Customer Stories Data Exfiltration DLP Human Layer Security Spear Phishing
How Tessian Is Preventing Breaches and Influencing Safer Behavior in Healthcare
By Maddie Rosenthal
28 October 2020
Company: Cordaan Industry: Healthcare Seats: 6,300 Solutions: Guardian, Enforcer, Defender  About Cordaan Cordaan – one of the largest healthcare providers in Amsterdam – provides care to over 20,000 people from 120 locations across Amsterdam. They do this with the help of 6,000 employees and more than 2,500 volunteers. Cordaan also works in association with research institutes and social organizations.  To help protect the organization’s people, sensitive data, and networks, Cordaan has deployed Tessian Guardian, Enforcer, and Defender to protect over 6,300 employees on email.  Tessian solves three key problems for Cordaan.  Problem: Healthcare employees are especially vulnerable to inbound attacks  When it comes to inbound attacks like spear phishing and business email compromise, the healthcare industry is among the most targeted. It also has the highest costs associated with data breaches. Why? According to Cas de Bie, the Dutch healthcare provider’s Chief Information Officer, it’s not just because organizations operating in this industry handle highly sensitive data. It also has a lot to do with the very nature of the work: helping people. 
Combine this empathetic approach with the stress of a global pandemic, and you’re left with an incredibly vulnerable workforce. With Tessian, Cas is now confident Tessian will identify spear phishing emails before his employees respond to them and that employees’ workflow won’t be disrupted in the process.  When talking about inbound attacks, Cas said “It’s all about awareness. While people probably do know what they’re supposed to do when it comes to email security, it’s different in real life. It’s hard to decide in the moment. Of course, they don’t do it on purpose. They want to make the right decision. Tessian helps them do that.” Problem: Reactive and rule-based solutions weren’t preventing human error on email in the short or long-term To ensure GDPR-compliance, Cordaan prioritized investment in privacy and security solutions. But, according to Cas, “standard” email security, spam filtering solutions, and encryption alone just weren’t enough. They weren’t keeping malicious emails out of inboxes, and they weren’t preventing data loss from insiders. They also weren’t doing anything to improve employee security reflexes in the long-term. 
So, to level-up Cordaan’s email security, Cas was looking for a solution that was: Technologically advanced User-friendly Proactive With Tessian, he found all three. Powered by contextual machine learning and artificial intelligence, our solutions can detect and prevent threats and risky behavior before they become incidents or breaches. How? With the in-the-moment warnings – triggered by anomalous email activity – that look something like this.
These warnings help nudge well-intentioned employees towards safer behavior and ensure data stays within Cordaan’s perimeter. And, because Tessian works silently in the background and analyzes inbound and outbound emails in milliseconds, it’s invisible to employees until they see a warning.   This was incredibly important to Cas, who said that “The added value of Tessian is that it influences behavior. That really resonated with the board and helped me make a strong business case. While I can’t show how cybersecurity creates revenue, I can show – via a risk management calculation – the potential fines we could avoid because of our investment in Tessian”.  Problem: Cordaan’s security team had limited visibility into – and control over – data loss incidents on email  While Cordaan had invested in other email security solutions, Cas and his team still lacked visibility into the frequency of data loss incidents on email. But, after deploying Tessian for a Proof of Value, the scope of the problem became crystal clear.
The reality is that employees do actually send unauthorized and misdirected emails more frequently than expected. (We explore this in detail in our report, The State of Data Loss Prevention 2020.) But, the good news is that this behavior can be influenced and corrected—all without access restrictions that make it harder (or impossible) for employees to do their jobs.  Cas explained it well, saying that “Of course there are things that we have to police and prohibit. But, most of the time, people aren’t doing things maliciously. So it’s nice that – with Tessian – we can take a more nuanced approach. We can influence behavior and help our employees do the right thing.” Learn more about how Tessian prevents human error on email Powered by machine learning, Tessian’s Human Layer Security technology understands human behavior and relationships. Tessian Guardian automatically detects and prevents misdirected emails Tessian Enforcer automatically detects and prevents data exfiltration attempts Tessian Defender automatically detects and prevents spear phishing attacks Importantly, Tessian’s technology automatically updates its understanding of human behavior and evolving relationships through continuous analysis and learning of an organization’s email network. That means it gets smarter over time to keep you protected, wherever and however your work. Interested in learning more about how Tessian can help prevent email mistakes in your organization? You can read some of our customer stories here or book a demo.
Compliance Customer Stories Data Exfiltration DLP Human Layer Security Spear Phishing
18 Actionable Insights From Tessian Human Layer Security Summit
By Maddie Rosenthal
09 September 2020
In case you missed it, Tessian hosted its third (and final) Human Layer Security Summit of 2020 on September 9. This time, we welcomed over a dozen security and business leaders from the world’s top institutions to our virtual stage, including: Jeff Hancock from Stanford University David Kennedy, Co-Founder and Chief Hacking Officer at TrustedSec Merritt Baer, Principal Security Architect at AWS Rachel Beard, Principal Security Technical Architect at Salesforce  Tim Fitzgerald, CISO at Arm  Sandeep Amar, CPO at MSCI  Martyn Booth, CISO at Euromoney  Kevin Storli, Global CTO and UK CISO at PwC Elvis M. Chan, Supervisory Special Agent at the FBI  Nina Schick, Author of “Deep Fakes and the Infocalypse: What You Urgently Need to Know” Joseph Blankenship, VP Research, Security & Risk at Forrester Howard Shultz, Former CEO at Starbucks  While you can watch the full event on YouTube below, we’ve identified 18 valuable insights that security, IT, compliance, and business leaders should apply to their strategies as they round out this year and look forward to the next.
Here’s what we learned at Tessian’s most recent Human Layer Security Summit. Not sure what Human Layer Security is? Check out this guide which covers everything you need to know about this new category of protection.  1. Cybersecurity is mission-critical Security incidents – whether it’s a ransomware attack, brute force attack, or data leakage from an insider threat – have serious consequences. Not only can people lose their jobs, but businesses can lose customer trust, revenue, and momentum. While this may seem obvious to security leaders, it may not be so obvious to individual departments, teams, and stakeholders. But it’s essential that this is communicated (and re-communicated).  Why? Because a company that’s breached cannot fulfill its mission. Keep reading for insights and advice around keeping your company secure, all directly from your peers in the security community. 2. Most breaches start with people People control our most sensitive systems and data. It makes sense, then, that most data breaches start with people. But, that doesn’t mean employees are the weakest link. They’re a business’ strongest asset! So, it’s all about empowering them to make better security decisions. That’s why organizations have to adopt people-centric security solutions and strategies.
The good news is, security leaders don’t face an uphill battle when it comes to helping employees understand their responsibility when it comes to cybersecurity… 3. Yes, employees are aware of their duty to protect data Whether it’s because of compliance standards, cybersecurity headlines in mainstream media, or a larger focus on privacy and protection at work, Martyn Booth, CISO at Euromoney reminded us that most employees are actually well aware of the responsibility they bear when it comes to safeguarding data.  This is great news for security leaders. It means the average employee will be more likely to abide by policies and procedures, will pay closer attention during awareness training, and will therefore contribute to a more positive security culture company-wide. Win-win. 4. But, employees are more vulnerable to phishing scams outside of their normal office environment  While – yes – employees are more conscious of cybersecurity, the shift to remote working has also left them more vulnerable to attacks like phishing scams.  “We have three “places”: home, work, and where we have fun. When we combine two places into one, it’s difficult psychologically. When we’re at home sitting at our coffee table, we don’t have the same cues that remind us to think about security that we do in the office. This is a huge disruption,” Jeff Hancock, Professor at Stanford University explained.  Unfortunately, hackers are taking advantage of these psychological vulnerabilities. And, as David Kennedy, Co-Founder and Chief Hacking Officer at TrustedSec pointed out, this isn’t anything new. Cybercriminals have always been opportunistic in their attacks and therefore take advantage of chaos and emotional distress.  To prevent successful opportunistic attacks, he recommends that you: Reassess what the new baseline is for attacks Educate employees on what threats look like today, given recent events Identify which brands, organizations, people, and departments may be impersonated (and targeted) in relation to the pandemic But, it’s not just inbound email attacks we need to be worried about.  5. They’re more likely to make other mistakes that compromise cybersecurity, too This change to our normal environment doesn’t just affect our ability to spot phishing attacks. It also makes us more likely to make other mistakes that compromise cybersecurity. Across nearly every session, our guest speakers said they’ve seen more incidents involving human error and that security leaders should expect this trend to continue. That’s why training, policies, and technology are all essential components of any security strategy. More on this below. 6. Security awareness training has to be ongoing and ever-evolving At our first Human Layer Security Summit back in March, Mark Logsdon, Head of Cyber Assurance and Oversight at Prudential, highlighted three key flaws in security awareness training: It’s boring It’s often irrelevant It’s expensive What he said is still relevant six months on and it’s a bigger problem than ever, especially now that the perimeter has disappeared, security teams are short-handed, and individual employees are working at home and on their own devices. So, what can security leaders do?  Kevin Storli, Global CTO and UK CISO at PwC highlighted the importance of tailoring training to ensure it’s always relevant. That means that instead of just reminding employees about compliance standards and the importance of a strong password, we should also be focusing on educating employees about remote access, endpoints, and BYOD policies. But one training session isn’t enough to make security best practice really stick. These lessons have to be constantly reinforced through gamification, campaigns, and technology.  Tim Fitzgerald, CISO at Arm highlighted how Tessian’s in-the-moment warnings have helped his employees make the right decisions at the right time.  “Warnings help create that trigger in their brain. It makes them pause and gives them that extra breath before taking the next potentially unsafe step. This is especially important when they’re dealing with data or money. Tessian ensures they question what they’re doing,” he said.
7. You have to combine human policies with technical controls to ensure security  It’s clear that technology and training are both valuable. That means your best bet is to combine the two. In discussion with Ed Bishop, Tessian Co-Founder and CTO, Merritt Baer, Principal Security Architect at AWS and Rachel Beard, Principal Security Technical Architect at Salesforce, both highlighted how important it is for organizations to combine policies with technical controls. But security teams don’t have to shoulder the burden alone. When using tools like Salesforce, for example, organizations can really lean on the vendor to understand how to use the platform securely. Whether it’s 2FA, customized policies, or data encryption, many security features will be built-in.  8. But…Zero Trust security models aren’t always the answer While – yes – it’s up to security teams to ensure policies and controls are in place to safeguard data and systems, too many policies and controls could backfire. That means that “Zero Trust” security models aren’t necessarily the best way to prevent breaches.
9. Security shouldn’t distract people from their jobs  Security teams implement policies and procedures, introduce new software, and make training mandatory for good reason. But, if security becomes a distraction for employees, they won’t exercise best practice.  The truth is, they just want to do the job they were hired to do!  Top tip from the event: Whenever possible, make training and policies customized, succinct, and relevant to individual people or departments.  10. It also shouldn’t prevent them from doing their jobs  This insight goes back to the idea that “Zero Trust” security models may not be the best way forward. Why? Because, like Rachel, Merrit, Sandeep, and Martyn all pointed out: if access controls or policies prevent an employee from doing their job, they’ll find a workaround or a shortcut. But, security should stop threats, not flow. That’s why the most secure path should also be the path of least resistance. Security strategies should find a balance between the right controls and the right environment.  This, of course, is a challenge, especially when it comes to rule-based solutions. “If-then” controls are blunt instruments. Solutions powered by machine learning, on the other hand, detect and prevent threats without getting in the way. You can learn more about the limitations of traditional data loss prevention solutions in our report The State of Data Loss Prevention 2020.  11. Showing downtrending risks helps demonstrate the ROI of security solutions  Throughout the event, several speakers mentioned that preemptive controls are just as important as remediation. And it makes sense. Better to detect risky behavior before a security incident happens, especially given the time and resources required in the event of a data breach.  But tracking risky behavior is also important. That way, security leaders can clearly demonstrate the ROI of security solutions. Martyn Booth, CISO at Euromoney, explained how he uses Tessian Human Layer Security Intelligence to monitor user behavior, influence safer behavior, and track risk over time. “We record how many alerts are sent out and how employees interact with those alerts. Do they follow the acceptable use policy or not? Then, through our escalation workflows that ingest Tessian data, we can escalate or reinforce. From that, we’ve seen incidents involving data exfiltration trend downwards over time. This shows a really clear risk reduction,” he said. 12. Targeted attacks are becoming more difficult to spot and hackers are using more sophisticated techniques As we mentioned earlier, hackers take advantage of psychological vulnerabilities. But, social media has turbo-charged cybercrime, enabling cybercriminals to create more sophisticated attacks that can be directed at larger organizations. Yes, even those with strong cybersecurity. Our speakers mentioned several examples, including Garmin and Twitter. So, how do they do it? Research! LinkedIn, company websites, out-of-office messages, press releases, and news articles all provide valuable information that a hacker could use to craft a believable email. But, there are ways to limit open-source recon. See tips from David Kennedy, Co-Founder and Chief Hacking Officer at TrustedSec, below. 
13. Deepfakes are a serious concern Speaking of social media, Elvis M Chan, Supervisory Special Agent at the FBI and Nina Schick, Author of “Deep Fakes and the Infocalypse: What You Urgently Need to Know”,  took a deep dive into deepfakes. And, according to Nina, “This is not an emerging threat. This threat is here. Now.” While we tend to associate deepfakes with election security, it’s important to note that this is a threat that affects businesses, too.  In fact, Tim Fitzgerald, CISO at Arm, cited an incident in which his CEO was impersonated in a deepfake over Whatsapp. The ask? A request to move money. According to Tim, it was quite compelling.  Unfortunately, deepfakes are surprisingly easy to make and generation is outpacing detection. But, clear policies and procedures around authenticating and approving requests can ensure these scams aren’t successful. Not sure what a deepfake is? We cover everything you need to know in this article: Deepfakes: What Are They and Why Are They a Threat? 14. Supply chain attacks are, too  In conversation with Henry Treveleyan Thomas, Head of Customer Success at Tessian, Kevin Storli, Global CTO and UK CISO at PwC discussed how organizations with large supply chains are especially vulnerable to advanced impersonation attacks like spear phishing. “It’s one thing to ensure your own organization is secure. But, what about your supply chain? That’s a big focus for us: ensuring our supply chain has adequate security controls,” he said. Why is this so important? Because hackers know large organizations like PwC will have robust security strategies. So, they’ll look for vulnerabilities elsewhere to gain a foothold. That’s why strong cybersecurity can actually be a competitive differentiator and help businesses attract (and keep) more customers and clients.  15. People will generally make the right decisions if they’re given the right information 88% of data breaches start with people. But, that doesn’t mean people are careless or malicious. They’re just not security experts. That’s why it’s so important security leaders provide their employees with the right information at the right time. Both Sandeep Amar, CPO at MSCI and Tim Fitzgerald, CISO at Arm talked about this in detail.  It could be a guide on how to spot spear phishing attacks or – as we mentioned in point #6 – in-the-moment warnings that reinforce training.   Check out their sessions for more insights.  16. Success comes down to people While we’ve talked a lot about human error and psychological vulnerabilities, one thing was made clear throughout the Human Layer Security Summit. A business’s success is completely reliant on its people. And, we don’t just mean in terms of security. Howard Shultz, Former CEO at Starbucks, offered some incredible advice around leadership which we can all heed, regardless of our role. In particular, he recommended: Creating company values that really guide your organization Ensuring every single person understands how their role is tied to the goals of the organization Leading with truth, transparency, and humility
17. But people are dealing with a lot of anxiety right now Whether you’re a CEO or a CISO, you have to be empathetic towards your employees. And, the fact is, people are dealing with a lot of anxiety right now. Nearly every speaker mentioned this. We’re not just talking about the global pandemic.  We’re talking about racial and social inequality. Political unrest. New working environments. Bigger workloads. Mass lay-offs.  Joseph Blankenship, VP Research, Security & Risk at Forrester, summed it up perfectly, saying “We have an anxiety-ridden user base and an anxiety-ridden security base trying to work out how to secure these new environments. We call them users, but they’re actually human beings and they’re bringing all of that anxiety and stress to their work lives.” That means we all have to be human first. And, with all of this in mind, it’s clear that….. 18. The role of the CISO has changed  Sure, CISOs are – as the name suggests – responsible for security. But, to maintain security company-wide, initiatives have to be perfectly aligned with business objectives, and every individual department, team, and person has to understand the role they play. Kevin Storli, Global CTO and UK CISO at PwC touched on this in his session. “To be successful in implementing security change, you have to bring the larger organization along on the journey. How do you get them to believe in the mission? How do you communicate the criticality? How do you win the hearts and minds of the people? CISOs no longer live in the back office and address just tech aspects. It’s about being a leader and using security to drive value.” That’s a tall order and means that CISOs have to wear many hats. They need to be technology experts while also being laser-focused on the larger business. And, to build a strong security culture, they have to borrow tactics from HR and marketing.  The bottom line: The role of the CISO is more essential now than ever. It makes sense. Security is mission-critical, remember? If you’re looking for even more insights, make sure you watch the full event, which is available on-demand. You can also check out previous Human Layer Security Summits on YouTube.
Customer Stories DLP Human Layer Security
9 Questions That Will Help You Choose The Right Email Security Solution
25 August 2020
When it comes to creating a cybersecurity strategy, security leaders have a lot to consider. There are various threat vectors, dozens of “types” of data to secure, thousands of products on the market, and oftentimes limited budget to work with. But, in this article, we’re going to focus on email security. Why? Because 90% of data breaches start on email. Data could be compromised via a spear phishing attack. Malware contained in one malicious attachment could infect an entire organization’s network. Insider threats could easily exfiltrate data for financial gain simply by emailing spreadsheets to their personal email accounts.   That’s why email is the threat vector security and IT leaders are most concerned about, and it’s why choosing the right email security software is so critically important. Keep reading to learn: What nine questions you should ask when choosing an email security solution  The solutions other security leaders across industries use to protect their people on email Why Tessian may be the right email security software for you How to get buy-in from your CEO after you’ve decided what the best solution is for your organization 1. Is it easy to deploy? Cybersecurity solutions should make life easier for your employees and your IT department. And, the bottom line is, a complicated setup process wastes time and resources. Worse still, it could lead to errors in deployment which may leave your company vulnerable. That’s why email security software must be easy to deploy across your organization and it should seamlessly integrate with a variety of email clients, all without any administrative burden. Before getting too far into the sales process, make sure you find out what support the vendor will provide, how long deployment takes, and – whenever possible – talk to an existing customer to find out how their deployment was.  2. Is it scalable and customizable? As your company grows and changes, your business tools must adapt. This includes email security software, which should work for you consistently, regardless of your company’s size. If you scale up or down, your email security software should change with you. Email security software must also allow customization so that it really aligns with your risk appetite, your employees’ preferences, and your specific business context. Too little flexibility is stifling — but too much choice is overwhelming (and could be resource-intensive).  3. Does it prevent a wide range of threats? Today, cybersecurity solutions must detect and prevent a broader range of threats than ever before. And, when it comes to email security software, you have to consider both inbound and outbound threats, including: Spear phishing: A sophisticated phishing attack in which the attacker emails a specific, named target. Verizon’s 2020 data breach report shows that 96% of social attacks (like spear phishing) occur via email. Check out more statistics related to social engineering attacks on our blog. Misdirected emails: An employee accidentally emails personal or sensitive data to the wrong recipient. This happens more often than you might think. The UK’s privacy regulator cited misdirected emails as the number one cause of data breaches in quarter four of 2019-20 and, according to Tessian platform data, over 800 emails are sent to the wrong person every year in organizations with 1,000 people.  Insider Threats: A trusted employee sends confidential or sensitive data to an unauthorized recipient. This recipient can be a third-party to whom a malicious insider is leaking intellectual property — or merely an employee forwarding correspondence to their personal email. Looking for more examples? We’ve rounded up 7 real-world Insider Threat examples here. 4. Can it keep up with the evolving threat landscape? Online threats are rapidly evolving and email security software is only as good as its ability to keep pace with these threats. Whether it’s vishing, smishing, or a new type of malware, hackers are always looking for new ways to take advantage of security vulnerabilities and unsuspecting (and often untrained) employees.  Can your email security software keep up? Tessian can. Scroll down to learn how Tessian uses machine learning to automatically “learn” and evolve in tandem with the threat landscape.  5. Are employees (and data) protected across devices? Businesses are increasingly reliant on cloud computing, remote working, and home offices — particularly since the outbreak of COVID-19. It’s hard enough to protect a set of company workstations located on company premises. Trying to manage security on any number of desktop, laptop, and mobile devices — located in offices, public places, and your employees’ homes — is even harder. But, unprotected devices represent a critical vulnerability in your company’s security. That’s why the right email security solution will work on any device that employees can use to access company data. 6. Is it easy to see (and communicate) ROI? It can be tough for security leaders to communicate the ROI of cybersecurity solutions. Why? Because it’s hard to put a value on something that hasn’t happened. But, a strong email security solution will make it easy for IT teams to assess risk, review trends over time, and create reports that demonstrate how risk is downtrending over time. This way, key stakeholders can really see the impact.  Unfortunately, a lot of solutions today are a black box when it comes to investigating incidents and garnering insights. So, when choosing an email security solution, consider what reporting tools the solution offers and whether or not any manual investigation is required. Most security teams are already thinly stretched; communicating ROI shouldn’t be an added burden. 7. Is it easy for employees to use? According to new research, 51% of employees say security tools and software impede their productivity. Likewise, 54% of employees say they’ll find a workaround if security software or policies prevent them from doing their job. This proves that the most secure path also has to be the path of least resistance. If the security solution you’re considering has high flag rates, creates extra work for your employees, or isn’t user-friendly, it will go unused. This is a security risk.  In layman’s terms: security shouldn’t get in the way. 8. Does it help ensure compliance?  Increasingly strict data privacy laws are setting new standards for companies handling personal information.  Businesses are accountable for taking a proactive approach to data security. You must take every reasonable step to ensure that the personal information in your control is kept safe and you must be able to demonstrate your security measures to regulators on demand.  That means that, when evaluating potential email security solutions, you should not only understand what data loss incidents they prevent, but also which security certifications they’ve earned.  9. Has it been vetted by relevant customers and industry leaders? Before selecting an email security software provider, you must ensure that it is well-established and has testimonials from previous customers, preferably in your company’s sector. Cybersecurity is a vast industry, and too many players are inexperienced, disreputable, or downright untrustworthy. You cannot afford to take any risks in choosing an email security software provider: reputation is everything in this field. Is Tessian the right email security solution for you?
Tessian is easy to deploy Deploying Tessian couldn’t be simpler. The software integrates with all email environments, including Office 365, Microsoft Exchange, and GSuite. And, plug-and-play intelligent filters make individual customization easy. Setup is also extremely fast. Within 24 hours, Tessian analyzes an entire year’s worth of your organization’s historic email data. Immediately afterward, you’re protected.  No rules are required.  Tessian is scalable and customizable Tessian’s stateful machine learning technology is always evolving, designed to suit your business’s needs as it scales and changes over time. Tessian automatically (and continuously) analyzes each employee’s historic email behavior to learn what is and isn’t “normal” for them. That way, it knows which emails to flag as anomalous.  But, we also understand how important customization is. With Tessian Constructor, you can create and implement security rules specific to your organization. Tessian prevents a wide range of threats Across three solutions, Tessian’s Human Layer Security platform can detect and prevent inbound and outbound threats, including advanced impersonation attacks, Insider Threats, and accidental data loss via misdirected emails. Tessian keeps pace with the evolving threat landscape Tessian doesn’t rely on a list of signatures of known malware and scams. Our machine learning algorithms are actively learning all the time, which enables Tessian Defender, Guardian, and Enforcer to spot unusual activity and discover new threats. And, with Human Layer Security Intelligence, Tessian customers benefit from a sort of “herd immunity”. If a threat is detected in another environment – for example, a never-before-seen social engineering attack – Tessian’s entire community of users will automatically be protected. How? The suspicious domain will automatically be placed on a “denylist” and blocked.  Tessian protects employees and data across devices Tessian is an ideal solution for remote or hybrid work environments. It protects your employees and your company’s data on laptops, desktops, and mobile devices. Tessian makes it easy to see ROI Tessian Human Layer Security Intelligence provides security leaders with detailed, easy-to-understand and – best of all – automated threat reports. In a single click, you’ll be able to see how your risk profile has improved over a certain period of time.
Security and IT teams can also get detailed information about specific incidents. Zero manual investigation required. Want to learn more about how Tessian customers can use HLSI to improve their security posture and communicate ROI? Read this: Introducing Tessian Human Layer Security Intelligence. Tessian is easy for employees to use Tessian is incredibly easy for anyone in your company to use. In fact, Tessian barely requires any “use” at all. The software runs silently in the background without any impediment to your employees’ productivity whatsoever. Flag rates are low, warnings – when triggered – are helpful, not annoying, and our customers see a very low number of false positives. With Tessian, the most secure path is the path of least resistance. It’s one piece of security software your employees will thank you for adopting.
Tessian helps ensure compliance The key to compliance with privacy law is assessing risks to privacy and taking reasonable steps to mitigate these risks. Email represents a critical risk area in any company’s data security architecture. Tessian can assist with compliance in a way that other email security software cannot. Tessian Guardian is unique in its ability to prevent misdirected emails, which are the leading cause of data breach, according to reports by the ICO and the California Attorney-General. Given that misdirected email is such a common cause of data breaches, you must take steps to safeguard against this risk.  But, it’s also important to note that Tessian was designed with security and privacy in mind. You can learn more about our security certifications and how we ensure data privacy and protection here.  Tessian has been vetted by industry leaders Leading organizations across industries rely on Tessian to protect their people and data on email.  Here are just some of the many businesses that endorse Tessian, by sector: Legal Customers Hill Dickinson (case study) Dentons (case study) Caplin and Drysdale (case study) Financial Services Customers Webb Henderson (case study) Man Group (case study) Evercore (case study) Tech Customers Rightmove (case study) Gubra (case study) Com Lauda (case study) Insurance Customers North (case study) Healthcare Customers Laya Healthcare (case study) Tessian has also received recognition and plaudits from industry bodies and tech experts.  In May 2020, Tessian was recognized as a Cool Vendor in the Gartner Cool Vendors in Cloud Office Security report, which recognizes security solutions that “focus specifically upon securing applications, communication and data that occur within cloud office environments.” Tessian has also been independently tested by IT analyst firm 451 Research, which assessed how the software fared against its competitors in data-loss prevention. According to 451 Research’s report, Tessian’s machine learning algorithms allow it to succeed in preventing data loss where rule-based solutions fall short. 
And, most recently, Tessian was included in Forrester’s Now Tech: Report for Enterprise Email Security Providers. You can read more about why Tessian was selected here.  While there is no one-size-fits-all approach to email security, this guide should help you research and vet which solution is right for you. If you’re considering Tessian, why not book a demo to have these questions (and more) answered by one of our experts.
Not ready to book a demo yet? Learn more about your products, our customers, and our Human Layer Security vision via the links below: Why Tessian? Our Technology What is Human Layer Security? Customer Stories  Bonus: If you have decided which email security solution is right for you but you’re struggling to get buy-in from your CEO, read this guide with tips from the world’s most innovative and trusted organizations.
Customer Stories DLP Human Layer Security
Prove the Value of Cybersecurity Solutions: 16 Tips From Security Leaders
By Maddie Rosenthal
18 August 2020
As a security or IT leader, researching and vetting security solutions is step one. What’s step two, then? Convincing key stakeholders like the CEO, CFO, and the board that the product needs to be implemented, that it needs to be implemented now, and that it’s worth the cost.  This is easier said than done, especially now that organizations around the world are facing budget cuts in the wake of COVID-19. But, security is business-critical.   So, how do you communicate risk and make a compelling case to (eventually) get buy-in from executives? We talked to security leaders from some of the world’s most trusted and innovative organizations to find out what they do to get buy-in from CxOs. Here’s a summary of their tips. You can also download this infographic with a quick summary of all of the below tips. This is perfect for sharing with peers or colleagues. 1. Familiarize yourself with overall business objectives While cybersecurity has historically been a siloed department, today, it’s an absolutely essential function that supports and enables the overall business. Think about the consequences of a data breach beyond lost data. Organizations experience higher rates of customer churn, reputations are damaged, and, with regulatory fines and the cost of investigation and remediation, there can be significant revenue loss.  The key, then, is to attach cybersecurity initiatives to key business objectives. The security leaders we interviewed recommended starting by reviewing annual reports and strategic roadmaps. Then, build your business case. If customer retention and growth are KPIs for the year, insist that cybersecurity builds customer trust and is a competitive differentiator. If the organization is looking for higher profits, make it clear how much a breach would impact the company’s bottom line. (According to IBM’s latest Cost of a Data Breach, the average cost of a data breach is $3.86 million.) 2. Create specific “what-if” scenarios A lot of security solutions are bought reactively (after an incident occurs), but security leaders need to take a proactive approach. The problem is, it’s more challenging for CxOs and the board to see the value of a solution when they haven’t yet experienced any consequences without it.  As the saying goes, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it”.  That’s why security leaders have to preempt push-back to proactive pitches by outlining what the consequences would be if a solution isn’t implemented so that stakeholders can understand both probability and impact. For example, if you’re trying to get buy-in for an outbound email security solution, focus on the “what-ifs” associated with sending misdirected emails  which – by the way- are sent 800 times a year in organizations with 1,000 employees. Ask executives to imagine a situation in which their biggest clients’ most sensitive data lands in the wrong inbox.  What would happen?  Make sure you identify clear, probable consequences. That way, the situation seems possible (if not likely) instead of being an exaggerated “worst-case scenario”.  3. Work closely with the security vendor You know your business. Security vendors know their product. If you combine each of your expertise – and really lean on each other – you’ll have a much better chance of making a compelling case for a particular solution. Ask the vendor for specific resources (if they don’t exist, ask them to create them!), ask for product training, ask if you can speak with an existing customer. Whatever you need to get buy-in, ask for it. Rest assured, they’ll be happy to help.  4. Collaborate and align with other departments It takes a village and cybersecurity is a “people problem”.  That means you should reach out to colleagues in different departments for advice and other input. Talk to the folks from Risk and Compliance, Legal, HR, Operations, and Finance early on.  Get their opinion on the product’s value. Find out how it might be able to help them with their goals and initiatives. In doing so, you might even be able to pool money from other budgets. Win-win! 5. Consider how much the executive(s) really know about security To communicate effectively, you have to speak the same language. And, we don’t just mean English versus French. We mean really getting on the same level as whomever you’re in conversation with. But, to do that, you have to first know how much your audience actually knows about the topic you’re discussing. For example, if you look into your CEO’s background and find out that he or she studied computer science, you’ll be able to get away with some technical jargon. But, if their background is limited to business studies, you’ll want to keep it simple. Avoid security-specific acronyms and – whatever you do – don’t bury the point underneath complex explanations of processes.  In short: Don’t succumb to the Curse of Knowledge. 
6. Use analogies to put costs into perspective  One of the best ways to avoid the Curse of Knowledge and give abstract ideas a bit more context is to use analogies. It could be the ROI of a product or the potential cost of a breach. Either way, analogies can make big, somewhat meaningless numbers more tangible and impactful. For example, imagine you’re trying to convince your CFO that the cost of a solution is worth it. But, the 6-digit, one-time cost is a hard sell. What do you do? Break the overall cost down by the product’s lifespan. Then, divide that number by the number of employees it will protect during that same period.  Suddenly, the cost will seem more manageable and worth the investment. 7. Invite key stakeholders to events or webinars  Before you even start pitching a particular solution, warm-up executives with educational webinars or events that aren’t product-specific. This will give CxOs a chance to better understand the problem, how it might apply to them, and how other people/organizations are finding solutions. Bear in mind: most vendors will have at least 1 (generally 2+) webinars or events during the standard sales cycle. Looking for events to attend? We’ve put together this list of 20 cybersecurity and business events – including Tessian Human Layer Security Summit – perfect for inviting your non-technical colleagues to.  8. Prepare concise and personalized briefing materials Individual stakeholders will be more likely to consider a particular solution if the problem it solves is directly relevant to them. How? Combine tips #1, #2, #3, and #5. After taking some time to understand the business’ overall objectives, take a closer look at individual peoples’ roles and responsibilities in meeting those objectives. Then, dig a bit deeper into how much they know about cybersecurity. Imagine you’re meeting with a COO with some technical experience whose focus is on maintaining relationships with customers. His or her briefing documents should contain minimal technical jargon and should focus on how a data breach affects customer churn.  The bottom line: make it about them. 9. Share these documents in advance of any formal meetings While this may seem obvious, the security leaders we spoke to made it clear that this is an essential step in getting buy-in. No one wants to feel caught off guard, unprepared, or rushed.  To avoid all of the above, make sure you share any documents relevant to the solution well in advance of any formal meetings. But, don’t just dump the documents on their desk or in their inbox. Outline exactly what each document is, why it’s relevant to the meeting, and what the key takeaways are. You want to do whatever you can to help them absorb the information, so make sure you make yourself available after sharing the documents and before the meeting, just in case they have any questions or need additional information. 10. Build a strong security culture Before we dive into why building a strong security culture can help you get buy-in, we want to make it clear that this isn’t something that can happen overnight. This is a long-term goal that requires the help of the entire organization. Yes, everyone. So, how do you build a strong security culture? Start by ensuring that security and IT teams are committed to helping – not blaming – employees. There has to be a certain level of mutual trust and respect.  Beyond that, employees have to accept responsibility for the overall security of the organization. They have to understand that their actions – whether it’s clicking on a phishing email or using a weak password – have consequences.  If they do accept this responsibility, and if they genuinely care about following policies and procedures and helping secure data and networks, high-level executives will care, too. They’ll therefore be more likely to sign-off on solutions. 11. Keep an eye on security trends outside of your industry  Some industries – specifically Healthcare, Financial Services, and Legal – are bound to compliance standards that formalize the need for effective security solutions. That means that, compared to other industries like Retail or Manufacturing, they’ll be required to have more robust strategies in place. What they’re doing now, the rest of us will be doing in 12 months. Keep this in mind. If you notice that organizations operating in the most highly regulated industries are all taking data loss prevention (DLP) seriously, you’ll be able to make a strong case that this is something that should be on your radar, too. 12. Approach non-executive stakeholders early on While – yes – getting buy-in from CxOs and the board is important, security leaders also need to get buy-in from non-executive stakeholders working in IT, infrastructure, etc.  After all, those are the people who will actually be responsible for deploying the solution and maintaining it.By approaching them early on (and assuming they’re interested in the solution, too) you’ll be able to paint a clear picture of the process after the solution has been signed off on.  How long will it take? Who’s involved? Will employees’ workflow be disrupted? These are all important questions to answer.  13. Match like-for-like people from both sides If you’re scheduling a meeting with executives from your side and key people from the vendor’s side, make sure you’re bringing in people that “match” in terms of function and seniority level. For example, if you work at a start-up and the founder of your company wants to be involved in the buying process, ask the vendor’s founders to join, too. Likewise, if the Head of Infrastructure is joining from your side, ask someone in a similar function to join from the other side. Why? Like-for-like people will be best placed to answer one another’s questions.  And, with that in mind…. 14. Preempt questions and prepare answers No one likes to be put on the spot. To avoid being asked a question that you don’t know the answer to, spend a good amount of time considering all the questions different stakeholders may ask and drafting well-thought-out answers. (Better yet, fit the answers into briefing documents or the presentation itself!) Remember, people are generally concerned with how a problem/solution affects them directly. That means the CEO will have different questions than the CFO, who will have different questions than the Head of IT.  15. Get specific customer references from the vendor We mentioned in tip #3 that you should lean on the vendor, especially when it comes to specific resources and customer references. And, we mentioned in tip #11 that you should match like-for-like people in meetings. It should make sense, then, that specific customer references will be more powerful than generic ones. For example, if you’re the CISO at a 4,000-person tech firm in North America, and you’re trying to convince you’re CTO that you need to implement a new solution, you should share a case study (or customer reference) from the vendor that outlines how their product has helped an organization in the same industry, that’s the same size, and in the same region. Ideally, it will also feature quotes from the CTO. Why? Professionals trust and rely on their peers when making difficult decisions. 16. Be conscious (and considerate of) peoples’ time  Decisions about security solutions can involve a lot of different people. That means you’ll have to balance several conflicting schedules and fight for time. Your best bet? Book meetings with all relevant people at once and get the vendor involved at the same time. Ahead of the meeting, share an agenda along with any relevant documents (see tip #8).  Are you a security leader who wants to offer advice to your peers? We’d love to hear from you! Please get in touch with [email protected] And, if you’re looking for more advice, check out these blogs: How to Communicate Cybersecurity ROI Advice from Security Leaders for Security Leaders: How to Navigate New Remote-Working Challenges How to Create an Enduring and Flexible Cybersecurity Strategy
Customer Stories DLP Human Layer Security
Data Leakage and Exfiltration: 7 Problems Tessian Helps Solve
03 August 2020
On Wednesday, July 29, Tessian hosted a webinar with two customers: Euromoney Institutional Investor and ERT. The topic? Data exfiltration and reduced visibility while workforces are remote. Martyn Booth, Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) at Euromoney Institutional Investor and Ted Crawford, Chief Information Officer (CIO) at ERT both offered incredible insights about how things have changed from a security perspective over the last four months and how Tessian has helped them lock down email, even before their employees started working from home. And, because Martyn and Ted are two security leaders in different industries (Financial Services and Tech/Healthcare respectively) and are based in different regions (England and The United States), they were able to share diverse opinions and experiences. Keep reading to learn more about how Tessian has helped them solve some of their biggest pain points.  7 Problems Tessian Helps Solve 1. Tessian prevents accidental data loss on email When you hear data exfiltration, what do you think of?  Many of you probably thought immediately about Insider Threats and other malicious activity. But, as our customers pointed out, most incidents involving data loss are accidental. Or, as Martyn put it, are the result of “naive email usage”. It could be an employee sending an email to the wrong person (we call this a misdirected email), it could be someone hitting “reply all”, or it could be someone emailing a spreadsheet to their personal email account to work on over the weekend.  Harmless, right? Not exactly. If these “accidents” involve sensitive information related to employees, customers, clients, or the company itself, it’s considered a breach.  Organizations can prevent all of the above with Tessian Guardian.  This is especially important now that employees are working remotely. Why? Because the lines between peoples’ personal and professional lives are blurred. Beyond that, people are distracted, stressed, and tired which, as we’ve shown in our latest research report The Psychology of Human Error, increases the likelihood that a mistake will happen. 2. Tessian prevents malicious data exfiltration on email While, many data loss incidents are accidental, some employees do intentionally exfiltrate data. There are a number of reasons why, but financial gain and a competitive edge are the most likely motivators.  Unfortunately, with so many people being laid off, made redundant, or furloughed, many organizations have seen a spike in this type of malicious activity. But, with Tessian Enforcer, organizations’ most sensitive data is kept safe.  Employees attempting to email sensitive information to themselves or a suspicious third-party will receive a warning message, explaining why the email has been flagged and asking if they’re sure they want to proceed. At the same time, security teams will get a notification.
Note: Instead of warning the employee and asking if they’d like to send the email anyway, security teams can easily configure Tessian to automatically quarantine emails that look like data exfiltration. Book a demo to see Tessian in action.  3. Tessian makes it easy to report security risks and communicate ROI  Communicating cybersecurity ROI has historically been a real challenge for security leaders. Not with Tessian. Martyn explained how Tessian enables him to share key results with executives and demonstrate the effectiveness of not just the solution, but his overall strategy. “One of the pillars of our infrastructure strategy was to build transparency across the organization. This comes from sharing metrics. With Tessian, we can show how many alerts were picked up and, each month, we can show the risk committee that we’re reducing the number of alerts. Now, are they actually interested in our preventative controls? I don’t think so. But the whole point of the metrics program is to show how well (or badly) our strategy is performing.  Before, they would make their decision based on cost or how much risk they thought we were going to be mitigating. It was quite subjective. We’ve moved that now into something more data-based. We can actually say “Well, actually, we pay x per year and, as a result of that, we’re going in the right direction in terms of our risk mitigations.” 4. Tessian helps organizations stay compliant  Both Healthcare and Financial Services are highly regulated industries that are bound to several compliance standards beyond GDPR.  That’s why, for Ted, protecting sensitive clinical data and ensuring “privacy and security by design” are both paramount. “There’s a lot of data that we need to protect and prevent from getting outside of the four walls of ERT,” he said. “As an offshoot of GDPR in 2018, we had to classify all of the data, determine from a privacy perspective how to treat it from a sensitivity perspective, and then decide how to treat it from a security perspective. Because it’s very easy to pull sensitive data and incur data loss on email, we needed a solution that would help us ensure data isn’t distributed where it shouldn’t go. That’s why we approached Tessian.” For more information about compliance in Financial Services, check out this article: Ultimate Guide to Data Protection and Compliance in Financial Services.
5. Tessian saves security teams time  While essential for compliance, classifying (and re-classifying) data, monitoring movement, investigating incidents, and generating reports all take a lot of time. That’s why 85% of IT leaders say rule-based DLP is admin-intensive.  With Tessian, security teams don’t have to do any of the above manually. This is a big selling point for Martyn, who said, “That’s where we really see the value with Tessian. It takes the burden off of people in my security team.” Tessian is powered by machine learning algorithms that have been trained on billions of data points. That means our solutions automatically understand what is and isn’t normal behavior for individual employees and can, therefore, detect and prevent threats before they turn into incidents or breaches. No rules required.  You can read more about our technology here.  6. Tessian gives security teams clear visibility of risks We’ve talked a lot about how Tessian detects and prevents risks. But for a solution to be really successful, it has to give security teams clear visibility of the risks in their organization. Tessian’s Human Layer Security platform does both.  With Tessian Human Layer Security Intelligence, our customers can easily and automatically get detailed insights into employee’s actions.  For example, imagine that in a single week, Tessian detects 12 different employees attempting to send sensitive information to their personal email accounts. When warned that sending the email is against company policy, nine of the employees opted to not send the email. The other three went ahead. Knowing this, security leaders can focus their efforts on the three that went ahead and offer additional, targeted training or, if necessary, they can escalate the incident to a line manager to issue a more formal warning.  This also helps predict future behavior. For example, if Tessian flags that an employee has sent upwards of 20 attachments – including Intellectual Property that would be valuable to a competitor – to a recipient he or she has no previous email history with soon after being denied a raise or promotion, security teams could infer that the employee is resigning and taking company data with them.  And, to prevent any further data exfiltration attempts, they can create custom filters specifically for that user, including customized warning messages or a filter that automatically blocks future exfiltration attempts. Before Tessian, this wasn’t possible for Martyn.  “Even if we suspected that an employee was going to go to a competitor and take data, we couldn’t check. We couldn’t see anything that was going up to the Cloud. It was all encrypted. The only way we would be able to see what people were emailing would be to actually go through individual emails to find ones that were problematic. We didn’t have time for that,” he said. 
7. Tessian helps reinforce training and improve employee’s security reflexes with in-the-moment warnings In the example above, three employees opted to send an email after being warned that doing so would be against company policy. But, what about the other nine? The warning message changed their behavior! It actually incentivized them to accurately mark emails as confidential or malicious if they were, in fact, confidential or malicious. This is really important. “You can’t take a ‘big bang’ approach to data privacy awareness training. To really see employees empowered, you have to constantly reinforce training,” Ted said.  The bottom line: For training to be effective long-term, employees need to apply what they learn to real-world situations and be reminded of policies in-the-moment. Over time, this will help improve their security reflexes and help build a more positive security culture.  Henry Trevelyan Thomas, the host of the webinar and Tessian’s Head of Customer Success, summarized the benefits of this for both employees and security leaders, “This is a really productive way to help employees take accountability for how they handle data. It democratizes security and takes some of the weight off of the Chief Information Security Officer’s shoulders.” Tessian can help prevent data exfiltration in your organization, too Tessian turns an organization’s email data into its best defense against inbound and outbound email security threats. Powered by machine learning, our Human Layer Security technology understands human behavior and relationships, enabling it to automatically detect and prevent anomalous and dangerous activity. Tessian Enforcer detects and prevents data exfiltration attempts Tessian Guardian detects and prevents misdirected emails Importantly, Tessian’s technology automatically updates its understanding of human behavior and evolving relationships through continuous analysis and learning of the organization’s email network. Oh, and it works silently in the background, meaning employees can do their jobs without security getting in the way.  Interested in learning more about how Tessian can help prevent accidental data loss and data exfiltration in your organization? You can read some of our customer stories here or book a demo.
Customer Stories DLP Human Layer Security Spear Phishing
13 Things We Learned at Tessian Virtual Human Layer Security Summit
18 June 2020
Tessian’s Virtual Human Layer Security Summit was an incredible success thanks to our partners, speakers, and – of course – all of those who attended. Over 1,000 security, IT, compliance, business, and HR professionals watched as we explored how business models have changed, what these changes mean for all of us, and what to expect over the next several months. If you weren’t able to tune into the Summit yesterday, don’t worry! You can watch the full video below or access it on-demand. We’ve summarized some of the key points into relevant and actionable advice. Share these with your co-workers, share them on social media, or bookmark this blog for yourself. Here’s what we learned at Tessian Virtual Human Layer Security Summit.
1. We must treat our employees with empathy and compassion.  While the event was focused on cybersecurity and tech, one of the most important takeaways from the day is about being human. The Summit kicked off with an important reminder from Bobby Ford, Vice President and Global CISO at Unilever: “We’re not just working from home, we’re working from home during a crisis.” While – yes – we’re all trying to conduct “business as usual”, all of us are dealing with unique challenges. Many parents have suddenly taken on the roles of teachers, and living rooms have been transformed into makeshift co-working spaces for partners and roommates. And this doesn’t even account for the emotional stress of a global pandemic and current social and political unrest.  There’s a lot to navigate, process, and overcome, and many of us are distracted, stressed, and anxious. And that’s okay. As leaders and as humans, we have to be empathetic and compassionate. We have to take the mental wellbeing of our employees seriously and give them the tools, resources, and support they need to thrive, wherever they’re working.
2. The secure thing to do should be the easiest thing to do.  Let’s face it. Security isn’t the average employee’s top priority. They just want to do their job. Over half (54%) of employees say they’ll find a workaround if security software or policies make it difficult or prevent them from doing their job.  That’s why it’s so important that we implement policies, procedures, and tech that’s frictionless.  Bobby put this into perspective with an example from his own life.  When you’re a parent helping your son or daughter learn how to walk, what do you do? Child-proof the house and get outta the way! That’s what we need to be doing as security leaders. Make sure the most secure path is the path of least resistance, whether that’s ensuring your employees have a secure way to print and dispose of documents or implementing flexible BYOD policies.  3. Detection and prevention alone aren’t enough.  We all work hard to detect and prevent both inbound and outbound threats. And, while even that isn’t always easy, that’s not our only job. We also have to have to maintain visibility of risks, manage teams that are often thinly stretched, move quickly from investigation to remediation, and communicate threats to executive teams.  Almost impossible, right? Not anymore.  Tessian’s Group Product Manager, Harry Wetherald and Product Marketing Manager, Shanthi Shambathkumar, announced some very exciting news during the Summit: the launch of Human Layer Security Intelligence. With HLS Intelligence, security leaders can now predict, prevent, and protect against threats with zero manual investigation. That means you can continuously and proactively downtrend risks in your organization. Want to learn more? We outline all the benefits of Human Layer Security Intelligence and explore use cases on our blog: Introducing Tessian Human Layer Security Intelligence. 4. Executive teams must invest in security now.  While cybersecurity has historically been a siloed department, it’s becoming more and more integrated with overall business functions. In fact, it can actually be a business enabler and a unique selling point for customers and prospects.  But, only if your organization is secure. And, as Clive Novis, Chief IT Risk Officer at Investec pointed out, it takes a village to ensure data is protected which means cybersecurity initiatives must get support from senior executives first. During the customer panel discussion, he said “The tone is set from the top in terms of the security culture. They help ensure not only that controls are effective, but that those controls are consistent across the globe.” Needless to say, this is more important now than ever. As we continue to adapt to new remote and hybrid working structures, many of us are introducing new policies and solutions and we need buy-in across departments for these policies and solutions to work. 5. Email is the #1 threat vector.  Over the last few months, we’ve heard a lot about the dangers of Zoombombing. But, we’ve heard even more about COVID-19 themed phishing attacks, Tax Day scams, and 2020 Census scams. (Jump to #7 for more information.) With that said, email is the threat vector most security and IT leaders are concerned about.
It makes sense. Over 124 billion business emails are sent and received every day and employees spend 40% of their time on email sharing memos, spreadsheets, invoices, and other sensitive information and unstructured data. It’s a gold mine. The bottom line: We need to be leveling up our DLP efforts on email. 6. Security incidents are happening up to 38x more than IT leaders currently estimate.  During the Summit, Tessian Co-founder and CEO Tim Sadler presented some of the key findings from our most recent report The State of Data Loss Prevention 2020. Our research reveals that data loss on email is a bigger problem than most realize, that remote-working brings new challenges around DLP, and that the solutions currently deemed most effective may actually be the least. While we addressed the frequency of misdirected emails and malicious data exfiltration, one of the most startling facts involves employees sending company data to personal email accounts.  At Tessian, we call these unauthorized emails, and according to our platform data, they’re being sent 27,500 times a year in organizations with 1,000 employees. Meanwhile, IT leaders estimate just 720 are sent. That’s a big difference and highlights the need for effective data loss prevention solutions.  Follow the links to learn more about how Tessian detects and prevents accidental data loss and data exfiltration attempts.  7. Phishing is still a big problem.  While phishing has always been a problem for organizations, we’ve seen a marked spike in incidents over the last few months. And it’s not just Tessian who has taken note. Elvis Chan, Supervisory Special Agent, National Security at the FBI has, too.  For him, phishing is the biggest risk.
What does this mean for you? Continue educating your employees about the risks associated with phishing and how to spot these attacks and ensure they’re protected with tech.  8. Security policies don’t stick unless they’re continuously reinforced.  We’ve said it before, but we’ll say it again: The average employee doesn’t care about security as much as you do. They just want to do their job. That means we have to continuously reinforce security policies, especially now that workforces are distributed.  But, repetition isn’t enough.  We have to communicate in terms our employees understand. Angela Henry, Business Information Security Officer at Rand Merchant Bank, recommends educating employees on business data privacy best practice alongside consumer data privacy best practice. Share tips that are relevant to their personal lives. Offer advice on how to keep their children secure online. Prepare resources around how to stay safe on e-commerce sites. Not only does this help foster a positive security culture in the office, but it also helps employees stay safe and secure at home.  9. …And policies aren’t effective unless they’re bolstered by technology.  While educating employees about policies is a vital part of any security strategy, it isn’t enough to prevent inbound and outbound threats and subsequent data breaches.  After all, we’re only human. We break the rules, make mistakes, and can be easily tricked. In fact, 44% of breaches are caused by human error. Elvis summed it up nicely when he said, “Even if we’re at technology 5.0, we’re still at human being 1.0.”  So, what do we do? Garrett recommends bolstering training with technology to ensure that people aren’t the last line of defense, saying “My ultimate view is that user awareness training is fine but – in mathematical terms – it’s necessary but not sufficient. I think it needs to be used in conjunction with other tools.” 10. Security needs diversity to thrive.  Throughout the Human Layer Security Summit, we talked a lot about security pre- and post-pandemic. But, Merrit Baer, Principal Security Architect at Amazon Web Services pointed out something else we shouldn’t forget.
She’s right. Cybersecurity needs diversity to thrive.  This diversity isn’t limited to gender or ethnic diversity. The field is wide open for a range of educational and professional backgrounds, from psychology majors to business analysts and just about everything in between.  You can read more about the opportunities available in cybersecurity in our report Opportunity in Cybersecurity 2020. 11. Remote working isn’t temporary. According to a recent poll by 451 Research, 38% of businesses expect work-from-home strategies will continue post-pandemic. And, when you consider companies like Facebook have already announced they’re permanently embracing remote-work, we should expect more to follow. The point? We should equip our workforces to thrive at home and ensure that we’re maintaining a strong security culture company-wide while also supporting our employees mentally and emotionally. (See #1.)  12. …And that doesn’t have to be a bad thing.  There are new and perennial challenges we must overcome in order to support a full-time remote workforce, but there are a number of benefits, too. Don’t take our word for it. Stephane Kasriel, Former CEO of Upwork – a company that has maintained a hybrid remote-working structure across 500 cities for nearly a decade – offered attendees of the Summit several reasons why this is something to look forward to, not dread.  To start, remote-working enables companies to find and work with the best talent, not just local talent. Beyond that, employees have more freedom to design their lives. They can more easily balance work and life, relocate as and when they need or want to, and create environments in which they can really thrive.  13. The Secret? Adapt, adopt, evolve. Repeat.  If there’s one thing that was made clear throughout every panel discussion, fireside chat, and interview, it’s that things have changed and will continue to change. The only way to succeed is to adapt and evolve. Adopt new technologies. Embrace new ways of working. Lean on peers and professional networks for advice.  In the spirit of change, we’ve put together a list of resources that will help you navigate security and business challenges of the present and future.  Security During Uncertainty: 6 Steps Security Leaders Can Take to Reduce Risk Cyber Culture in the Time of COVID COVID-19 and the Digital Pandemic Upwork Remote Work Resources COVID-19: Real-Life Examples of Phishing Emails 13 Cybersecurity Sins When Working Remotely Advice From Security Leaders for Security Leaders: How to Navigate New Remote-Working Challenges Remote-Worker’s Guide To: Preventing Data Loss 11 Tools to Help You Stay Secure and Productive While Working Remotely Did we miss anything? Feel free to email [email protected] with your key learnings.
Customer Stories
Keeping Sensitive Client Data Safe
20 April 2020
With a strong focus on protecting client data, leading international legal business, DAC Beachcroft LLP has adopted Tessian’s machine intelligent email security platform to support the firm’s new cyber security strategy. Being deployed across its offices in Europe, Asia Pacific and Latin America, the platform will help prevent the firm’s 2,500 employees from sending misdirected emails that could potentially lead to loss of confidential client data. DAC Beachcroft LLP is leading the move towards legal firms becoming more digitally focused with security being at the forefront of that movement. It looked to Tessian to offer a platform that would not only give employees peace of mind when handling sensitive client data but allowed staff to be more flexible when using email on the move across any device or operating system (OS). The platform also delivered a solution that was quick to install with minimal disruption and was easy to use for busy lawyers and support teams alike. “Our staff deal with highly sensitive client data on a daily basis and we wanted to be able to support the teams to work with that personal information confidently without the fear of a data breach,” comments, Andrew Keith, COO, DAC Beachcroft LLP. “Just by having the Tessian platform in place has significantly reduced risks at DAC Beachcroft LLP within just four weeks. It captures what could potentially be a massive data breach, and the benefits have been almost immediately recognized by all at the firm.” David Aird, IT Director DAC Beachcroft LLP, continues; “Our lawyers are busy with client work, and the simplicity of the platform has meant they and their support staff don’t have to worry about simple human errors such as entering the wrong email address.  The Tessian platform stood out from other solutions on the market because its machine learning approach meant we could automatically protect the firm from misdirected emails, unauthorized emails and non-compliance on the network.” Tessian uses machine intelligence to understand normal email communication patterns in order to automatically identify email security threats, without the need for end user behavior change or pre-defined rules and policies. “DAC Beachcroft LLP is one of the leading legal firms to create a digital environment for its network. The firm has invested time and money in the best security solutions to protect client data and its staff from potential serious email breaches. We’re delighted to be part of that move to become a secure digital business and see a long partnership ahead,” comments Tim Sadler, CEO of Tessian. Learn more about how Tessian prevents human error on email Tessian is building the world’s first Human Layer Security platform to automatically secure all human-digital interactions within the enterprise. Today, our filters use stateful machine learning to protect people using email and to prevent threats like spear phishing, accidental data loss, data exfiltration and other non-compliant email activity. To book a demo and learn more about how we can help your organization, click here.
Customer Stories Human Layer Security
Cybersecurity Awareness Should Be People-Centric, Too
13 March 2020
The first speaker at Tessian Human Layer Security Summit on March 5 was Mark Lodgson, Head of Cyber Assurance and Oversight at Prudential.  He started his presentation by citing three fundamental flaws in cybersecurity awareness training: It’s boring It’s often irrelevant  It’s expensive 
So, should we do away with it entirely? Not quite. Cybersecurity training is a necessary evil Cybersecurity professionals who implement training programs and employees who take part in these training programs can no doubt attest that the three flaws Mark mentioned are an unfortunate reality.  But, what’s the solution? Training is, after all, a necessity. Without it, employees would rely entirely on often small and overworked IT and cybersecurity teams to prevent incidents and mitigate the consequences afterward.  That’s not just a tall order; it’s completely unfeasible, especially when human error is the most prevalent cause of data breaches. That means every individual must be held accountable.  By educating employees about data privacy laws, password best practices, and how to spot phishing scams, cybersecurity becomes the collective responsibility of the organization, not just those who have a relevant title. With that said, Mark isn’t suggesting that organizations do away with cybersecurity awareness training. Instead, he’s saying that in order for it to be effective, it needs to be aligned to the individual business.  To do that, you have to get to know the business, the people in it, and their attitudes towards security. And, according to Mark, the best indicator of future behavior is confidence. The cybersecurity culture survey
Influenced by the work of Phillip Tetlock, Mark created a survey with predictive power. But, unlike your average survey that simply gauges knowledge, this survey gauges confidence.  Importantly, the survey focused on five key competencies: Business focus Cyber risk assessment Policy and best practice Cybersecurity advocacy Personal practice The thought process is simple: a survey respondent who answers a question incorrectly with 100% confidence is just as likely to make a mistake as a survey respondent who answers a question correctly with less than 100% confidence. Both responses signal the potential for equally risky behaviors. Beyond that, though, the responses – either correct or incorrect – represent an area that requires targeted training and intervention. How can you apply this to your cybersecurity strategy? While Mark shared the results of the survey he conducted (which you can see by watching the full presentation on our YouTube channel) his findings won’t help cybersecurity professionals fine-tune their own training. The key here is that awareness training needs to be customized.  Without gauging not just the knowledge but the confidence of your employees, you’re essentially blind to the cybersecurity risks within your organization. And, of course, your efforts run the risk of being deemed “boring”, “irrelevant”, and “expensive” with no tangible upside. For more insights garnered from Tessian Human Layer Security Summit, click here.  #HumanLayerSecuritySummit20  
Customer Stories
Mitigating the Risk of Data Exfiltration in a Regulated Industry
19 February 2020
McMillan Williams Solicitors (MW) is a British consumer high street law firm. It is a top 10 conveyancing law firm, operating across the south of England with a mission to provide accessible, affordable, inclusive, innovative and personal legal services. MW Solicitors is protecting 450 employees with Tessian Guardian, Tessian Enforcer and Tessian Constructor.
Making security a priority MW Solicitors provides legal advice to clients across the UK. Chief Information Officer David Fazakerley is responsible for ensuring that the firm’s IT infrastructure is efficient and fit for purpose. With over 1,000 new clients every month, protecting client data is a top priority.  Due to the high volume of clients, MW Solicitors’ attorneys must be efficient when tending to client needs. David notes that because of the pace of work, “mistakes can easily happen on email, especially due to features like autocomplete, which can lead to an email being accidentally sent to the wrong person.” David identified misdirected and unauthorized emails as two key problems that could compromise the firm’s data security.  What’s more, from a compliance point of view, data loss and exfiltration can cause significant issues for law firms, resulting in many hours spent on incident management and potentially having to file a report to the ICO. Seeking a solution that would ensure that their sensitive data remains secured, MW Solicitors turned to Tessian.
Efficiently mitigating the risk of data loss Tessian’s ability to easily integrate into MW Solicitors’ layered security system without having an impact on the infrastructure was a key benefit for the firm’s Risk and Compliance team. Tessian produced positive results shortly after deployment.  MW Solicitors deployed Tessian Guardian to prevent accidental data loss due to misdirected emails. One of the most common mistakes that can lead to a misdirected email is an employee inputting the wrong client email into a case management system. “This can be as simple as putting in hotmail.com instead of hotmail.co.uk,” notes Charlotte Mays, Compliance and Data Protection Manager. This is a problem because case management systems are unable to recognize such mistakes. Tessian Guardian can prevent emails from being sent to an incorrect address saved in the case management system. It does this by analyzing the firm’s historical email data in order to understand sending patterns and relationships between contacts. By learning what the “normal” or correct email address is from previous communications, Tessian Guardian can automatically identify the abnormal email address and notify the user that the incorrect recipient has been included in the email.  MW Solicitors also deployed Tessian Enforcer to prevent data exfiltration by email to personal or non-business domains. Tessian Enforcer understands the difference between authorized and unauthorized accounts by looking at emails that each employee has sent and received in the past in order to identify non-business contacts. If an employee sends an email to an unauthorized account, Charlotte and her team are now able to easily detect this. This has been “a huge improvement, as before it might have been difficult to even identify the employee in the first place,” notes Charlotte. MW Solicitors’ Risk and Compliance team are now able to review the Tessian dashboard to see in real time if data has been sent to unsafe destinations. 
Building a culture of transparency David aims to build a culture of transparency when it comes to data security. If all employees have an understanding of the security solutions in place, David believes that this will improve employee awareness and accountability. As MW Solicitors continues to grow, highlighting the importance of data security will be vital.  Human error is a constant, but if employees are armed with the right tools to prevent mistakes from occurring in the first place, then damage can be minimized or avoided altogether.  Learn more about how Tessian prevents human error on email Tessian is building the world’s first Human Layer Security platform to automatically secure all human-digital interactions within the enterprise. Today, our filters use stateful machine learning to protect people using email and to prevent threats like spear phishing, accidental data loss, data exfiltration and other non-compliant email activity. To book a demo and learn more about how we can help your organization, click here.
Customer Stories
Strengthening Security in Biotechnology
11 February 2020
Gubra is a Danish biotechnology company that was founded in 2008. Gubra focuses on preclinical contract research services and drug discovery programs within the metabolic space. The organization has established itself across the globe as a highly professional and competent partner within academia, biotechnology and the pharmaceutical industry. Gubra is protecting 160 employees with Tessian Defender and Tessian Guardian.
Taking security seriously Gubra is a Danish preclinical contract research organization that specializes in model building and drug testing for a variety of metabolic diseases. Chief Technology Officer Morten Høgholm Pedersen oversees IT development, implementation and operations. With many of the globe’s largest pharmaceutical companies as customers, ensuring that Gubra’s IT systems remain secure is a top priority. Many of Gubra’s clients are very sensitive to data security due to the nature of the biotechnology industry. Therefore, it is imperative that their information remains safeguarded within the organization. “We share data via password protected fileshare solutions. So even though sensitive data would not be compromised, misdirected emails that employees could accidentally send would still seem unprofessional and undermine our reputation,” says Morten. Additionally, with the rise in spear phishing attacks, Gubra also needed a solution that would better protect the organization from inbound threats on email. Gubra turned to Tessian.
Upholding credibility through secured systems Tessian was successfully implemented into Gubra’s security stack. Administered by Gubra’s IT team and overseen by Morten, Tessian gives Gubra transparency into their email security. Gubra is now protected from accidental data loss due to misdirected emails with the implementation of Tessian Guardian. For Gubra, the most powerful feature is Tessian Guardian’s ability to automatically identify an abnormal email address and notify users in real time that the potentially wrong recipient has been included. “The pop-up warning that tells people they could be sending an email to the wrong person has had a learning effect on the organization,” notes Morten. For Gubra, Tessian Guardian has led employees to become even more cautious. Many spear phishing attempts try to lure employees into paying fake invoices; and attackers are convincingly impersonating familiar parties. For Morten, the biggest concern for the organization is maintaining data security and credibility. Tessian Defender automatically prevents advanced impersonation-based spear phishing attacks by using stateful machine learning models to analyze historical email data and understand relationship context. Tessian Defender can detect impersonation from both internal and external parties and is helping Gubra defend itself from inbound threats.
Staying vigilant in a changing environment Human error is inevitable, and people will make mistakes on email, but they can be mitigated if the right tools are in place. For Morten, “it should be a standard for all companies to have a high degree of protection using the most advanced tools available against phishing attempts and misdirected emails.” With attackers getting more sophisticated with their tactics, it will be important for organizations to stay proactive with their security strategy. Gubra can now ensure that their clients’ sensitive data remains secured.
Learn more about how Tessian prevents human error on email Tessian is building the world’s first Human Layer Security platform to automatically secure all human-digital interactions in the enterprise. Today, our filters use stateful machine learning to protect people using email and to prevent threats like spear phishing, accidental data loss, data exfiltration and other non-compliant email activity. To book a demo and learn more about how we can help your organization, click here.
Customer Stories DLP Human Layer Security
Insights on Human Layer Security from Tim Fitzgerald, CISO of Arm
23 January 2020
In case you missed it, on January 22 Tim Sadler, Tessian’s CEO and co-founder, hosted our first webinar of the year which explored the biggest threat to an organization’s security: its employees. To understand the risk of human error in the workplace and how Tessian’s Human Layer Security platform is able to mitigate that risk, Tim S. was joined by Tim Fitzgerald, the CISO of Arm for a live Q&A. Before joining Arm over two years ago, Tim F. served as the CSO of Symantec for over five years. He has a special interest in digital data and human security. Arm is a customer of Tessian’s, and has deployed Tessian Defender,  Tessian Guardian, and Tessian Constructor. Consequently, Tim F. is not just attuned to the security risks associated with employees making mistakes, he understands how best to combat those risks. While you can listen to the full webinar and Q&A on-demand here, below are some of the key takeaways from Tim Fitzgerald. Where does risk really exist? Tim Fitzgerald: “It is very ‘sexy’ in security to talk about big hacking groups and use that as justification to invest in security. And there’s a lot of legitimacy behind that. But the other side of the narrative – which we spend more time on now than nation-state type threats – is how do we not do it to ourselves? Because now we’re more often dealing with avoidable events caused by predictable human error.” “I think, in general, not only should we be talking to our senior executives and boards more clearly about where real risk exists – which for most companies is the human layer – but we also need to be doing more to help these people combat the problem rather than just passing blame.” To err is human, but people are (generally) well-intentioned TF: “I very much chafe at the idea that we think of our employees as the weakest link. It underserves peoples’ intent and how they choose to operate. Rather than that, we try to take a look in the mirror and say ‘What are we not providing our employees to help them avoid these type of scenarios?’” “At Arm, we take the ‘people-are-people’ view. Not that they’re the weakest link; not that they don’t come with good intent; or that they don’t want to be good at their job; or that they take shortcuts just to get that extra moment of productivity. But, actually, everyone wants to do a good job and our job is to arm them with both the knowledge and the tools to be able to keep themselves secure, rather than trying to secure around them.” The role of a CISO is people-centric TF: “I view my job in human security as somewhere between a sociology and a marketing experiment. We’re really trying to change peoples’ behaviors in a moment. Not universally, not their personal viewpoints. But will they make the right decision in this moment to do something that won’t create security risk for us? Evolving that strategy relies not just on how we influence behavior in that moment of time, but actually, can we change their ethos? Can we make responsible security decision-making part of everybody’s job?” “Security is ultimately my responsibility. But, we very much rely on what we consider our extended security team, which is all of our employees. Our view is that they can undo all the good that we’ve done behind them to try to compensate for the risk that normal human beings create.” Security solutions should empower employees TF: “By far the biggest single challenge we have is Arm’s ethos around information sharing. We have a belief – that has proven to be true – that this level of information sharing has allowed Arm to be extraordinarily successful and innovative. There’s no backing up from that, and that represents a huge amount of challenge; that level of information sharing is quite difficult to manage. “Rather than saying people are an intractable problem and therefore we can’t conquer this, if we start thinking about how we can mobilize them as a part of our overall cybersecurity defense mechanism, it causes you to rethink whether or not you’re serving your populous correctly.”
Machine learning enables Human Layer Security TF: “What I liked about Tessian is that it gave us an opportunity to use the ML in the background to try and develop context about whether or not something that someone was doing was either atypical or perhaps just part of a bad process. Either way, we can get a sense of whether or not what they’re doing is causing us risk. It doesn’t require us to be completely prescriptive about what we’re looking for, but it allows us to learn with the technology – and with the people – what normal patterns of behavior look like and, therefore, intervene when it matters and not have to react every time an alarm goes off. “You have all this amazing context of what people are doing on email, which is where people spend most of their time and where most of the risk comes for most organizations. How can we turn this into more than just making sure someone doesn’t fat finger an email address or send sensitive files where they’re not supposed to go? Can we take the context that we’re gaining through how people are using email and create more of those moments in time to connect with them?” Tessian fits into a larger security framework TF: “We have a whole bunch of other mechanisms to protect against traditional insider threats – the people who are really acting against our best interest – but that instance is infrequent and high impact. The person who makes the mistake is high frequency, medium-to high-impact. We were getting hammered on that sort of stuff, which is why we came to Tessian.”
“When used correctly and in a finite environment or a finite data set, DLP solutions are very effective at keeping that data where it’s supposed to be and understanding movement in that ecosystem. When you try to deploy that broadly though…you start to run into the inability of the DLP system to understand where that data is supposed to be. Is this person supposed to have it based on their role and their function? It’s not a smart technology like that. You end up trying to write these very complex rules that are hard to manage.” The future of Human Layer Security TF: “Can we start to mesh together what we know about the technology and the machines with real human behavior? It’ll not only help us find those bad guys in our environments who we know are there, but also to get out in front of people’s behavior rather than reacting to it after it happens. That’s the holy grail of what this could become. To get – if not predictive – at least start leading us toward where we think risk exists and allowing us an opportunity to intervene before things happen.” Want to learn more about how Tessian helps Arm catch and stop accidental data loss with Tessian Guardian and prevent spear phishing attacks with Tessian Defender? Read the case study here.
Customer Stories
Ensuring Data Security under GDPR
02 December 2019
Coastal Housing Group is a not-for-profit social housing provider specializing in community residential properties. The business predominantly operates in South Wales, United Kingdom. In addition to residential properties, Coastal Housing has a robust commercial portfolio that focuses on mixed-use town center regeneration projects. Coastal Housing is protecting 250 employees with Tessian Defender and Tessian Guardian.
Protecting a bustling business Coastal Housing has provided housing opportunities to communities across South Wales since 2008. Mark Elias is Coastal Housing’s IT Infrastructure Manager. He understands how important data security is in the housing sector.  Coastal Housing handles and processes a considerable amount of sensitive information and utilizes multiple, complementary technologies to help keep this information protected. While the organization goes to great lengths to provide staff with the reassurance that they are conscientious about security, the IT team recognized that they could do more. With a growing mobile workforce and data regularly exiting the organization’s directly controlled network, the IT team wanted to see how machine learning could fortify their security stack. Tessian’s offering was exactly what Coastal Housing was looking for.
Staying vigilant under GDPR Tessian integrated seamlessly into Coastal Housing’s layered infrastructure. Tessian was up and running in a short period of time and was very easy for the IT team to understand. Having implemented Tessian Guardian, Coastal Housing can now prevent accidental data loss from misdirected emails, mitigating the impact of human error and helping IT teams control an unwieldy problem. Coastal Housing’s IT team deployed Tessian and educated employees about how the product works quietly in the background. With a low false positive rate, Coastal Housing’s employees liked the fact that when a warning did appear, it provided context on what had happened. Guardian accurately flags mistakes without disrupting their day-to-day workflow. Coastal Housing employees now feel assured that they won’t accidentally send sensitive information to the wrong destinations. In addition to the problem of accidental data loss, Coastal Housing’s IT team are acutely aware of how sophisticated spear phishing attacks are becoming. While employees are being as vigilant as they can be, it’s unrealistic to assume they will be able to spot a threat 100% of the time. Armed with Tessian Defender, Coastal Housing has secured their system from inbound spear phishing threats, protecting the organization from data being pilfered and systems being compromised.
Maintaining security while growing Coastal Housing understands that for security to be effective it cannot be static. As threats evolve, so must the technology designed to protect against them. Being a bustling business, Coastal Housing will continue to adapt and to respond to the ever-changing landscape. The organization will continue to focus on investing in platforms that are capable of doing the same.
Learn more about how Tessian prevents human error on email Tessian is building the world’s first Human Layer Security platform to automatically secure all human-digital interactions within the enterprise. Today, our filters use stateful machine learning to protect people using email and to prevent threats like spear phishing, accidental data loss, data exfiltration and other non-compliant email activity. To book a demo and learn more about how we can help your organization, click here.
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