliance leaders must find a way to prevent sensitive information from leaving their organization.    There are several solutions available, but few succeed in preventing data exfiltration attempts on email. Blocking or blacklisting domains   What it is: Data exfiltration prevention has often been simplified to stopping communication with certain accounts/domains (namely freemail accounts like @gmail).   Why it doesn’t work: This is a blunt approach that impedes on employee productivity. There are many legitimate reasons to communicate with freemail accounts, such as updating private clients, managing freelancers, or emailing friends and family about non-work issues. What’s more, a determined insider could easily circumvent this by setting up an account with its own domain. Secure Email Gateways (SEGs)   What it is: SEGs are essentially more sophisticated spam filters. They’re used to block malicious inbound email threats like phishing attacks.   Why it doesn’t work: While SEGs may be effective in blocking bulk phishing emails, they can’t stop all spear phishing emails. That means the most targeted attacks can still get through and employees could easily fall victim to an attack and unknowingly exfiltrate data to a bad actor. (Not sure what the difference is between phishing and spear phishing? Read this.) Rule-Based solutions   What it is: Organizations could implement rule-based solutions that take the form of “if-then” statements. These “if-then” statements involve keywords, email addresses, and regular expressions that look for signals of data exfiltration. For example, “If an email contains the word “social security number”, then quarantine the email and alert IT.”   Why it doesn’t work: Rule-based solutions are impossible to maintain because data changes in value and sensitivity over time. Beyond that, you simply can’t define or predict human behavior with rules. That’s why 85% of IT leaders say rule-based DLP is admin-intensive and just 18% say it’s the most effective way to prevent data loss.  Training    What it is: Because it’s people who control our data, training is a logical solution to data exfiltration. In fact, 61% of organizations have training every 6 months or more frequently.    Why it doesn’t work: While training does help educate employees about data exfiltration and what the consequences are, it’s not a long-term solution and won’t stop the few bad eggs from doing it. You also can’t train away human error.  Machine Learning   What it is: Machine learning (ML) models trained on historical email data understand the intricacies and fluctuations of human relationships over time. That means ML models can constantly update their “thinking” to determine whether an action looks like exfiltration or not.    Why it does work: This is the “human” way forward. At Tessian, we call it Human Layer Security. Machine-intelligent software recognizes what looks suspicious, much like a trained security professional could. However, unlike humans, it can do this thousands of times per second without missing information or getting tired.  How does Tessian prevent data exfiltration on email?   Tessian uses stateful machine learning to prevent data exfiltration on email by turning an organization’s own data into its best defense against inbound and outbound email security threats. We currently protect customers across industries, including those that are highly regulated like Legal and Financial Services.   Tessian Cloud Email Security intelligently prevents advanced email threats and protects against data loss, to strengthen email security and build smarter security cultures in modern enterprises. Our platform understands human behavior and relationships, enabling it to automatically detect and prevent anomalous and dangerous activity like data exfiltration attempts and targeted phishing attacks.    Importantly, Tessian’s technology automatically updates its understanding of human behavior and evolving relationships through continuous analysis and learning of the organization’s email network.   
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Email DLP
How Does Data Loss Prevention Work?
By Maddie Rosenthal
Tuesday, June 2nd, 2020
There’s been a 47% increase in data loss incidents over the last two years; this includes accidental data loss and deliberate data exfiltration by negligent or disgruntled employees or contractors. While every incident of data loss or leakage may not result in a breach, many do, and the cost can be tremendous. That’s why today, data loss prevention (DLP) is one of the top spending priorities for IT leaders.
We’ve covered data loss prevention broadly in this blog: What is Data Loss Prevention (DLP) – A Complete Overview of DLP, but in this article, we’ll detail how exactly DLP works.  How does DLP work? DLP software monitors, detects, and blocks sensitive data from leaving an organization.  Monitor  DLP solutions monitor different entry and exit points of a corporate network, such as user devices, email clients, servers, or gateways within the network to safeguard data in different forms, including data in motion, data in use, and data at rest.  Data in motion refers to data that is sent and received over your network.  Data in use refers to data that you are using in your computer memory.  Data at rest refers to data that is stored in a database, file, or a server.  Detect If security software detects anything suspicious, such as an email attachment containing credit card details or an attempt to print confidential documents, a predefined response will kick in.  Note: This predefined response will depend on the solution itself and how it’s configured. Block Most DLP solutions offer organizations the ability to block potentially risky communications or to simply flag the anomaly for administrators to follow up on. Properly configured DLP allows organizations to block sensitive information while permitting non-sensitive communications to continue.  Again, this depends entirely on the solution and how it’s configured. So, how do current solutions prevent data loss? How do current solutions prevent data loss? While all DLP solutions will monitor, detect, and block data, there are still several different solutions.  Unfortunately, many fall short. Manually labeling and tagging sensitive data How it works: Security teams can manually label and tag sensitive data. This way, it can be monitored (and blocked) when it is seen moving outside the network.  Why it’s ineffective: This approach relies entirely on employees tagging data correctly. Given how much data organizations handle, the manual process of tagging isn’t viable; employees may label incorrectly or, worse, not do it at all. Rule-Based solutions How it works: The majority of DLP solutions rely on rules that take the form of “if-then” statements. These “if-then” statements involve keywords, email addresses, and regular expressions that look for signals of data exfiltration or accidental data loss. For example, “If an employee attempts to download a file larger than 1.0 MB, then block the download and alert IT.” Why it’s ineffective: Similar to tagging, rule-based solutions are impossible to maintain because data changes in value and sensitivity over time. Beyond that, you simply can’t define or predict human behavior with rules. That’s why 85% of IT leaders say rule-based DLP is admin-intensive and just 18% say it’s the most effective way to prevent data loss.  Blocking or blacklisting domains, channels, or software     How it works: DLP has often been simplified to simply stopping communication with certain accounts/domains (namely freemail accounts like @gmail) or blocking access to certain tools and software (like DropBox, for example).  Why it’s ineffective: This is a blunt approach that impedes on employee productivity. There are many legitimate reasons to communicate with freemail accounts, such as updating private clients, managing freelancers, or emailing friends and family about non-work issues. What’s more, a determined insider could easily circumvent this by setting up an account with its own domain. Machine Learning How it works: Machine learning models are trained off human behavior which means they understand the intricacies and fluctuations of human relationships over time. This way, they can determine whether an action looks like deliberate exfiltration or accidental data loss and prevent it before it happens.  Why it IS effective: This is the “human” way forward. Machine-intelligent software recognizes what looks suspicious, much like a trained security professional could. However, unlike humans, it can do this thousands of times per second without missing information or getting tired.  How to choose a DLP solution Importantly, before a DLP solution is even considered, security teams have to determine which data is considered most sensitive and which threat vectors are a priority. Step 1: Prioritize your data Here are just a few of the things security teams should consider: Industry. DLP efforts should start with the most valuable or sensitive information. What is sensitive within your organization? Naturally, those working in Financial Services will have different priorities than those working in Manufacturing. Compliance standards and data protection regulations.GDPR, CCPA, and HIPPA are just a few pieces of legislation that CISOs have to consider when putting together a DLP strategy. In addition to identifying which data is the most valuable for your organization, you have to consider which data you’re obligated to protect by law. How employees communicate. After identifying which data you want to protect and which data you have to protect, you have to figure out how that data is being stored, managed and transmitted by people and teams. Is it via the Cloud? On email? Through text messages? This will help determine which type of DLP solution you need. Step 2: Identify the biggest threat vectors Based on how your employees communicate, you can decide which type of DLP solution is right for your organization.  For example: Network DLP monitors traffic entering and leaving an organization’s network. Endpoint DLP is installed on devices (for example, company laptops or mobile phones) and checks that information is not taken off the device and placed on, or sent to, a non-authorized device. Email DLP is integrated into the email client itself and monitors emails as they are sent.  While these safeguard different threat vectors, they all do the same thing: monitor, detect, and block sensitive data from leaving an organization.  Did you know that email is the top priority for IT leaders? In fact, according to Tessian’s new research report The State of Data Loss Prevention 2020, almost half (47%) said it’s the threat vector they’re most concerned about protecting.  How Does Tessian Next-Gen DLP Work?  Tessian turns an organization’s email data into its best defense against inbound and outbound email security threats. Powered by machine learning, our Human Layer Security technology understands human behavior and relationships, enabling it to automatically detect and prevent dangerous activity like data exfiltration attempts and misdirected emails. Importantly, Tessian’s technology automatically updates its understanding of human behavior and evolving relationships through continuous analysis and learning of the organization’s email network. No rules needed.  Tessian Enforcer detects and prevents data exfiltration attempts by: Analyzing historical email data to understand normal content, context, and communication patterns Establishing, mapping, and continuously updating every employee’s business and non-business email contacts into relationship graphs  Performing real-time analysis of outbound emails before they’re sent to automatically predict whether the email looks like data exfiltration. This is based on insights from relationship graphs, deep inspection of the email content, and previous user behavior Alerting users when data exfiltration attempts are detected with clear, concise, contextual warnings that reinforce security awareness training Tessian Guardian detects and prevents misdirected emails by: Analyzing historical email data to understand normal content, context, and communication patterns Establishing, mapping, and continuously updating every employee’s business and non-business email contacts into relationship graphs  Performing real-time analysis of outbound emails before they’re sent to automatically predict whether the email looks like it’s being sent to the wrong person. This is based on insights from relationship graphs, deep inspection of the email content, and previous user behavior Alerting users when a misdirected email is detected with clear, concise, contextual warnings that allow employees to correct the recipients before the email is sent
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Email DLP, Integrated Cloud Email Security
Tessian Recognized by 451 Research as a “451 Firestarter”
Monday, June 1st, 2020
We are proud to say that Tessian has received a 451 Firestarter award from leading technology research and advisory firm 451 Research.   The 451 Research Firestarter program recognizes exceptional innovation within the information technology industry. Introduced in 2018 and awarded quarterly, the program is exclusively analyst-led, allowing its team of technology and market experts to highlight organizations they believe are significantly contributing to the overall pace and extent of innovation in the technology market.  In its recent spotlight report, 451 Research said: “Most existing data discovery and data loss prevention (DLP) tools try to discover ‘personally identifiable information’ (PII) like credit card, driver’s license and social security numbers using RegEx searches, fingerprinting or optical character recognition (OCR). In contrast, Tessian’s focus is on finding bad behavior rather than finding sensitive data or PII, by applying machine learning techniques to historical email messages (headers, body and attachments) in order to distinguish between ‘safe’ and ‘unsafe’ emails.”
Earlier this year, 451 Research wrote a report stating that the “the DLP market is ripe for change” and that modern enterprises are looking for next-generation solutions that can detect and prevent both inbound email attacks and outbound email threats. Being recognized as a 451 Firestarter is a recognition of Tessian’s innovative approach to data loss protection. You can learn more about how Tessian is addressing DLP shortcomings here: 451 Research: Market Insight Report. Book a Demo To learn more about how we prevent inbound and outbound email threats and why world-leading businesses like Arm, Man Group, Evercore, and Schroders trust Tessian to protect their people on email, book a demo.
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Life at Tessian
3 Practical Ways To Support Mental Wellbeing in the Workplace
Friday, May 29th, 2020
The relationship between mental wellbeing and work is being talked about now more than ever.  We’re all experiencing different emotions around the current global pandemic and seeing firsthand that if we don’t manage our stress and anxiety, we can’t be productive or thrive in our roles.  At Tessian, we put mental wellbeing at the top of our list of priorities because we know it’s critical to the health and success of our employees. We’re approaching this head on by launching our new mindfulness program — TesWell. TesWell runs for 4 weeks and covers topics like building a mindfulness practice, growing in resilience, understanding emotions, creating habits, and teaching employees how to have difficult conversations. The program is a proactive step to give all Tessians the tools to learn how to grow in openness, awareness, and presence in each moment so we all feel more resilient towards changing circumstances.   Resilience has become especially important during COVID19; we’re all having to adapt to changing work environments. But, we think it’s important to share some of the insights that have been the basis of this new program. This way, people outside of Tessian can support mental wellbeing in their own workplace.
1. Mental wellbeing starts with a conversation One of the most powerful ways you can foster mental wellbeing (or support mental health problems) in your workplace is simply to talk about them — this is the first step to normalizing mental health problems and reducing the stigma around them.   This is important because when we feel we’re able to speak up about our mental health at work, it means we can get ahead of problems and prevent them from spiraling. We’ve found there are many ways to get the conversation started. For example, sharing posts on Slack channels about mental wellbeing (we’ve even created a channel dedicated to wellbeing). Managers have even more opportunities to initiate these conversations. How? By intentionally (and frequently) speaking to people about their own wellbeing.  In a recent session we held with our managers on mental wellbeing, we had some great suggestions on how to start the conversation. These ranged from making sure managers are asking their team members how they’re feeling during 1:1 check-ins to encouraging managers to share their own stories of how they’re coping during this time.  This second point is of particular importance. Leaders must shed light into the darkest corners of their own journey so others know they are not alone in their own fight. This allows employees to feel safe and to begin speaking up about their own mental health challenges.  Think of it as an exercise in empowerment. 2. Leaders need to role-model healthy behaviors Leaders can role-model healthy, stress-reducing behaviors such as taking regularly scheduled breaks, engaging in walking meetings, and going offline at a reasonable hour rather than being available all the time.  We’ve found that using our calendars to demonstrate these healthy behaviours can spark others to feel it’s okay to do the same. For example, taking an hour and a half lunch break to go out for a run and eat lunch, taking a proactive mental health day (and labeling it this way in your calendar), or simply scheduling “meditation” at any point during the day — these are all great ways to do this.  3. Create programs that signal mental wellbeing as a top priority  There are many initiatives companies can implement during COVID19 like TesWell that signal to employees that their wellbeing is important. This could be programs related to physical activity or initiatives that provide social interactions with others (even in this remote world). The point is to help remind employees  that staying healthy requires a holistic approach — we have to nurture our bodies and minds and offer self-compassion to ourselves.  So, make it a priority to help people develop good habits. How? offer meditation, mindfulness, yoga or even a free fitness membership like ClassPass.  The bottom line? You can foster mental wellbeing for your company simply by talking about it.  
Mental wellbeing starts with a conversation. It’s our job, then, to ensure we create a safe space to facilitate those conversations and implement programs so our people know their mental health is a priority.   Whether virtual or in-person, at Tessian, we’re Human First.
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Email DLP, Integrated Cloud Email Security
Guide: How to Stop Data Loss Across 1 Million New Offices
By Maddie Rosenthal
Thursday, May 28th, 2020
Now more than ever, security, IT, and compliance leaders are leaning on each other for support in navigating new challenges around remote-working. And, why wouldn’t they? While some organizations have operated virtually for months and even years before the outbreak of COVID-19, others had never operated a remote workforce. That means they’ve had to – very quickly – equip their teams with new devices and tools, implement new policies and procedures, and update security stacks. Of course, they’re doing all of this while trying to maintain “business as usual” which means trying to monitor and prevent data loss company-wide. That’s exactly why we’ve been hosting virtual events: to pool the wisdom of experienced security and IT leaders and share back with the broader community While you can access our library of webinars here (and register for our next virtual event here), we’ve compiled key takeaways below from our most recent webinar: How to Stop Data Loss Across 1 Million New Offices.  Here’s the actionable advice from Mark Settle, the former CIO of Okta and Karl Knowles, the Global Head of Cyber at HFW.
1. Prioritize email Even with collaboration tools like Slack, email is still King. Or, as Mark put it “email is the central nervous system of almost every company. You really can’t escape it”. Over 124 billion emails are sent and received everyday and employees spend 40% of their time on email. And, when you consider what’s being sent back and forth in emails (spreadsheets, invoices, client information, and other structured and unstructured data) it’s no wonder IT and security leaders consider it the number one threat vector for data loss. Whether it’s a disgruntled employee purposely exfiltrating data or a negligent employee who accidentally sends sensitive information to the wrong person, email is a leaky pipe.  Interested in learning more about how data is lost on email? Read this blog: A Complete Overview of DLP on Email. 2. Clearly communicate what constitutes “data loss” It’s employees who have to take on the role of protecting a company’s most important asset: data. But, unfortunately, many are blissfully unaware of what’s actually considered a data loss incident. It’s not their fault. It’s up to IT leaders – especially now as employees are adjusting to their new work environments – to really communicate what data is sensitive and how that data must be handled.  While those working in Healthcare or Financial Services may be well-versed in what data can and can’t be stored and shared, because of industry-specific compliance standards, the “average” professional may not be. For example: if you don’t tell employees that sending company data to their personal email accounts is considered unauthorized and could lead to a data breach, they’ll never know that they shouldn’t do it. Likewise, many employees don’t realize that sending an email to the wrong person could be classified as a data loss incident.  3. Don’t blame employees, empower them As we’ve said, employees are the gatekeepers of a company’s most sensitive systems and data. But, many aren’t familiar with security best practices or the implications of a breach. And, beyond that, many simply don’t have the necessary tools to work securely. It’s up to IT and security leaders to empower them to do so. How? According to Karl, it comes down to training and technology.
4. Re-think security awareness training Earlier this year at the world’s first Human Layer Security Summit, Mark Logsdon, Head of Cyber Assurance & Oversight at Prudential, explained there are three fundamental problems with training: It’s boring It’s often irrelevant It’s expensive Karl Knowles and Mark Settle shared many of these sentiments. The bottom line is: In order for training to be effective, it has to really resonate. And, for it to really resonate, employees have to understand the who, what, and why behind security policies and procedures. They recommend using different methods and mediums to communicate risks and preventative strategies and – perhaps most importantly – ensure you aren’t overloading them. That means breaking complex subjects down into more manageable pieces and translating technical jargon and concepts into language that’s easier to understand. Top Tip from Karl: Nominate Cyber Champions as a way to gamify training and encourage a positive security culture.  5. Know the limitations of rule-based DLP solutions and invest in technology that proactively adapts DLP isn’t just a challenge now that workforces are remote. It’s been a consistent pain point for IT and security teams for a long time and for several reasons. One of the biggest problems around DLP is that rule-based solutions aren’t adaptive. Not only are they admin-intensive to set-up, but they’re virtually impossible to maintain. You can read more about The Drawbacks of Traditional DLP on Email on our blog.  Learn more about Why DLP is Failing in Tessian’s latest report: The State of Data Loss Prevention 2020. That’s why Karl and Mark recommend investing in technology that’s fast and evolving. The technology is machine learning. Tessian’s DLP solutions (Tessian Enforcer and Tessian Guardian) are powered by machine learning which is why Karl – a customer – considered Tessian an extension of his cyber team.
Interested in learning more about how Tessian can help you detect and prevent data loss wherever your employees are working? Book a demo. And, for more advice, keep up with our blog, LinkedIn, and Twitter for guides, industry news, and events. 
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Email DLP, Integrated Cloud Email Security
The State of Data Loss Prevention 2020: What You Need to Know
Thursday, May 28th, 2020
Today, Tessian released The State of Data Loss Prevention 2020, a comprehensive report that explores new and perennial challenges around data loss prevention.
Our findings reveal that data loss on email is a bigger problem than most realize, that remote-working brings new challenges around DLP, and that the solutions currently deemed most effective may actually be the least. Why does this report matter? IT, security, and compliance readers have a lot to gain by reading this report. To really understand why, we have to look at the current landscape. Insider threats are a growing problem While email threats from external bad actors (like spear phishing and business email compromise) dominate headlines, email threats from insiders are steadily rising. In fact, there’s been a 47% increase in incidents over the last two years. This includes accidental data loss and deliberate data exfiltration. According to Verizon’s 2020 Data Breach Investigations Report “It is a bit disturbing when you realize that your employees’ mistakes account for roughly the same number of breaches as external parties who are actively attacking you.” The DLP market is booming and is on track for significant growth. Why? Because it’s one of the top spending priorities for IT leaders with 21% planning to acquire DLP tools within the next year.  Remote-working makes DLP even more challenging Over the last eight weeks, workforces around the world have transitioned from office-to-home. That means the perimeter has disappeared and past strategies have become obsolete. COVID-19 has been deemed a “field day for Insider Threats”. There are more opportunities than ever for employees to exploit privileged access to data, working from home can reduce the vigilance of employees handling confidential data, and there’s been a marked increase in COVID-19 phishing attacks. While some organizations will encourage their employees to migrate back to offices, many (including Facebook) have already opted to maintain remote-working set-ups.  Interested in learning more about the methods and motives of Insider Threats? Read our blog: What is an Insider Threat? Insider Threat Definitions, Examples, and Solutions. The implications of a data breach are far-reaching  The consequences of a data breach aren’t limited to lost data and revenue loss. Organizations also experience a 2-7% churn rate after a breach. Data privacy regulations add insult to injury. In the first quarter of 2020 alone, GDPR fines totaled nearly €50 million. But, we had to look beyond third-party research and conduct our own.  What will I learn? We analyzed Tessian platform data and commissioned OnePoll to survey 2,000 professionals (1,000 in the US and 1,000 in the UK) and 250 Information Technology (IT) leaders. We also interviewed IT, security, and compliance leaders about their own experiences with DLP. Here’s what we found out: !function(e,t,s,i){var n="InfogramEmbeds",o=e.getElementsByTagName("script"),d=o[0],r=/^http:/.test(e.location)?"http:":"https:";if(/^\/{2}/.test(i)&&(i=r+i),window[n]&&window[n].initialized)window[n].process&&window[n].process();else if(!e.getElementById(s)){var a=e.createElement("script");a.async=1,a.id=s,a.src=i,d.parentNode.insertBefore(a,d)}}(document,0,"infogram-async","//e.infogram.com/js/dist/embed-loader-min.js");
Data loss incidents are happening as much as 38x more often than IT leaders currently estimate. 800 misdirected emails are sent every year in organizations with 1,000 employees. 27,500 emails containing company data are sent to personal accounts every year in organizations with 1,000 employees. 84% of IT leaders say DLP is more challenging when their workforce is working remotely. !function(e,t,s,i){var n="InfogramEmbeds",o=e.getElementsByTagName("script"),d=o[0],r=/^http:/.test(e.location)?"http:":"https:";if(/^\/{2}/.test(i)&&(i=r+i),window[n]&&window[n].initialized)window[n].process&&window[n].process();else if(!e.getElementById(s)){var a=e.createElement("script");a.async=1,a.id=s,a.src=i,d.parentNode.insertBefore(a,d)}}(document,0,"infogram-async","//e.infogram.com/js/dist/embed-loader-min.js");
While 91% of IT leaders say they trust their employees to follow security policies while working from home, almost half (48%) of employees say they’re less likely to follow safe data practices when working from home. Email is the threat vector IT leaders are most concerned about. 54% of employees say they’ll find a workaround if security software or policies prevent them from doing their job and 51% say security tools and software impede their productivity.  While IT leaders believe security awareness training is the most effective way to prevent data loss, machine learning is the better option.  Dozens more insights in the full report, including segmented data around industry, company size, age, and region.  How can I access The State of Data Loss Prevention 2020? IT leaders must have visibility over how their employees are handing and mishandling data on email in order to implement effective DLP strategies.  Our report shines a light on the problems and best solutions.  You can access the full report via our microsite. And, if you’re interested in learning more, save your spot at Tessian Human Layer Security Summit on June 18.
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Remote Working
13 Cybersecurity Sins When Working Remotely
By Maddie Rosenthal
Wednesday, May 27th, 2020
Over the last eight weeks, security vendors, thought leaders, and even mainstream media have been offering employees advice on how to stay secure and productive while working from home. And, why wouldn’t they? The transition from office-to-home has been both sudden and challenging and the risks associated with data loss haven’t disappeared just because the perimeter has. At Tessian, we’ve created (and have been consistently updating) our own remote-working content hub filled with actionable advice for security, IT, and compliance professionals as well as employees. While you can find the individual articles below, we thought we’d combine all of the tips we’ve shared over the last two months into one easy-to-read article. Advice from Security Leaders for Security Leaders: How to Navigate New Remote-Working Challenges Ultimate Guide to Staying Secure While Working Remotely  Remote Worker’s Guide to: Preventing Data Loss Remote Worker’s Guide to: BYOD Policies  11 Tools to Help You Stay Secure and Productive While Working Remotely  Here are 13 things you shouldn’t do when working remotely from a cybersecurity perspective.  1. Don’t send company data to your personal email accounts. As many organizations have had to adopt new tools and systems like VPNs and Cloud Storage on the fly, some employees may have had to resort to sending company data to their personal email accounts in order to continue doing their job.  We understand that doing so may have been viewed at the “only option”, but it’s important to note that this is not wise from a security perspective. While we’ve written about this in detail on our blog The Dark Side of Sending Work Emails “Home”, the short-and-sweet version is this: Personal email accounts are less secure and more likely to be compromised than work email accounts. Why? Read point #5 to find out.  2. Don’t share Zoom links or Meeting IDs.  Zoom – like so many other remote-working tools – is enabling workforces around the world to continue collaborating despite being out-of-office. But, as we highlighted in our Ultimate Guide to Staying Secure While Working Remotely, there are precautions you must take in order to prevent attackers from infiltrating your calls. While there are plenty of lists circulating with top tips around using Zoom, the most important piece of advice we can offer is to not share your Zoom Meeting ID (or link) with anyone you don’t work with directly or otherwise trust.  Importantly, this Meeting ID appears at the top of your conference window, which means if you share a screenshot of your call, anyone who sees the screenshot can access this meeting. If you want to be proactive in locking down your Zoom calls, you should also ensure all of your meetings require a password to join. 3. Don’t ignore warnings from IT and security teams or other authoritative sources.  Since the outbreak of COVID-19, we’ve seen a spike in phishing attacks. Why? Because hackers tend to take advantage of emergencies, times of general uncertainty, and key calendar moments. IT and security teams and even organizations like the FBI have been working hard to communicate these threats and how to avoid them. But – importantly – these warnings are useless unless employees heed the advice.  Whether it’s an email outlining how to spot a phishing email or an announcement from your line manager about updating your iOS, employees should take warnings seriously and take action immediately.  4. Don’t work off of personal devices.  While it may seem harmless, using your personal devices – whether it’s a laptop, desktop computer, mobile device, or tablet – for work-related activities creates big security risks. To start, your personal devices won’t be configured with the same security software as your work device.  Whether it’s the protection offered by a simple firewall or antivirus software, you and your data are more secure when working on company-sanctioned devices. Note: Some organizations have adopted more flexible BYOD policies. You can learn how to combat the security risks associated with these policies on our blog. 5. Don’t action email requests without double-checking their legitimacy.  Phishing and other social engineering attacks are designed for one of three reasons: to extract sensitive information or credentials, to install malware onto a network, or to initiate a wire transfer. To avoid falling victim to one of these scams and potentially actioning a request that isn’t legitimate, make sure you double-check that the person making the request is who they say they are.  For example, if your CEO asks you to change an account number on an invoice, contact him or her directly – via phone call, text, Slack or a separate email – before doing so. Likewise, if someone in HR asks you to share any credentialsor other personal information, get in touch with them via phone or a separate email thread before responding.  6. Don’t use weak passwords.  Many organizations have strict password policies, including the enforcement of multi-factor authentication. It makes sense. If a bad actor gained access to your applications – whether it’s your email account or collaboration tools – they’ll have free rein over your most sensitive systems and data.  If your organization doesn’t have any policies in place, our advice is to use 6-digit PINs or complex swipe codes on mobile devices and strong passwords that utilize numbers, letters, and characters for laptops and other log-ins.  If you’re having trouble managing your passwords, discuss the use of a password manager with your IT department. 7. Don’t lose touch with your IT or security teams.  Communication – especially during periods of transition and disruption- is key.  If you’re unsure about any security policies or procedures, how to use your personal device securely, or if you believe your device or network has been compromised in any way, don’t be afraid to communicate with your IT and security teams. That’s what they’re there for. Moreover, the more information they have and the sooner they have it, the better equipped they are to keep you and your devices protected.  8. Don’t use public Wi-Fi or mobile hotspots.  Given the digital transformation, most of us rely on internet access to do our jobs. Unfortunately, we can’t connect to just any network.  The open nature of public Wi-Fi means your laptop or other device could be accessible to opportunistic hackers. Likewise, if a phone is being used as a hotspot and has already been compromised by an attacker, it’s possible it could be used to pivot to the corporate network. With that said, you should only use networks you’re absolutely confident are secure.  9. Don’t download new tools or software without approval.  IT and security teams have processes in place that help them identify which applications are and aren’t in compliance with their data and privacy protection criteria. That means that if they haven’t approved the use of a certain tool, it probably isn’t safe in their opinion. Even if a certain tool makes your job easier to do, you shouldn’t download – or even use – tools or software without express permission to use them. Whether it’s a design, writing, or project management tool, you must communicate with your in-house teams before clicking “download”.  10. Don’t leave work devices or documents in plain sight.  Your devices are gateways to sensitive information. While we’ve already covered the importance of password-protecting these devices, preventing them from being stolen is vital, too.  Avoid leaving laptops, tablets, mobile devices, and documents containing sensitive company or client information in plain sight, such as near windows at home or on a passenger seat if traveling by car. This will help prevent opportunistic theft.  Any organization that has a remote-working policy in place should also provide employees with privacy screens for their laptops, and encourage employees to always work in positions that minimize line-of-sight views of their screens by others. This has the added benefit of showing clients or other professional contacts that the business takes security seriously. 11. Don’t give hackers the information they need to execute social engineering attacks.  When planning a spear phishing attack – a type of phishing attack that is targeted at a specific individual or small set of individuals – an attacker will try to gather as much open-source intelligence about their target as they can in order to make the email as believable as possible.  Don’t make it easier for them by sharing personal information on OOO messages or on social media like LinkedIn. This includes phone numbers, alternative email addresses, travel plans, details about company structure and reporting lines, and other data points.  12. Don’t be afraid to ask questions about security policies and procedures.  When working from home or otherwise outside of the office, you have much more autonomy. But that doesn’t mean you should disregard the processes and policies your organization has in place. And, part of following processes and policies is understanding them in the first place. IT and security teams are there to help you. If anything is unclear, send them an email, pick up the phone, or file a request.   13. Don’t forget the basics of security best practice.  While we’ve offered plenty of advice that’s specific to remote-working, following general security best practices will help prevent security incidents, too.  Most employees receive annual security training or, at the very least, had some security training during their onboarding process. If you didn’t, below are some of the basics. Don’t reuse passwords. Don’t share your passwords with anyone. Stay up-to-date on compliance standards and regulations specific to your industry. Report incidents of theft. Don’t share sensitive company information with people outside of your organization.  If any of the above are unclear, refer back to point #7. Ask your IT, security, or HR teams. Communication is key! What’s next? While most organizations and individuals have started to adjust to “the new normal”, it’s important to remember that, eventually, some of us will move back to our office environments. The above tips are relevant wherever you’re working, whether that’s at home, from a cafe, on public transport, or at your desk in the office. Looking for more insights on what\s next in this new world of work? We’re hosting our first virtual Human Layer Security Summit on June 18. Find out more – including the agenda for the day – here. 
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Integrated Cloud Email Security
7 Reasons to Attend Tessian Virtual Human Layer Security Summit
Tuesday, May 26th, 2020
On June 18, we’re hosting Tessian Human Layer Security Summit and you’re invited.  The theme? The new world of work. While businesses have flexed fast to adapt to remote-working, there are still plenty of challenges security, compliance, and IT leaders have to overcome.  That’s why we’re bringing thousands of people together from around the world – including over a dozen speakers and partners – to discuss what’s happened and (more importantly) what’s next. We know what you’re thinking: How is this virtual event different from others you’ve been invited to or attended? We’ll tell you.
1. You’ll hear from thought leaders from world-renowned institutions We believe that diverse perspectives lead to better solutions, which is why we’ve brought together such a wide range of voices from the world’s top businesses and institutions.  We’ll be welcoming security and business leaders from Amazon Web Services, The FBI, Unilever, Investec, and more and each speaker will cover a topic that demonstrates their expertise and unique point of view. So, what will they be covering? The evolving risk landscape, how new compliance standards affect business and cybersecurity strategies, challenges in preventing data loss, and how to build and maintain a happy and productive remote workforce.  2. You’ll have a chance to ask your most pressing questions around cybersecurity, remote-working, and business continuity While the agenda is jam-packed with fireside chats, presentations, and panel discussions, we’ve left plenty of time for you to voice your thoughts, too. After all, the name of the game is diverse perspectives. We’ll be opening the floor to all attendees to ask their most pressing questions and our speakers will answer them live. You can even submit your questions ahead of time by emailing monica.nio@tessian.com. This way, you can leave the event with actionable advice related specifically to you and your organization. 
3. You’ll learn more about human-centric security strategies  The Human Element has been a buzzword throughout 2020. But, do you know how to create and implement security strategies that are human-centric? You will after this event. You’ll hear why solving the problem of human error on email is more important now than ever, how security and privacy risks have evolved as the perimeter has disappeared, and how Tessian’s Human Layer Security platform has helped Tessian customers prevent data loss incidents on email.  Want a sneak peek at what you might learn? Check out these insights from the world’s first Human Layer Security Summit.  4. You’ll be the first to know about exciting company and industry news  While we don’t want to spoil all the surprises, you should know that we’ll be announcing some very exciting news that will bring greater visibility into threats specific to your organization.  Not only will we be unveiling new technology that gives security, IT, and compliance leaders a birds’ eye view into data loss trends, but we’ll be sharing key findings from our groundbreaking research into the State of Data Loss Prevention 2020. 
5. You’ll be in good company  We hosted our first-ever Human Layer Security Summit in March where hundreds of attendees (both in-person and online) joined the conversation. This event will be even bigger. Thousands of leading C-suite executives, business leaders, and security professionals from across continents will be under the same (virtual) roof which means this event is the perfect opportunity to network and connect with the larger cybersecurity community.  Whether you’re looking for advice, allies, or future opportunities, this is your chance, especially considering all of our incredible partners for the event: HackerOne, Noord, The SASIG, Women in Security and Privacy, and Security Current. 6. You don’t have to change out of your pajamas While most of us are all too familiar with challenges around remote-working, we can’t ignore that there are some benefits, too. For example: Being able to ask the former CEO of Upwork a question while sitting in your pajamas.  This is especially relevant for those tuning in from California, as the event kicks off at 7:00 AM PST. Of course, feel free to join in whatever you’re comfortable in.  7. …It’s free! Attendees have a lot to gain by joining us on June 18 and nothing to lose; the event is 100% free.  All you have to do is register now to save your spot and tune in on the day.  Can’t make it on June 18? Don’t worry! By registering, you’ll have on-demand access to watch the full series of keynotes, panel discussions, and more after the live session.
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Integrated Cloud Email Security, Compliance
Two Years Later: 3 Ways GDPR Has Affected Cybersecurity
By Maddie Rosenthal
Thursday, May 14th, 2020
This month we celebrate the two year anniversary of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). While the road to compliance hasn’t been easy for organizations in Europe and beyond, it’s clear this benchmark legislation has been a step in the right direction for data rights, privacy, and protection.  It’s also had a big impact on cybersecurity. Not only is cybersecurity now considered business-critical – which is big news for an industry that has historically struggled to communicate its value and ROI – but we’ve seen incredible innovation in security solutions, too. Read on to learn more about how GDPR has affected cybersecurity or, for more context around GDPR and its implications, read GDPR: 13 Most Asked Questions + Answers.  1. Cybersecurity is now a business enabler  While cybersecurity has historically been a siloed department, data privacy regulations and compliance standards like GDPR have helped prove the business value of a strong cybersecurity strategy.  To start, cybersecurity solutions help organizations stay compliant by preventing data breaches. This isn’t trivial. While the fines under these new compliance standards are hefty (GDPR fines totaled nearly €50 million in the first quarter of 2020 alone), the implications of a breach extend far beyond regulatory penalties to include: Lost data Lost intellectual property Revenue loss Losing customers and/or their trust Regulatory fines Damaged reputation It’s no surprise, then, that the UK’s cybersecurity sector has grown by 44% since GDPR was rolled out. But, cybersecurity solutions don’t have to be limited to prevention or remediation. In fact, cybersecurity can actually enable businesses and become a unique selling point in and of itself. Now that data protection is top of mind, those organizations that are transparent about their policies and procedures will have a competitive advantage over those that aren’t and will gain credibility and trust from prospects and existing customers or clients. 
2. IT leaders are engaging with (and depending on) employees more often While cybersecurity teams are responsible for creating and implementing effective policies, procedures, and tech solutions, data protection is the responsibility of the entire organization. Why? Because data loss is a human problem with 88% of breaches being caused by human error, not cyberattacks. The fact is, employees control business’ most sensitive systems and data, and one mistake – whether it’s a misdirected email or a misconfigured firewall – could have tremendous consequences. That means accountability is required company-wide in order to truly keep data secure and stay compliant.  But, education is the first step in prevention which is why there’s express advice contained within the GDPR to train employees. Importantly, though, training has to actually cut through and stick, which means IT leaders are working hard to effectively communicate risks and responsibilities. Of course, anyone in a cybersecurity leadership position knows this is no easy task.  The key is to ensure training is aligned to the individual business, starting with the people in it and their attitudes towards security. Not sure where to start? Watch Mark Lodgson, Head of Cyber Assurance and Oversight at Prudential, talk about how he measures cyber culture within his organization. 3. The DLP market is booming  Post-GDPR, organizations are spending more than ever to protect their systems and data, and, unsurprisingly, one of the top spending priorities for IT leaders is data loss prevention (DLP). While the DLP market is keeping up with demand (DLP market revenues are projected to double from $1.24 billion in 2019 to $2.28 by the end of 2023), data loss prevention remains a pain point for most senior executives because, well, most DLP solutions don’t work. According to a new report from 451 Research “DLP technology has developed a reputation as much for inaccuracy, false positives, and poor performance as it has for protecting data.” The shortcomings of DLP solutions are reflected in the number of incidents of data loss and data exfiltration being reported, too, up 47% over the last two years. The problem is that most DLP solutions rely on rules to detect and prevent incidents and most rules cannot effectively be managed by people. It’s too time consuming and complex to update them in tandem with evolving human relationships and compliance standards. But, there’s a better way: machine learning. In fact, Tessian was recently recognized as a Cool Vendor in Gartner’s Cool Vendors in Cloud Office Security report. Why? Because, through a combination of machine intelligence, deep content inspection of email, and stateful mapping of human relationships, Tessian’s Human Layer Security Platform turns your email data into your biggest defense against email security threats.  To learn more about how Tessian uses machine learning to prevent data loss on email, click here.  What’s next? GDPR is just the beginning and the CCPA enforcement date is looming. Are you prepared? Find out on our blog: 5 Things Every CISO Should Know About CCPA’s Impact on Their InfoSec Programs.
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Integrated Cloud Email Security
Tessian Named a Gartner Cool Vendor
Tuesday, May 12th, 2020
We are thrilled to be recognized as a Cool Vendor in the recently published Gartner Cool Vendors in Cloud Office Security report. To us, being named a Gartner Cool Vendor is an honor. Vendors recognized in the report are interesting, new, and innovative. In the report Gartner explains, “as cloud office suite adoption becomes nearly universal, security and risk management leaders must explore ways to protect sensitive information from risks and threats.” Gartner adds that “security and risk management leaders should recognize that cloud office security technology is evolving and converging in sometimes unpredictable ways” and that “the gaps in cloud office technology convergence often result in incomplete data protection and multiple perspectives to data visibility.” The report further states, “the vendors included in this Cool Vendors report focus specifically upon securing applications, communication and data that occur within cloud office environments.”
Tessian recognized as a Cool Vendor in May 2020 Cool Vendors in Cloud Office Security report Tessian is the world’s first Human Layer Security platform that protects organizations from human layer security threats on email.  By turning your email data into your biggest defense, Tessian prevents inbound and outbound email threats caused by human error. Tessian defends against accidental data loss, data exfiltration and insider threats, in addition to defending against advanced inbound threats like business email compromise, spear phishing and other targeted impersonation attacks. Tessian’s machine learning technology turns your email data into intelligence, transforming your most vulnerable endpoint – your employees – into a trusted security asset by taking human error out of the equation.  Tessian Human Layer Security Prevents Human Error on Email Employees control business’ most sensitive systems and data. Whether it is someone in your finance department who oversees billing and banking platforms, or someone in your HR department who controls employee social security numbers and compensation plans — they are the first and last line of defense; the gatekeepers of digital systems and data. This is what we call the Human Layer. And people’s propensity to make mistakes, break the rules, or be hacked are Human Layer Vulnerabilities. These vulnerabilities can cause big problems. In fact, they’re the number one cause of data breaches: 88% of data breaches reported to the UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) are due to human error. To prevent today’s Human Layer Security threats on email, your security controls must understand human behavior. Through a combination of machine intelligence, deep content inspection of email and stateful mapping of email relationships, Tessian turns your email data into your biggest defense against email security threats.  We call it Human Layer Security. What does this mean for security leaders? Our stateful machine learning allows Tessian to understand changing human behavior over time with high accuracy. This means employees experience fewer notification rates and false negatives. Tessian can be deployed in minutes, integrates with O365, Exchange and G-Suite environments and it automatically starts preventing threats within 24 hours of deployment.  Tessian is trusted by world-leading businesses like Arm, Man Group, Evercore and Schroders to protect their people on email. Gartner subscribers can view the Cool Vendors in Cloud Office Security Link.
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Email DLP, Integrated Cloud Email Security
451 Research: Tessian Uses Machine Learning for Better DLP
Monday, May 11th, 2020
According to a new report from 451 Research, “the DLP market is ripe for change” and Tessian could be the next-generation solution organizations need to detect and prevent both inbound email attacks and outbound email threats.  Key findings from the report include: DLP is ranked at the top of a list of over 20 security categories that are expected to see a “significant” increase in spending in the next 12 months Tessian uses stateful machine learning across four different products to prevent human error on email with use cases for both inbound and outbound email threats including anti-phishing and advanced impersonation attacks, accidental data loss, and malicious data exfiltration Tessian is both complementary and competitive to traditional DLP offerings 
DLP: An Unsolvable Problem While the DLP market is saturated with products – from traditional DLP vendors like Broadcom, McAfee, Forcepoint, and Digital Guardian to newer entrants like ArmorBlox, Altitude Networks, and Code42, the consensus is that DLP is, in many ways, failing. According to the report, “DLP technology has developed a reputation as much for inaccuracy, false positives, and poor performance as it has for protecting data.” That may be why DLP remains one of the top spending priorities for IT leaders, with 13% of those surveyed by 451 Research saying they expect to see a “significant increase” in spending over the next 12 months and a further 11% saying they expect to see a “slight increase.” It’s clear organizations need a better way to prevent data loss.  Tessian believes it’s because DLP efforts aren’t addressing the real problem, which is that 88% of data breaches are caused by human error.   Tessian’s Approach to Data Loss Prevention Instead of focusing on the machine layer, Tessian focuses on the human layer and, in doing so, has developed the world’s first Human Layer Security platform.
Our Human Layer Security platform consists of four main products: Tessian Defender, which prevents advanced inbound attacks like spear phishing, Tessian Guardian, which prevents accidental data loss caused by misdirected emails, Tessian Enforcer, which prevents data exfiltration attempts on email. Organizations that implement any of these solutions also get Tessian Constructor, which allows admins to create blacklists, whitelists, and custom filters to ensure email usage remains compliant.  Each of these products applies stateful machine learning techniques to historical email messages (headers, body, and attachments) to understand relationships and establish normal behavior profiles that can be used to distinguish between safe and unsafe emails.  No rules required. According to 451 Research, Tessian succeeds in preventing data loss where others fall short.  “While [most existing DLP tools] are good at finding personally identifiable information (PII), finding and blocking actions such as employees sending files to a personal email account are surprisingly challenging and are quickly out-of-date, so predefined rules are not that effective.” You can read the full report here. Book a Demo By leveraging new capabilities in AI and machine learning, Tessian, according to 451 Research,“delivers more effective DLP” by preventing human error on email.  To learn more about how we prevent inbound and outbound email threats and why world-leading businesses like Arm, Man Group, Evercore, and Schroders trust Tessian to protect their people on email, book a demo.
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