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Automatically stop data breaches and security threats caused by employees on email. Powered by machine learning, Tessian detects anomalies in real-time, integrating seamlessly with your email environment within minutes and starting protection in a day. Provides you with unparalleled visibility into human security risks to remediate threats and ensure compliance.

State of Email Security 2022: Every Company’s Riskiest Channel |  Read the Full Report →

Email DLP, Integrated Cloud Email Security, ATO/BEC
A Year in Review: 2021 Product Updates
by Harry Wetherald Thursday, December 16th, 2021
Looking back at the last 12 months, Tessian’s Human Layer Security platform has scanned nearly 5 billion emails, identified over half a million malicious emails, stopped close to 30,000 account takeover attempts, and prevented over 100,000 data breaches due to a misdirected email…   At the same time, we rolled out a number of important product updates to help keep our customers safe. Here are the most important product updates to Tessian’s Human Layer Security platform from 2021.   We built world’s first Intelligent Data Loss Prevention Engine   We believe that the next generation of Data Loss Prevention is fundamentally about shifting away from entirely rule-based techniques towards a dynamic, behavioral approach. That’s why we built Guardian and Enforcer, to automatically prevent both accidental data loss and sensitive data exfiltration to unauthorized accounts.    But we have also seen that, when combined with dynamic behavioral analysis, custom DLP policies, play an important role in an organization’s data security strategy.   With the launch of Tessian Architect in October 2021, enterprises can now deploy powerful, intelligent DLP policies. Architect is a perfect complement to Tessian Guardian and Enforcer and provides the market’s best-in-class Email DLP platform:   Architect was built together with leading security teams – it’s intuitive, quick-to-learn and comes with a library of prebuilt policies Architect has built-in machine learning capabilities and features a powerful logic engine to address even the most complex DLP use cases Architect is designed to educate users about data security practices in-the-moment and guide people towards better behavior Want to learn more about Tessian Architect? Read more about it here.
We now protect customers from compromised external counterparties   This year, we saw a record number of bad actors compromising email accounts of trusted external senders (suppliers, customers, and other third-parties) to breach a target company. These attacks are canned external Account Takeovers (ATO), and they’re one of the main pathways to Business Email Compromise (BEC).   Because these malicious emails don’t just appear to have come from a trusted vendor or supplier’s legitimate email address, but actually do come from it, external ATOs are incredibly hard to spot, meaning organizations are exceptionally vulnerable to them.    Tessian Defender now automatically detects and stops external Account Takeover attacks.    By using machine learning to understand a sender’s normal email sending patterns (like where they usually send from, what they talk about, what services they use, and more), it can identify suspicious deviations from the norm and detect malicious emails.    When this happens, Defender can either block these attacks, or show educational alerts to end-users, helping them identify and self-triage attacks.   Learn more about External Account Takeover protection here.
We now stop more threats, with better accuracy, with less admin overhead   In-the-moment warnings are one of the features that set Tessian apart from the competition. When Tessian Defender detects a potentially malicious email, it warns users with a pop-up, explaining exactly why the email was flagged.   But, we know that sometimes, it’s better to automatically block phishing emails.   Tessian Defender now automatically blocks attacks, before they reach a user’s mailbox. This gives security teams an  additional layer of email security, preventing end-users from receiving emails that are highly likely to be phishing attacks.    Defender can also adapt the response it takes to remediate a threat. If our machine learning is close to certain an email is malicious, it can quarantine it. Otherwise, it can deliver it to the end-user with an educational warning. This adaptive approach is so powerful because it strikes a balance between disrupting end-users and protecting them.   Finally, this year, Tessian Defender’s detection algorithm made some big strides. In particular, improvements in our risk confidence model allowed us to reduce false positives by significantly providing a better experience to end-users and security teams.
We now stop employees from accidentally sending the wrong attachment   Accidental data loss is the number one security incident reported to the Information Commissioner’s Office, and sending an incorrect attachment is part of that problem. In fact, 1 in 5 external emails contain an attachment, and research shows nearly half (48%) of employees have attached the wrong file to an email.    42% of documents sent in error contained company research and data 39% contained security information like passwords and passcodes 38% contained financial information and client information.  36% of mistakenly attached documents contained employee data   Thanks to an upgrade to Tessian Guardian, organizations can now prevent employees from accidentally sending the wrong attachment in an email.    The upgrade uses historical learning, deep content inspection, natural language processing (NPL), and heuristics to detect counterparty anomalies, name anomalies, context anomalies, and file type anomalies to understand whether an employee is attaching the correct file or not. If a misattached file is detected, the sender is immediately alerted to the error before the email is sent. This is completely automated, requiring no overhead from IT teams.   Best of all, the warnings are helpful, and flag rates are extremely low. This means employees can do their jobs without security getting in the way.   Learn more about misattached file protection here.
We can now quantify and measure human layer risk   Comprehensive visibility into employee risk is one of the biggest challenges security leaders face. With the Tessian Human Layer Risk Hub, our customers can now deeply understand their organization’s security posture, with granular visibility into employee risk, and insights into their risk levels and drivers.   How does it work? Tessian creates risk profiles for each employee, modelled from a range of signals like email usage patterns, indirect risk indicators, and employee security decisions (both historic and in real-time). Because of this unique data modelling, Tessian can gauge employees’ risk level, including whether or not they’re careful, careless, frequently attacked, and more.   This offers organizations protection, training, and risk analytics all in one platform, providing a clear picture of risk and the tools needed to reduce it.   Learn more about the Human Layer Risk Hub here.
We now integrate with KnowBe4, Sumo Logic, Okta, and more… Tessian is even more powerful when integrated with other security solutions that help address the risk posed by employees. That’s why, in the last 12 months, we’ve announced exciting integrations with Okta, Sumo Logic, and KnowBe4, each with their own unique benefits for joint customers. With Sumo Logic + Tessian, security and risk team can understand their risk through out-of-the-box monitoring and analytics capabilities.
With Okta + Tessian, security and risk management teams geet granular visibility into their organization’s riskiest and most at-risk employees and consequently enable them to deploy policies that can help protect particular groups of users from threats like advanced spear phishing and account compromise and prevent accidental data leaks.
And with KnowBe4 + Tessian, security and risk management teams get more visibility into phishing risk than ever before.
Want to help us solve more challenges across use cases? Come build with us.
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Customer Stories, Email DLP, Integrated Cloud Email Security
16 Ways to Get Buy-In For Cybersecurity Solutions
by Maddie Rosenthal Friday, December 3rd, 2021
As a security or IT leader, researching and vetting security solutions is step one. What’s step two, then? Convincing key stakeholders like the CEO, CFO, and the board that the product needs to be implemented, that it needs to be implemented now, and that it’s worth the cost.   This is easier said than done, but security is business-critical.   So, how do you communicate risk and make a compelling case to (eventually) get buy-in from executives?   We talked to security leaders from some of the world’s most trusted and innovative organizations to find out what they do to get buy-in from CxOs. Here’s a summary of their tips.   You can download this infographic with a quick summary of all of the below tips. This is perfect for sharing with peers or colleagues. Or, download this eBook.   1. Familiarize yourself with overall business objectives   While cybersecurity has historically been a siloed department, today, it’s an absolutely essential function that supports and enables the overall business. Think about the consequences of a data breach beyond lost data. Organizations experience higher rates of customer churn, reputations are damaged, and, with regulatory fines and the cost of investigation and remediation, there can be significant revenue loss.   The key, then, is to attach cybersecurity initiatives to key business objectives. The security leaders we interviewed recommended starting by reviewing annual reports and strategic roadmaps. Then, build your business case.   If customer retention and growth are KPIs for the year, insist that cybersecurity builds customer trust and is a competitive differentiator. If the organization is looking for higher profits, make it clear how much a breach would impact the company’s bottom line. (According to IBM’s latest Cost of a Data Breach, the average cost of a data breach is $4.24 million.)
2. Create specific “what-if” scenarios   A lot of security solutions are bought reactively (after an incident occurs), but security leaders need to take a proactive approach. The problem is, it’s more challenging for CxOs and the board to see the value of a solution when they haven’t yet experienced any consequences without it.    As the saying goes, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it”.    That’s why security leaders have to preempt push-back to proactive pitches by outlining what the consequences would be if a solution isn’t implemented so that stakeholders can understand both probability and impact.   For example, if you’re trying to get buy-in for an outbound email security solution, focus on the “what-ifs” associated with sending misdirected emails  which – by the way- are sent 800 times a year in organizations with 1,000 employees. Ask executives to imagine a situation in which their biggest clients’ most sensitive data lands in the wrong inbox.  What would happen?    Make sure you identify clear, probable consequences. That way, the situation seems possible (if not likely) instead of being an exaggerated “worst-case scenario”.    3. Work closely with the security vendor   You know your business. Security vendors know their product. If you combine each of your expertise – and really lean on each other – you’ll have a much better chance of making a compelling case for a particular solution.   Ask the vendor for specific resources (if they don’t exist, ask them to create them!), ask for product training, ask if you can speak with an existing customer. Whatever you need to get buy-in, ask for it. Rest assured, they’ll be happy to help.    4. Collaborate and align with other departments   It takes a village and cybersecurity is a “people problem”.  That means you should reach out to colleagues in different departments for advice and other input. Talk to the folks from Risk and Compliance, Legal, HR, Operations, and Finance early on.    Get their opinion on the product’s value. Find out how it might be able to help them with their goals and initiatives. In doing so, you might even be able to pool money from other budgets. Win-win!
5. Consider how much the executive(s) really know about security   To communicate effectively, you have to speak the same language. And, we don’t just mean English versus French. We mean really getting on the same level as whomever you’re in conversation with.   But, to do that, you have to first know how much your audience actually knows about the topic you’re discussing.   For example, if you look into your CEO’s background and find out that he or she studied computer science, you’ll be able to get away with some technical jargon. But, if their background is limited to business studies, you’ll want to keep it simple. Avoid security-specific acronyms and – whatever you do – don’t bury the point underneath complex explanations of processes.    In short: Don’t succumb to the Curse of Knowledge.
6. Use analogies to put costs into perspective   One of the best ways to avoid the Curse of Knowledge and give abstract ideas a bit more context is to use analogies. It could be the ROI of a product or the potential cost of a breach. Either way, analogies can make big, somewhat meaningless numbers more tangible and impactful.   For example, imagine you’re trying to convince your CFO that the cost of a solution is worth it. But, the 6-digit, one-time cost is a hard sell. What do you do? Break the overall cost down by the product’s lifespan. Then, divide that number by the number of employees it will protect during that same period.   Suddenly, the cost will seem more manageable and worth the investment.   7. Invite key stakeholders to events or webinars   Before you even start pitching a particular solution, warm-up executives with educational webinars or events that aren’t product-specific. This will give CxOs a chance to better understand the problem, how it might apply to them, and how other people/organizations are finding solutions.   Bear in mind: most vendors will have at least 1 (generally 2+) webinars or events during the standard sales cycle.   8. Prepare concise and personalized briefing materials   Individual stakeholders will be more likely to consider a particular solution if the problem it solves is directly relevant to them. How? Combine tips #1, #2, #3, and #5.   After taking some time to understand the business’ overall objectives, take a closer look at individual peoples’ roles and responsibilities in meeting those objectives. Then, dig a bit deeper into how much they know about cybersecurity.   Imagine you’re meeting with a COO with some technical experience whose focus is on maintaining relationships with customers. His or her briefing documents should contain minimal technical jargon and should focus on how a data breach affects customer churn.   The bottom line: make it about them.   9. Share these documents in advance of any formal meetings   While this may seem obvious, the security leaders we spoke to made it clear that this is an essential step in getting buy-in. No one wants to feel caught off guard, unprepared, or rushed.   To avoid all of the above, make sure you share any documents relevant to the solution well in advance of any formal meetings.   But, don’t just dump the documents on their desk or in their inbox. Outline exactly what each document is, why it’s relevant to the meeting, and what the key takeaways are. You want to do whatever you can to help them absorb the information, so make sure you make yourself available after sharing the documents and before the meeting, just in case they have any questions or need additional information.   10. Build a strong security culture   Before we dive into why building a strong security culture can help you get buy-in, we want to make it clear that this isn’t something that can happen overnight. This is a long-term goal that requires the help of the entire organization. Yes, everyone.   So, how do you build a strong security culture? Start by ensuring that security and IT teams are committed to helping – not blaming – employees. There has to be a certain level of mutual trust and respect.   Beyond that, employees have to accept responsibility for the overall security of the organization. They have to understand that their actions – whether it’s clicking on a phishing email or using a weak password – have consequences.   If they do accept this responsibility, and if they genuinely care about following policies and procedures and helping secure data and networks, high-level executives will care, too. They’ll therefore be more likely to sign-off on solutions.   11. Keep an eye on security trends outside of your industry S ome industries – specifically Healthcare, Financial Services, and Legal – are bound to compliance standards that formalize the need for effective security solutions. That means that, compared to other industries like Retail or Manufacturing, they’ll be required to have more robust strategies in place. What they’re doing now, the rest of us will be doing in 12 months.   Keep this in mind.   If you notice that organizations operating in the most highly regulated industries are all taking data loss prevention (DLP) seriously, you’ll be able to make a strong case that this is something that should be on your radar, too.   12. Approach non-executive stakeholders early on   While – yes – getting buy-in from CxOs and the board is important, security leaders also need to get buy-in from non-executive stakeholders working in IT, infrastructure, etc.   After all, those are the people who will actually be responsible for deploying the solution and maintaining it.By approaching them early on (and assuming they’re interested in the solution, too) you’ll be able to paint a clear picture of the process after the solution has been signed off on.   How long will it take? Who’s involved? Will employees’ workflow be disrupted? These are all important questions to answer.   13. Match like-for-like people from both sides   If you’re scheduling a meeting with executives from your side and key people from the vendor’s side, make sure you’re bringing in people that “match” in terms of function and seniority level.   For example, if you work at a start-up and the founder of your company wants to be involved in the buying process, ask the vendor’s founders to join, too. Likewise, if the Head of Infrastructure is joining from your side, ask someone in a similar function to join from the other side. Why? Like-for-like people will be best placed to answer one another’s questions.   And, with that in mind…. 14. Preempt questions and prepare answers   No one likes to be put on the spot. To avoid being asked a question that you don’t know the answer to, spend a good amount of time considering all the questions different stakeholders may ask and drafting well-thought-out answers. (Better yet, fit the answers into briefing documents or the presentation itself!)   Remember, people are generally concerned with how a problem/solution affects them directly. That means the CEO will have different questions than the CFO, who will have different questions than the Head of IT.   15. Get specific customer references from the vendor   We mentioned in tip #3 that you should lean on the vendor, especially when it comes to specific resources and customer references. And, we mentioned in tip #11 that you should match like-for-like people in meetings.   It should make sense, then, that specific customer references will be more powerful than generic ones. For example, if you’re the CISO at a 4,000-person tech firm in North America, and you’re trying to convince you’re CTO that you need to implement a new solution, you should share a case study (or customer reference) from the vendor that outlines how their product has helped an organization in the same industry, that’s the same size, and in the same region. Ideally, it will also feature quotes from the CTO.   Why? Professionals trust and rely on their peers when making difficult decisions. 16. Be conscious (and considerate of) peoples’ time   Decisions about security solutions can involve a lot of different people. That means you’ll have to balance several conflicting schedules and fight for time. Your best bet? Book meetings with all relevant people at once and get the vendor involved at the same time. Ahead of the meeting, share an agenda along with any relevant documents (see tip #8).
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Email DLP
The Ultimate Guide to Data Loss Prevention
by Andrew Webb Wednesday, November 24th, 2021
What is DLP? Decades of digital technology transformation have given employees amazing powers. But with that power also comes the ability to send millions of dollars in just a few clicks, or share an entire customer database in a single emailed file. Today, your people are often the gatekeepers to your company’s most sensitive systems IP and data. Enter data loss prevention (DLP).  Your DLP tools and strategy are critical to the safe running of your business. At its core, DLP aims to minimize the risk of confidential or business-critical data leaving an organization.
How much business-critical data do you handle?   Different people within your organization handle a variety of data types. Sales for example might have customer names and emails, whereas Finance would have staff payroll details. The product and dev team would probably have sensitive IP information, and roles like sales engineers and tech ops might handle your customers’ data. Regardless of the role though, it’s all information, it’s all valuable to you (and bad actors), and it can all be lost.    Take a moment to ask yourself if your business as a whole routinely handles any of the following: company IP credit card details medical records insurance details legal case notes sensitive financial data personally identifiable information (PII).  Chances are, if your business has customers or clients, you’re handling business-critical sensitive data.    Why email is your greatest DLP threat    Now let’s consider how data gets ‘lost’ in the first place… There are several ways, but nearly all of them come down to one thing: people make mistakes, either accidentally or on purpose.
Successful businesses are, by their very nature, porous. Information flows in and out at a near endless rate from staff, customers, prospects, suppliers, trade bodies, local authorities, and government. While recent tools like Slack and Teams have eaten email’s dominance of internal communication, the main method for external communication remains email, and it is the primary way that most firms conduct business today. In fact, an Adobe Email Usage Study found that employees routinely spend 40% of their work time reading, writing and sending emails.   Let’s stop pretending there are different jobs. There’s only one job and it’s emails. — Kate Helen Downey (@katehelendowney) July 13, 2021   How big is your problem? How big is your firm?   According to data from Tessian’s own platform, employees send nearly 400 emails a month. If your organization has 1000 employees, that’s 400,000 emails, or around 13,000 a day. And if you’re routinely handling and emailing sensitive data, each of those is a data breach waiting to happen..   We don’t want to fearmonger (because Fear, Uncertainty, and Doubt (FUD) doesn’t fudging work…) but it’s clear email remains your number one threat vector.    The big challenge is that people make around 35,000 decisions every single day; that’s 35,000 chances to make a mistake..In the context of email, that means not always identifying phishing emails correctly, and sometimes attaching the wrong file.   This is why, in 2021, an overwhelming 85% of data breaches involved human error.  
!function(e,t,s,i){var n="InfogramEmbeds",o=e.getElementsByTagName("script"),d=o[0],r=/^http:/.test(e.location)?"http:":"https:";if(/^\/{2}/.test(i)&&(i=r+i),window[n]&&window[n].initialized)window[n].process&&window[n].process();else if(!e.getElementById(s)){var a=e.createElement("script");a.async=1,a.id=s,a.src=i,d.parentNode.insertBefore(a,d)}}(document,0,"infogram-async","//e.infogram.com/js/dist/embed-loader-min.js"); Find more statistics at Statista  
Insider threats (and how to spot and stop them)   You can secure your perimeter against external attack, but what about the ones that come from ‘inside the house’? The fact is, people break the rules way more often than IT leaders think, both intentionally and accidentally.  
Insider threats are an organization’s biggest hidden security problem.   With attention directed externally, internal issues are typically under-resourced and under-addressed. What’s more, unlike bad actors or state sponsored hackers, your staff have legitimate access to systems and data. That means they’re in an ideal position to exfiltrate data. You can see why for some companies, it’s a difficult conversation to have.
!function(e,t,s,i){var n="InfogramEmbeds",o=e.getElementsByTagName("script"),d=o[0],r=/^http:/.test(e.location)?"http:":"https:";if(/^\/{2}/.test(i)&&(i=r+i),window[n]&&window[n].initialized)window[n].process&&window[n].process();else if(!e.getElementById(s)){var a=e.createElement("script");a.async=1,a.id=s,a.src=i,d.parentNode.insertBefore(a,d)}}(document,0,"infogram-async","//e.infogram.com/js/dist/embed-loader-min.js"); Yet our State of Data Loss Prevention report found that 45% of all employees download, save, send, or otherwise exfiltrate work related documents before leaving or after being dismissed from a job. So what can be done? Well firstly, you need to recognize what data exfiltration looks like. There are two distinct types of insider threats, malicious (those that set out to deliberately cause harm) and negligent (those that cause harm by accident).   Spotting malicious insider threats   So how do you recognize if you have malicious or negligent staff within your organization? Well, there are several telltale signs. Malicious actors, for example, might display declining performance or other signs of dissatisfaction. They might start logging in at unusual hours, have multiple failed logins, or other abnormal login activity.
Spotting negligent insider threats   Negligent staff meanwhile might repeatedly fall for phishing attacks, or fail to comply with basic security policies such as consistently misdirecting emails, or miss attaching files. There could be several reasons for this, from burnout, to boredom.    Remember also, that staff often have genuine reasons to send documents externally. Sending things like plane tickets, restaurant reservations, pay slips, and other digital ‘pocket litter’ home isn’t going to cripple your business – but it will generate false positives in your SEG.
Stopping Insider Threats    What’s critical in stopping these events is real time oversight of when they happen. In the case of malicious intent, you need to know instantly when someone has attempted an exfiltration to prevent data loss.With negligent staff, on the other hand, it can help to have a build up of data over time to inform your actions.    Exfiltration types and methods What is Data Exfiltration? Tips for Preventing Data Exfiltration Webinar: How to Reduce Data data Exfiltration by 84% Within 30 Days How to Keep Your Data Safe in The Great Resignation   The silver lining to this cloud is it isn’t all on you – it’s as much a people issue as a technology issue. As your organization’s cybersecurity leader, you need to work with your people team and other senior leaders on addressing this. Why? Because the costs of an insider threat breach are getting bigger.
The repercussions of a breach   Insider or external, a data breach can create significant fallout for your organization. First, there’s the financial cost. This isn’t a one-off fee – it can come in several forms. There’s the loss of revenue in the turbulence as customers churn or take their business elsewhere. Then, depending on your sector, there’s the increasing regulatory fines and legal actions. In the EU, GDPR has meant these costs have skyrocketed. Fines are particularly large in sectors like financial services and healthcare.    There’s also the time and resources you’ll spend dealing with a breach, not only the loss incurred by your own staff who have to now deal with this, but any external expertise you have to bring in to help repair or restore systems. But like an end-of-level boss in a video game, by far the biggest and most expensive repercussion is the reputational damage your organization suffers – this can last years.    When we asked security leaders what the biggest consequence of a breach is, here’s what they replied. See more at Why DLP Has Failed and What the Future Looks Like. !function(e,t,s,i){var n="InfogramEmbeds",o=e.getElementsByTagName("script"),d=o[0],r=/^http:/.test(e.location)?"http:":"https:";if(/^\/{2}/.test(i)&&(i=r+i),window[n]&&window[n].initialized)window[n].process&&window[n].process();else if(!e.getElementById(s)){var a=e.createElement("script");a.async=1,a.id=s,a.src=i,d.parentNode.insertBefore(a,d)}}(document,0,"infogram-async","//e.infogram.com/js/dist/embed-loader-min.js");   Every year, IBM publishes their Cost of a Data Breach report. You can get key findings from the 2021 version, as well as the report itself below, but the key findings regarding breach costs are:   Data breach costs rose from $3.86 million to $4.24 million, the highest average total cost in the history of this report  There was a 10% increase in the average total cost of a breach between 2020 and 2021. This was the largest single year cost increase in the last seven years. The average cost of a breach at organizations with 81-100% of employees working remotely was $5.54 million
The problems with legacy DLP   Early DLP solutions from the ‘00s were designed to filter bulk spam. Then Internet Service Providers, Secure Email Gateways, and antivirus software added pattern and keyword recognition to identify potentially threatening emails. And today’s DLP solutions added rules and a host of other technical measures… but they’re just not up to the job anymore.
Watch now: DLP Has Failed The Enterprise. What Now?
Blocking domains: Particular domains, often ‘freemail’, are blocked. But there are plenty of legitimate reasons to send and receive emails from people with ‘freemail’ domains. Many small businesses and freelancers use Gmail, for example.    Blacklisting: Security teams create a list of non-authorized email addresses and simply block all emails sent or received. This requires constant updating and is very time/resource intensive. It’s also reactive; you only know an address is bad after they’ve been known to be associated with unauthorized communications.   Keywords: This method uses words and phrases to alert administrators of suspicious email activity. For example, IT and security teams can create rules to identify keywords like “social security numbers” or “bank account details”. But anyone trying to exfiltrate data can circumvent keyword tracking tools by sending the email and the attached data in an encrypted form.   Tagging Data: After classifying data, an organization may attempt to tag sensitive data, allowing administrators to track it as it moves within and outside of a network. The drawback here is that, again, this is time and resource intensive and relies on employees accurately identifying and tagging all sensitive data. Miss a tag, and data is misclassified or simply overlooked.   The challenge with all of the above is that they are based on rules. But human behavior can’t be predicted or controlled by rules, and human’s often subvert, side step, or break the rules, even when they know they shouldn’t.
How to bend not break the rules   -51% of staff say security tools and software impede their productivity at work -54% of staff say that if security software or policies make it difficult or prevent them from doing their job, they’ll find a workaround Read: Tessian’s State of Data Loss Protection Report But workarounds aren’t the only problem with rules…   Binary, rule-based DLP solutions offer blunt protection and limited visibility into complex human behavior and data movement. This leaves security leaders in the dark, trawling through logs of flagged and self-reported incidents after they’ve occurred.    There’s also the problem of false positives, and genuine, important emails are often buried in quarantine along with potentially harmful ones.    And with most risks to data security actually coming from within an organization, security teams have to classify and monitor data across hundreds – even thousands – of different entry and exit points of a corporate network.    The result is that legacy DLP has gotten way more expensive, complicated, and requires more and more administration and fire-fighting from InfoSec teams. 
Is it time to re-think your DLP strategy?   It’s clear that traditional DLP can’t prevent all data loss.   This is where Tessian comes in. Tessian Cloud Email Security intelligently prevents advanced email threats and protects against data loss, to strengthen email security and build smarter security cultures in modern enterprises. it automatically detects accidental data loss, malicious exfiltration, and phishing attacks in real-time, before sensitive data leaves your environment. Crucially, it doesn’t stop your employees from doing what they do best – their actual jobs, yet still provides you with clear visibility of threats.   Indeed, a recent Forrester Consulting report found that the security and risk leaders who have adopted Human Layer Security feel more prepared to face security and data loss incidents and to face a hybrid workforce than those who haven’t.   They believe their email security posture is extremely effective at alerting the organization to potential attacks/threats from users’ risky behaviors or poor security decisions. Meanwhile, those who don’t take a Human Layer approach feel less control over business disruptions.”
We’re seeing more and more industry pioneers explore this option, layering a tool like Tessian on top of Microsoft 356’s native tools. We take a deep dive into this new approach in our recent webinar ‘DLP Blindspots: Next Gen DLP’.
Ultimately, you know what stage of the journey your organization is on. But if you need further resources to comprehensively compare Tessian’s Human Layer Security alongside legacy DLP, Microsoft 365 DLP capabilities, legacy file encryption, and network and Perimeter Security, we’ve covered all that in forensic detail in this white paper.   In it, you’ll learn the pros and cons of different email security solutions, and how they stack up against Human Layer Security. This will help you evaluate a solution that works for you, and that best protects sensitive data in your organization.   Read now: Human Layer Security vs. Legacy Email Security Solutions white paper
DLP and Microsoft 365   So what does a smart, fit-for-the-21century DLP solution look like? Well, many organizations are now retiring their SEGs in favor of a Microsoft 365 solution, with Tessian layered on top as an EDR.    Over a million businesses worldwide use Microsoft 365, with 731,000 companies in the United States alone. Of course, because it’s the most popular solution on the planet, it also makes it a target for bad actors.    Although Microsoft 365 provides foundational rule-based data loss prevention (DLP) and data classification to address compliance requirements, it falls short when protecting against data loss caused by people.    Tessian complements Microsoft 365 with a behavioral analytics layer and offers enhanced data protection by closing critical DLP use case gaps such as inadvertent or accidental data loss, sensitive data exfiltration to unauthorized or personal accounts, and insider risks.
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How Tessian helps secure your Human Layer   We’ve come to the point where you’re considering how best to stop DLP in your organization. From working with our customers over the years, we’ve found that it’s best to think the following three ways    Research You’ve already started the research phase – simply be reading this page. Continue that process by auditing your estate, consulting team members, and identifying solutions. This is also the time to consult your network, join those webinars and read those whitepapers.    Rethink Any change in your DLP strategy needs to be able to face not only current threats, but future developments in those threats and their impact too. Maybe now really is the time to upgrade that legacy SEG with Microsoft 365 and Tessian. Perhaps you want to stay with a rule based DLP but are looking for something smarter? In which case Tessian Architect might be the right solution.    Part of the re-thinking phase is also re-training. With the average human makes 35,000 decisions every single day, we know that a morning of cybersecurity training every six months isn’t as effective as ‘in the moment’ training provided by Tessian. So now’s the time to rethink your training and awareness processes too.   Resource  This is where the rubber hits the road, you can’t do anything of the above without the right resources – time, people and budget – but you’re not going to get those without first showing that you’ve done the previous two phases to arrive at a road map to securing your Human Layer. Introducing Tessian Architect: The Industry’s Only Intelligent Data Loss Prevention Policy Engine
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Email DLP
Why Email Encryption Isn’t Enough: The Need for Intelligent Email Security
by Merlin Kafka Tuesday, November 16th, 2021
Encryption of data, whether in transit or at rest, is seen as a cornerstone of data loss prevention best practice. But when it comes to the encryption of data sent via email, the efficacy of legacy approaches to email encryption are increasingly being called into question. This is largely due to the rigid and binary nature of legacy email encryption solutions.    Increasingly, email security solutions that rely on encryption to prevent data loss are unable to meet the demands for frictionless and time-sensitive communication. An even greater challenge, however, is the declining effectiveness of this approach to preventing data loss, especially in the face of increasingly sophisticated cyber adversaries and the growing prominence of insider threats.    The fundamental challenge of legacy email encryption solutions hinges on its inability to address the root cause of email related breaches and data loss: human error.   In this article, we’ll explore the pros and cons of encryption, and more effective alternatives.   What is encryption?   Encryption is a method of data protection that encodes data so that it can’t be accessed by unauthorized parties. File encryption solutions, in particular, often use AES-256 bit encryption to secure unstructured data, usually with a long list of policies and access rights that the end user must choose before sending an attachment through email.   This has a negative impact on real-time communication and collaboration in organizations and their legitimate business partners.   Is encryption useful in specific cases?   The short answer? Yes.    When the first order of business is simply to secure a particular asset, like an email or the attachment in that email, encryption can provide immediate protection of that sensitive information. Depending on the solution, it can work at rest or in-transit. It’s also a long-standing technology that’s widely used, especially when fulfilling particular compliance mandates. Finally, it tends to be inexpensive compared to other solutions, simply because it’s providing a very targeted and specific technology, as opposed to a more comprehensive data loss prevention solution.   However, we’ve learned from our customers and based on where the market is headed in terms of preventing sensitive data exfiltration that more and more, organizations are actually shifting away from encryption for a variety of reasons (more on this below).   Industry experts also see the severe limitations of encryption in email security.    As Gartner® states in the 2021 Email Security Market Guide, “Although email encryption has been available for many years, the workflow is often very poor, meaning open rates of encrypted emails are historically low. Authenticating the recipient has always been the challenge, requiring users to create new accounts on messaging portals and leading to very poor open rates. With the widespread adoption of cloud email, authenticating users that are on the same platform (e.g. Microsoft 365) has simplified the process, but as soon as recipients are on different platforms, the issue remains.   A number of vendors focused on email data protection are looking to address this with simplified workflows and second-factor authentication. Secure messaging portals that store sensitive information separate from email is one solution, but that raises questions over data residency and where the keys are stored.”
Looking at Encryption? Consider these issues first…   Encryption can give a false sense of security   Back in 2011, Lockhead Martin’s servers were hacked. It was reported extensively in the press and was characterized as “significant and tenacious”. The press reported that hackers gained access using stolen SecurID tokens from the security company, RSA.    In other words, hackers simply gained access to the private keys so they could access Lockheed Martin’s servers. Encryption is only as strong as the solution used to secure the credentials to those encrypted assets.   Encryption does NOT solve for accidental data loss   Encryption itself doesn’t prevent sharing emails to wrong parties or sending wrong attachments. It also doesn’t solve the root cause of many data loss incidents — sending information to unauthorized or unintended recipients. The recipients of encrypted emails, including incorrect recipients, are free to decrypt encrypted emails by requesting a one time password to view the information. Encryption requires end users to set policies and access rights which can be error prone and disruptive   File encryption requires that the end user define the policies and access rights to every file they attach to their emails. This is often a huge list of options, including view only, block printing, block sending, and time bombs, and many other policies.Naturally, users find this process cumbersome as it hinders their ability to collaborate and communicate through email effectively.   Encryption doesn’t work for Insider Threats Just as we saw in the Lockheed Martin example, the viability of encryption is often dependent on the security of the credentials used to access the encrypted assets. This is exactly what Edward Snowden did:He simply compromised the credentials of the admins who had access to the encrypted assets.    The bottom line   While security leaders have to consider the loop holes above, perhaps the most important aspect to consider with legacy encryption is its inability to engage the end user in any meaningful way. In other words, the context of the data and attachments in emails is never thoroughly examined, so it’s not addressing the root cause of data loss.    Instead, cumbersome solutions like encryption are used, which don’t account for unknown anomalies, or consider the friction and latency it produces when implemented. To prevent today’s email security incidents, your security controls must address the root cause of data loss — human behavior. This is why Gartner recommends adopting cloud native email security solutions that address data loss, by leveraging context-aware machine learning (ML) — able to detect threats and anomalies, while at the same time educating the end-user on email security best practice.   Tessian was included in the report as a Representative vendor. Here’s why:   Threat prevention: Tessian protects against both known and unknown email attacks, including business email compromise, account takeover, spear phishing, and all impersonation attacks that bypass SEGs, M365, and G Suite Education and awareness: With Tessian’s in-the-moment training, organizations can educate and empower users to build continuous email security awareness  Reduced admin overhead: Tessian removes the burden on SOC and admins by automating repetitive tasks such as maintaining triage and review. This eliminates the need for human verification of email threats, reducing FTE requirements. Data-rich dashboards: With Tessian, security teams have clear visibility and the ability to demonstrate clear ROI     Want to learn more about how Tessian compares to legacy solutions? This whitepaper provides an extensive comparison document that covers a variety of legacy security solutions, including encryption, Secure Email Gateways (SEGs), Legacy Data Loss Prevention, Network and Perimeter Security, DMARC, and many others. 
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Email DLP, Integrated Cloud Email Security, ATO/BEC
Tessian Recognized as a Representative Vendor in 2021 Gartner® Market Guide for Email Security
by Ed Bishop Tuesday, November 9th, 2021
Tessian is honored to be recognized as a Representative Vendor for Integrated Cloud Email Security (ICES) in the recently released 2021 Gartner Market Guide for Email Security. According to Gartner the “continued increases in the volume and success of phishing attacks and migration to cloud email require a reevaluation of email security controls and processes. Security and risk management leaders must ensure that their existing solution remains appropriate for the changing landscape.”
The key findings listed in this Market Guide for Email Security    According to this report, “the adoption of cloud email systems continues to grow, forcing security and risk management leaders to evaluate the native capabilities offered by these providers”. The report further states “solutions that integrate directly into cloud email via an API, rather than as a gateway, ease evaluation and deployment and improve detection accuracy, while still taking advantage of the integration of the bulk of phishing protection with the core platform.”    The report also states that “ransomware, impersonation, and account takeover attacks are increasing and causing direct financial loss, as users place too much trust in the identities associated with email inherently vulnerable to deception and social engineering.”    Gartner recommends that the security and risk managers for email security should: “Use email security solutions that include anti-phishing technology for business email compromise (BEC), protection that uses AI to detect communication patterns and conversation-style anomalies, as well as computer vision for inspecting suspect URLs.”  “Consider products that also include context-aware banners to help reinforce security awareness training.” “Invest in user education and implement standard operating procedures for handling financial and sensitive data transactions commonly targeted by impersonation attacks. Remove as many targeted ad hoc processes from email as possible.”   This report highlights trends that we believe Tessian is also seeing.    Historically, companies around the globe were deploying the Tessian platform to augment the shortcomings of their Secure Email Gateways (SEGs). Customers needed a more comprehensive solution that would stop the real nasty stuff like zero-day attacks and ransomware, and that was able to detect and stop the threats that often slip past their SEGs such as business email compromise (BEC), account takeover (ATO), spear phishing, and impersonation attacks. Tessian’s recent Spear Phishing Threat Landscape 2021 Report examined emails from July 2020 – July 2021, and discovered nearly 2,000,000 emails slipped through SEGs. An interesting shift we’ve observed over the past nine months is that we’re seeing more and more customers leveraging the enhancements made by Microsoft along with the Tessian platform to replace their SEG. We expect that trend to accelerate in 2022. Gartner predicts that “by 2023, at least 40% of all organizations will use built-in protection capabilities from cloud email providers rather than a secure email gateway (SEG), up from 27% in 2020.”     Tessian’s approach Tessian is a leading cloud email security platform that intelligently protects organizations against advanced threats and data loss on email, while coaching people about security threats in-the-moment. Using machine learning and behavioral data science, Tessian automatically stops threats that evade legacy Secure Email Gateways, including advanced phishing attacks, business email compromise, accidental data loss and insider threats. Tessian’s intelligent approach not only strengthens email security but also builds smarter security cultures in the modern enterprise. Built as a cloud-native platform, Tessian integrates seamlessly with O365, Google Workspace, and MS Exchange environments within minutes, learns in hours, and starts protecting in a day closing the critical gaps in the email security stack.    
Tessian is honored to be recognized as a Representative Vendor for Integrated Cloud Email Security (ICES) in the recently released 2021 Gartner Market Guide for Email Security. According to Gartner the “continued increases in the volume and success of phishing attacks and migration to cloud email require a reevaluation of email security controls and processes. Security and risk management leaders must ensure that their existing solution remains appropriate for the changing landscape.”
The Tessian differentiators:  Threat prevention: Tessian protects against both known and unknown email attacks, including business email compromise, account takeover, spear-phishing, and all impersonation attacks that bypass SEGs, M365, and G Suite Education and awareness: With Tessian’s in-the-moment training, organizations can educate and empower users to build continuous email security awareness  Reduced admin overhead: Tessian removes the burden on SOC and admins by automating repetitive tasks such as maintaining triage and review. This eliminates the need for human verification of email threats, reducing FTE requirements. Data-rich dashboards: With Tessian, security teams have clear visibility and the ability to demonstrate clear ROI  
Tessian solutions: Tessian Defender is a comprehensive inbound email security solution that automatically prevents a wide range of attacks that bypass Secure Email Gateways (SEGs) while providing in-the-moment training to drive employees toward secure email behavior.  Tessian Guardian automatically detects and prevents accidental data loss from misdirected emails. Tessian Enforcer automatically detects and prevents data exfiltration attempts and ensures compliant email activity. Tessian Architect is a powerful policy engine for real-time email data loss prevention. It features a combination of classic elements of DLP policies that provide custom protection against sensitive data loss. To learn more about how Tessian can help strengthen your email security posture, book a demo now.    
Gartner, “Market Guide For Email Security”, Mark Harris, Peter Firstbrook, Ravisha Chugh, Mario de Boer, October 7, 2021. Gartner Disclaimer: GARTNER is registered trademark and service mark of Gartner, Inc. and/or its affiliates in the U.S. and internationally and is used herein with permission. All rights reserved. Gartner does not endorse any vendor, product or service depicted in its research publications, and does not advise technology users to select only those vendors with the highest ratings or other designation. Gartner research publications consist of the opinions of Gartner’s research organization and should not be construed as statements of fact. Gartner disclaims all warranties, expressed or implied, with respect to this research, including any warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.
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Email DLP
Introducing Tessian Architect: The Industry’s Only Intelligent Data Loss Prevention Policy Engine
by Ed Bishop Monday, October 11th, 2021
Legacy Data Loss Prevention is quickly becoming an antiquated technology that isn’t evolving to meet the needs of enterprise organizations. Most of these solutions rely heavily on rules, create massive overhead for admin teams, and typically require constant manual fine-tuning to manage the myriad of false alerts.  And even with legacy DLP in place, data breaches continue to happen.  Perhaps the most important aspect to consider with legacy data loss prevention, is that static policies are often not as effective as we need them to be. They tend to be severely limited, and often restrict employees far more than what is necessary. These cumbersome solutions are based on known signatures, which don’t account for unknown anomalies, or consider the friction and latency they produce when implemented.  Here at Tessian, we believe that the next generation of Data Loss Prevention is fundamentally about shifting away from a static, rules-based approach, to a dynamic, behavioral approach that can address the specific context of each potential incident.  We have seen first hand how Data Loss Prevention has become too reliant on static rules and places far too much burden on admin to identify, investigate and remediate sensitive data loss. That’s why we built Guardian and Enforcer, to automatically prevent both accidental data loss and sensitive data exfiltration to unauthorized accounts.  However, we have also seen that custom policies, when combined with dynamic behavioral analysis, plays an important role for an organization’s DLP strategy. When policies are used, they should be intelligent where applicable, be easy to configure and manage, and leverage end-user remediation to reduce administrative burden. Now with Tessian Architect, enterprises can now deploy powerful intelligent DLP policies. Architect completes Tessian Guardian and Enforcer and provides the market’s best-in-class Email DLP platform.
Here Are Some of the Top Use Cases Architect Can Address Detect hidden content in Excel spreadsheets to prevent accidental disclosure of sensitive data Use regular expressions to detect specific data types and identify high severity breaches by defining unique match thresholds (e.g. more than 5 unique records) Warn on sensitive attachments without Microsoft Information Protection labels, and detect when attachments labelled as ‘Confidential’ are sent to unauthorized accounts Educate and remind users when a sensitive attachment has been labelled as ‘Public’ or ‘General’  Set up intelligent information barriers to prevent sensitive data sharing between teams Detect PII/PHI shared externally in bulk Detect financial data such as credit card numbers and bank account numbers Detect unencrypted personal health information shared externally Block attachments containing high volumes of PII from being sent to unauthorized accounts Use Architect to migrate and simplify DLP policies from legacy tools and consolidate related policies using powerful logic blocks. Use Architect to enhance rule-based legacy DLP policies with machine learning such as Tessian’s sensitivity algorithm and minimise the number of false positives
How Does Tessian Architect Work? Let’s take a deeper look at the product.  Create Custom Policies or Deploy Pre-built Tessian DLP Policies These new DLP capabilities allow administrators to quickly and easily build DLP policies to meet basic and advanced data loss requirements, including establishing and maintaining regulatory compliance.  Choose from pre-built policies that solve for your specific use cases or industry requirements, or build your own policies to meet your unique organization’s needs. Use community policies to adopt best practices sources from industry leaders in the Tessian Network. Policies may contain any number of DLP conditions and can be simple or complex, rely entirely on machine learning, basic rules, or both. Testing, tuning and rolling out policies can be done within hours, not days, weeks, or months. Test a policy change in production in as little as one minute. 
Analyze Email DLP Policy Performance Across Your Security Environment Quickly view real-time policy performance and determine what types of data loss are most prevalent in your organization. Insights are provided such as the number of data loss events detected, as well as information about those data loss incidents within specified time periods.
Policy Editor Provides Maximum Protection for Sensitive Data Build advanced, nested-logic policies and consolidate multiple policies that are related to similar topics. This is needed for advanced use cases to allow companies to consolidate and simplify policies as they’re migrating legacy DLP policies.
Integrate with Any Data Classification System, including Microsoft Information Protection (MIP)  Combine the machine learning and behavioral approach of Tessian with Microsoft Information Protection and data classification to further protect against sensitive data loss. Tessian detects sensitive attachments without Microsoft Information Protection labels. In addition, Tessian will also detect when data labeled “confidential” is about to be sent to unauthorized parties.
In-the-Moment Educational Warnings to Stop Accidental Data Loss and Sensitive Data Exfiltration in Real-Time Tessian warnings act as in-the-moment training for employees, continuously educating them about exfiltration, reinforcing your policies, and nudging them toward safe email behavior. Automatically build individualized policies at scale to reduce high-risk email use and track trends in unsafe activity over time.
Benefits of Tessian Architect 1. Automatically Stop Sensitive Data Exfiltration to Unauthorized Parties: Whether it’s an employee negligently sending emails to unauthorized or personal accounts, or individuals maliciously stealing company intellectual property, Tessian automatically stops sensitive data from being sent to any unauthorized recipients. 2. Automated and Pre-built DLP Policies: Take the guesswork out of building DLP policies with Tessian’s policy library, with the flexibility to build your own to adhere to your organization’s unique data protection requirements. 3. Reduce Admin Burden by Order of Magnitude: Reduce admin overhead with end-user remediation and powerful policy logic that simplifies DLP configurations. Cut through noisy DLP alerts and gain new visibility of high severity incidents and anomalous activity. 4. Ensure Regulatory Compliance: Protect against non-compliant activity and prevent users from sharing confidential data with non-business, personal addresses /unauthorized recipients; track and block compliance breaches in real-time. 5. Clear ROI: Many solutions simply report on data loss events; they don’t actually reduce sensitive data exfiltration and risk to the organization. Tessian is different. Security leaders can easily build and deploy DLP policies and show how those policies are proactively helping to improve the organization’s security posture. The benefit? You’ll become a trusted partner across your organization.
Learn more about Data Loss Prevention for the Human Layer  Tessian uses behavioral analysis to address the problem of accidental or intentional data loss by applying human understanding to data exfiltration incidents. Guardian: Automatically prevents accidental data loss via misdirected emails and misattached files. No rules required. Enforcer: Automatically prevents data exfiltration and other non-compliant activities on email  Human Layer Security Intelligence: Comprehensive visibility into employee risks, threat insights, and tools that enable rapid threat investigation and proactive risk mitigation Human Layer Risk Hub: Enables security and risk management teams to deeply understand their organization’s email security posture, including individual user risk levels and drivers Learn more about Tessian Interested in learning more about Tessian Architect? Current Tessian customers can get in touch with their Customer Success Manager. Not yet a Tessian customer? Learn more about Tessian Architect, or book a demo now.
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Email DLP, Data Exfiltration, Compliance, Integrated Cloud Email Security
You Sent an Email to the Wrong Person. Now What?
by Maddie Rosenthal Monday, October 4th, 2021
So, you’ve accidentally sent an email to the wrong person. Don’t worry, you’re not alone. According to Tessian research, over half (58%) of employees say they’ve sent an email to the wrong person.   We call this a misdirected email and it’s really, really easy to do. It could be a simple spelling mistake, it could be the fault of Autocomplete, or it could be an accidental “Reply All”. But, what are the consequences of firing off an email to the wrong person and what can you do to prevent it from happening?   We’ll get to that shortly. But first, let’s answer one of the internet’s most popular (and pressing) questions: Can I stop or “un-send” an email?
Can I un-send an email?   The short (and probably disappointing) answer is no. Once an email has been sent, it can’t be “un-sent”. But, with some email clients, you can recall unread messages that are sent to people within your organization.    Below, we’ll cover Outlook/Office 365 and Gmail. Recalling messages in Outlook & Office 365   Before reading any further, please note: these instructions will only work on the desktop client, not the web-based version. They also only apply if both you (the sender) and the recipient use a Microsoft Exchange account in the same organization or if you both use Microsoft 365.    In simple terms: You’ll only be able to recall unread emails to people you work with, not customers or clients. But, here’s how to do it.   Step 1: Open your “Sent Items” folder Step 2: Double-click on the email you want to recall Step 3: Click the “Message” tab in the upper left-hand corner of the navigation bar (next to “File”) → click “Move” → click “More Move Actions” → Click “Recall This Message” in the dropdown menu Step 4: A pop-up will appear, asking if you’d like to “Delete unread copies of the message” or “Delete unread copies and replace with a new message” Step 5: If you opt to draft a new message, a second window will open and you’ll be able to edit your original message   While this is easy enough to do, it’s not foolproof. The recipient may still receive the message. They may also receive a notification that a message has been deleted from their inbox. That means that, even if they aren’t able to view the botched message, they’ll still know it was sent. There’s more information about recalling emails in Outlook here.  
Recalling messages in Gmail   Again, we have to caveat our step-by-step instructions with an important disclaimer: this option to recall messages in Gmail only works if you’ve enabled the “Delay” function prior to fat fingering an email. The “Delay” function gives you a maximum of 30 seconds to “change your mind” and claw back the email.    Here’s how to enable the “Delay” function.   Step 1: Navigate to the “Settings” icon → click “See All Settings” Step 2: In the “General” tab, find “Undo Send” and choose between 5, 10, 20, and 30 seconds.  Step 3: Now, whenever you send a message, you’ll see “Undo” or “View Message” in the bottom left corner of your screen. You’ll have 5, 10, 20, or 30 seconds to click “Undo” to prevent it from being sent.    Note: If you haven’t set-up the “Delay” function, you will not be able to “Undo” or “Recall” the message. There’s more information about delaying and recalling emails in Gmail here.   So, what happens if you can’t recall the email? We’ve outlined the top six consequences of sending an email to the wrong person below. 
What are the consequences of sending a misdirected email?   According to Verizon’s 2021 DBIR, misdelivery is the most common type of error to cause a breach. But is a breach the biggest consequence?   We asked employees in the US and UK what they considered the biggest consequences of sending a misdirected email. Here’s what they had to say. !function(e,t,s,i){var n="InfogramEmbeds",o=e.getElementsByTagName("script"),d=o[0],r=/^http:/.test(e.location)?"http:":"https:";if(/^\/{2}/.test(i)&&(i=r+i),window[n]&&window[n].initialized)window[n].process&&window[n].process();else if(!e.getElementById(s)){var a=e.createElement("script");a.async=1,a.id=s,a.src=i,d.parentNode.insertBefore(a,d)}}(document,0,"infogram-async","//e.infogram.com/js/dist/embed-loader-min.js");   Importantly, though, the consequences of sending a misdirected email depend on who the email was sent to and what information was contained within the email.   For example, if you accidentally sent a snarky email about your boss to your boss, you’ll have to suffer red-faced embarrassment (which 36% of employees were worried about).   If, on the other hand, the email contained sensitive customer, client, or company information and was sent to someone outside of the relevant team or outside of the organization entirely, the incident would be considered a data loss incident or data breach.   That means your organization could be in violation of data privacy and compliance standards and may be fined. But, incidents or breaches don’t just impact an organization’s bottom line. It could result in lost customer trust, a damaged reputation, and more.
Let’s take a closer look at each of these consequences.   Fines under compliance standards Both regional and industry-specific data protection laws outline fines and penalties for the failure to implement effective security controls that prevent data loss incidents. Yep, that includes sending misdirected emails.   Under GDPR, for example, organizations could face fines of up to 4% of annual global turnover, or €20 million, whichever is greater.    And these incidents are happening more often than you might think. Misdirected emails are the number one security incident reported to the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO). They’re reported 20% more often than phishing attacks.  Lost customer trust and increased churn Today, data privacy is taken seriously, and not just by regulatory bodies.    Research shows that organizations see a 2-7% customer churn after a data breach and 20% of employees say that their company lost a customer after they sent a misdirected email.   A data breach can (and does) undermine the confidence that clients, shareholders, and partners have in an organization. Whether it’s via a formal report, word-of-mouth, negative press coverage, or social media, news of lost – or even misplaced – data can drive customers to jump ship. Revenue loss Naturally, customer churn + hefty fines = revenue loss. But, organizations will also have to pay out for investigation and remediation and for future security costs.   How much? According to IBM’s latest Cost of a Data Breach report, the average cost of a data breach today is $3.86 million. Reputation damage As an offshoot of lost customer trust and increased customer churn, organizations will – in the long-term – also suffer from a damaged reputation. Like we’ve said: people take data privacy seriously.   That’s why, today, strong cybersecurity actually enables businesses and has become a unique selling point in and of itself. It’s a competitive differentiator. Of course, that means that a cybersecurity strategy that’s proven ineffective will detract from your business.   But, individuals may also suffer from a damaged reputation or, at the very least, will be embarrassed. For example, the person who sent the misdirected email may be labeled careless and security leaders might be criticized for their lack of controls. This could lead to…. Job loss Unfortunately, data breaches – even those caused by a simple mistake – often lead to job losses. It could be the Chief Information Security Officer, a line manager, or even the person who sent the misdirected email. Our Psychology of Human report found 1 in 4 people who made email mistakes at work subsequently lost their jobs.   It goes to show that security really is about people. That’s why, at Tessian, we take a human-centric approach and, across three solutions, we prevent human error on email, including accidental data loss via misdirected emails.
How does Tessian prevent misdirected emails?   Tessian Cloud Email Security intelligently prevents advanced email threats and protects against data loss, to strengthen email security and build smarter security cultures in modern enterprises. It turns an organization’s email data into its best defense against human error on email.   Importantly, Tessian’s technology automatically updates its understanding of human behavior and evolving relationships through continuous analysis and learning of the organization’s email network.    That means that if, for example, you frequently worked with “Jim Morris” on one project but then stopped interacting with him over email, Tessian would understand that he probably isn’t the person you meant to send your most recent (highly confidential) project proposal to. Crisis averted.    Interested in learning more about how Tessian can help prevent accidental data loss and data exfiltration in your organization? You can read some of our customer stories here or book a demo.
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Email DLP, Customer Stories
Customer Story: How Tessian Helped a Private Equity Firm Achieve Threat Visibility Through A Platform Approach
by Maddie Rosenthal Tuesday, September 28th, 2021
With over 35 years of investment history, this private equity firm headquartered in Boston, MA, currently has more than 130 investments and nearly 200 employees. Having been a customer since 2018, the firm’s Senior Security Administrator shared how Tessian Guardian and Tessian Enforcer have helped him and his team prevent outbound threats while reducing admin overhead.  Tessian Solutions Enforcer:  Automatically prevents data exfiltration and other non-compliant activities on email. Enforcer can be easily configured to silently track, warn, or block sensitive emails. Guardian: Automatically prevents accidental data loss via misdirected emails and misattached files. No rules required.
Security Environment After Deploying Tessian The benefits of the platform approach The less tools security teams have to manage, the better. Especially since it can be difficult to get a single view of risk when having to pull insights from multiple sources. That’s why the firm bought into Tessian; it solves multiple use cases across one platform, including data exfiltration, accidental data loss, and advanced impersonation attacks.  And, with Human Layer Risk Hub, their security team gets granular visibility into employee risk and insights into individual risk levels and drivers. Today, they can differentiate between employees at different levels of risk, and evolve to support each group in unique, personalized ways through training, policies, and in-platform tools.  Find answers faster with Tessian integrations Integrations with other tools are key. And, while Tessian integrates with well over a dozen products, including SIEM/SOARs, SSO tools, and directory management tools,  these are the two Tessian integrations that stand out for the firm’s Senior Security Administrator: Azure Directory: While Azure Directory (AD) groups are a source of truth, building and maintaining them takes a lot of time and effort. Worse still, many security solutions don’t connect with AD groups, which makes zeroing in on an incident or potential risk that applies to a wider group of users is impossible. This forces security teams to look at each individual mailbox or user and aggregate them, which can take days. But, because Tessian syncs with AD, all you need to do is select the group. That means you can find what you’re looking for and take action right away. SIEM Integrations:  Tessian seamlessly integrates with SIEMs like Splunk and Rapid7. In  future, this will allow the firm’s security team to import valuable Tessian data for a more complete picture of their security posture.  According to their security team, the key to effectively garnering insights from data platforms is to decide what data is the most meaningful. That way, SOC teams can reduce the noise, focus on what’s truly valuable, and make informed security decisions.
Empower users without getting in the way Because Tessian is powered by machine learning instead of rules, it’s able to detect data exfiltration attempts and misdirected emails with incredible accuracy. In fact, on average, employees receive just two warning messages per month. That means when an email is flagged, they pay attention. Better still, Tessian gets smarter over time, and evolves in tandem with changing relationships. As data becomes more accurate, false positives decrease. And with a decrease in false positives, comes an increase in trust.
hbspt.cta.load(1670277, 'fddca6cf-a773-4cc6-9e0a-70ff134bc49d', {"useNewLoader":"true","region":"na1"});   Want to learn more about how Tessian can help you prevent data loss on email? Book a demo now.
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Email DLP, ATO/BEC
New ESG Report Highlights Gaps in M365 Native Security Tools
by Jessica Cooper Tuesday, September 28th, 2021
Millions of companies around the world depend daily on Microsoft 365, including yours. So to better understand its native security tools, and any gaps within them, we’ve partnered with Enterprise Strategy Group (ESG Global) to produce a new report exploring Microsoft 365’s security environments.  The report covers several topics of Microsoft 365, both E3 and E5, including capabilities and gaps for protecting against ransomware, phishing, accidental data loss and sensitive data exfiltration, as well as architectural challenges to consider. The full report, ESG Whitepaper: Closing Critical Gaps in Microsoft 365 Native Security Tools can be found here. Report highlights Phishing was involved in 43% of breaches in the past year Over two-thirds (69%) of respondents to the ESG research survey report that email security has become one of their top 5 cybersecurity priorities 18% cite email security as their most important cybersecurity priority 62% of organizations are reevaluating all security controls currently available natively Ransomware ranks as a top-3 risk concern, with 77% of organizations classifying ransomware as high or medium risk. 45% or organizations report that more than 40% of their sensitive data flows through their email application. Cloud-delivered email solutions aren’t a panacea. Moving on-prem email solutions to the cloud replaces the operational infrastructure but doesn’t necessarily fully replace security controls. Successful credential phishing attacks can lead to email account takeover (ATO), enabling hackers to appear as legitimate insiders, facilitating BEC, data exfiltration, and ransomware.
As the report states, email continues to be the backbone of enterprise communications and is considered the most critical infrastructure to daily operations for most. Cloud-delivered email infrastructure has rapidly become the preferred approach to enable email communications, with over 2.3m companies depending on Microsoft 365. For many, handing over email infrastructure to a cloud service provider means transferring and trusting email security and resilience to the provider. Yet as phishing, which was involved in 43% of breaches in the past year, continues at epidemic levels, over two-thirds (69%) of respondents to an ESG research survey report say that email security has become one of their top 5 cybersecurity priorities, with 18% citing email security as their most important cybersecurity priority. While cloud-delivered email providers promise security and resilience, most fall short of what many security and IT teams would consider adequate. Further, adversaries are capitalizing on these homogenous security systems to bypass controls. As a result, ESG research found that 62% of organizations are re-evaluating all security controls currently available natively, with many turning to third-party email security and resilience solutions to supplement native controls. Organizations that are planning to move or have recently moved to cloud-based email should strongly consider the use of third-party email security solutions to ensure that critical email infrastructure and data are adequately secured against the expanding email threat landscape.    Unpacking Microsoft 365 native security controls in E3 and E5 While Microsoft has invested significantly in strengthening security controls for Microsoft 365 (M365), organizations report continuing gaps in the controls included in both E3 and E5 licensing bundles.    Email security While EOP provides many valuable security features, it is limited in its ability to protect against more sophisticated email attacks, such as social engineering (or “spear-phishing”), business email compromise, account takeover, and many types of ransomware. Detecting these types of more sophisticated attacks requires both behavioral analytics and a contextual understanding of individual communication activities, which don’t exist in EOP. So, while native controls are effective at detecting mass/generic phishing campaigns, they are less effective at detecting highly targeted attacks. For example, EOP uses block lists to detect spam and known malware. Safe Links (available in E5) rewrites URLs and checks them against known lists of malicious URLs before allowing the user to visit the link. Microsoft 365 E5 bundle includes additional security features by adding the Microsoft 365 Defender endpoint security solution. Additional protection against phishing and ransomware is provided through more advanced malicious URL and attachment protection, including link re-writing and attachment sandboxing. Both approaches, however, can still be vulnerable to new URLs and attacks without “payloads.” Microsoft Defender depends on multiple scan engines to detect malware attachments and malicious URL links, leveraging both signature matching and machine learning to perform behavioral analysis. Because BEC and ATO impersonations often contain no malicious links or attachments, these threats can commonly escape this approach.    Data loss prevention Minimal data loss protection capabilities are included in the E3 bundle, relying on end-users to manually label documents as sensitive to protect them. Relying on end-users to accurately and consistently classify content puts organizations at risk. On the other hand, applying blanket policies and blocking sensitive information is highly disruptive to users’ productivity and can be an immense burden on security teams. Further, companies that opt for applying a default classification to all documents and emails end up with the same label being applied to everything, while lacking any new visibility into sensitive data. As a result, organizations most often resort to tracking and post remediation instead of proactive detection and real-time response. Additionally, E3 lacks capabilities natively to detect and manage insider risk (for example, preventing data theft by departing employees). Native controls also often lack the ability to properly classify non-Microsoft data and files, requiring admins to use workarounds to achieve consistent protection.  Data loss prevention is included in the E5 bundle for emails, Teams, and files. Advanced email encryption functionality is also provided, as well as email retention policies. Customer keys for Office 365 are also supported, and some level of insider risk management capabilities is also included.    Context matters in data loss prevention M365 Email DLP capabilities are, however, not context-aware (meaning that they lack context between parties exchanging email), resulting in an inability to proactively identify wrong recipients or unintended inclusion of attachments. M365 detection instead utilizes a rules-based approach to define DLP policies and classify data (regex pattern matches, proximity of certain keywords to the matching patterns, exact data matching, and fingerprinting). These techniques alone are often unable to detect when email recipients are misaddressed or when wrong attachments are involved.  Additionally, because these capabilities rely on rule-based techniques or trainable classifiers to align specific data types with DLP policies and to label data (using Azure Information Protection), effectively detecting sensitive information in unstructured data can be problematic (legal, mergers and acquisitions, work orders, bidding documents, and other non-Microsoft formatted files), resulting in users exfiltrating sensitive data and additional false positives. While encryption is often mistakenly perceived as a solution to solve for misdirected emails, recipients included by mistake can still often decrypt emails to gain access to sensitive data. User experience/friction when encrypting emails can also be a barrier to use. 
Email security has long been focused on inbound filtering and the monitoring of user activities looking for well-known patterns of misuse. Yet email usage patterns are more often unique to individual users, those that they communicate with, what they communicate, and how they communicate. This individual usage context is required to detect and stop many of today’s more sophisticated attacks such as spear phishing, BEC, and ATO.  Much of this personal context can be derived through behavioral analytics of historical email, including the analysis of who, what, and when emails were sent in the past. When individual historical patterns, along with context, can be matched against future activity, modern email threats can be detected and stopped, often with little to no user or administrator involvement.  Microsoft 365, the dominant cloud-delivered email solution adopted today, may lack critical security controls needed for certain organizations, therefore motivating many to add supplemental security solutions to close gaps. Whether in the planning stage, implementation stage, or post-implementation, third-party email security controls should be considered with all cloud-delivered email solutions.  To learn more, download the full report.
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Customer Stories, Email DLP
Customer Story: How Tessian Combines Data Loss Prevention With Education in Financial Services
Monday, September 20th, 2021
Having deployed Tessian at the end of 2020, Israel Bryski, Head of Information Security at an investment management firm headquartered in NYC, shared how Tessian has helped him and his team improve their security posture while changing employee behavior long-term.  The firm, which was formed in the early 1980s, has offices across Spain, Germany, the UK, and Singapore, and currently has 200 employees managing retirement plans and investments for roughly 30,000 current and former Mckinsey employees. Their journey to Tessian Before working with Tessian, the firm had their developers build a custom Outlook add-in to prevent accidental data loss via misdirected emails  Every time someone would send an outbound email to an external domain, they would get a pop-up asking them, “Are you sure to send to this domain?” But, because there was no context in the pop-up, it wasn’t as effective as it could have been immediately following roll-out. Employees were still blindly ignoring the warning, and accidentally sending emails to the wrong person.  At the same time, the security team was also struggling to make security awareness training engaging and relevant to employees Solution Guardian: Automatically prevents accidental data loss via misdirected emails and misattached files. No rules required. Human Layer Risk Hub: Enables security and risk management teams to deeply understand their organization’s email security posture, including individual user risk levels and drivers
Security Environment After Deploying Tessian Explaining the “why” behind policies to change behavior For Israel and his team, education is key.  Having learned from their custom-built Outlook Add-In which warned employees when an email was being sent to the wrong email address, but didn’t offer insight into the “why”, the team wanted to find a solution that offered context and that would bolster their security awareness training programs. They found that in Tessian and, since deployment, they’ve actually seen a change in behavior and a reduction in data loss incidents. 
Learn more about why in-the-moment warnings are so effective. Because Tessian is powered by machine learning instead of rules, it’s able to detect data exfiltration attempts and misdirected emails with incredible accuracy. In fact, on average, employees receive just two warning messages per month. That means when an email is flagged, they pay attention. Better still, Tessian gets smarter over time and evolves in tandem with changing relationships. As data becomes more accurate, false positives decrease. And with a decrease in false positives, comes an increase in trust.
Preventing accidental data loss without impeding productivity  Since deploying Tessian, over 100 data loss incidents have been prevented.  Israel shared an example:  Someone at the firm created a goodbye video for a senior exec who was retiring; they meant to send it to a colleague for them to play the video in the goodbye meeting. When the sender put the address in the To field, they typed in the first letters, and another external vendor’s email popped up that was cached. They didn’t pay attention, added that address to the email, and tried to send it.  When he went to send the email, he got the Guardian pop-up asking him if that vendor’s address was really meant to be part of the group of recipients. He read the contextualized warning, removed that particular vendor, and added the correct recipient.  It goes to show: Tessian does more than prevent breaches. It also saves employees from red-faced embarrassment. Israel and his team have gotten kudos from quite a few people in the firm. One exec in particular was always casting a shadow over the different security tools that had been deployed. He explained, saying “When we got kudos from him, that was a big win in my book! He actually sees the value of Tessian, why we’re purchasing new technology, and why we’re constantly evaluating new solutions on the market that can augment and complement our security program.” 
Interested in learning more about how Tessian can help prevent accidental data loss in your organization? You can read some of our customer stories here or book a demo.
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Email DLP
How to Close Critical Data Loss Prevention (DLP) Gaps in Microsoft 365
by Jessica Cooper Wednesday, September 15th, 2021
Over a million businesses worldwide use Microsoft 365, with 731,000 companies in the United States alone. That represents a big juicy audience for hackers, bad actors and others.   And although Microsoft 365 provides foundational rule-based data loss prevention (DLP) and data classification to address compliance requirements, it falls short when protecting against data loss caused by people. That’s why many of our customers choose Tessian to layer on top of 365, to stop complex, targeted attacks most SEGs just can’t stop. Tessian complements Microsoft 365 with a behavioral analytics layer and offers enhanced data protection by closing critical DLP use case gaps such as inadvertent or accidental data loss, sensitive data exfiltration to unauthorized or personal accounts, and insider risks. Tessian also has more robust investigation, reporting, and remediation tools.   In this article, we’ll explore three DLP challenges, identify where Microsoft 365 falls short, and describe how Tessian helps security teams overcome them Want to explore this topic in greater detail? Download the Solution Brief: How Tessian Closes Critical DLP Gaps in Microsoft 365.   Microsoft 365 can’t stop accidental data loss   Misdirected emails are the number one data security incident reported to data protection regulators across the world. Every day, inadvertent human error on email leads to organizations putting their customer’s data at risk, breaching mandatory industry and data protection regulations and losing highly sensitive intellectual property. In fact, according to Tessian research, 800 misdirected emails are sent every year in organizations with 1,000 employees.   You can check out 11 data breaches caused by misdirected emails here.   Microsoft’s capabilities here are limited to files on Sharepoint and OneDrive sites, where you can allow or block specific domains. It cannot detect if you shared an email or files (including files in Sharepoint) to a wrong party. In addition, Microsoft 365 Email DLP capabilities are not context-aware. What that means in practice is that it lacks context between parties exchanging email and hence cannot proactively identify wrong recipients or wrong attachments.   Microsoft 365 detection is purely based on DLP policies and data classification – Regex pattern matches, proximity of certain keywords to the matching patterns, exact data matching and Fingerprinting. These techniques cannot be applied to detect wrong recipients or wrong attachments.
How does Tessian prevent accidental data loss?   Stop Misdirected Emails Tessian’s behavioral approach ensures that emails reach the right recipients, preventing accidental data breaches over email. Leveraging historical data to map email relationships with context, deep content inspection, and behavioral analysis, Tessian identifies first-time contacts, flags recipient anomalies, and stops misdirected emails in real-time.   Prevent Wrong Attachments Tessian uses a combination of attachment scanning, natural language processing (NLP), and deep content inspection to map email content to users, entities, and projects. This helps detect a variety of anomalies and warns when employees are about to send a wrong attachment.   Easy and Accurate Reporting Insights and analytics makes compliance and reporting easy. Admins can readily filter, view, and track accidental data loss events prevented by type, as either misdirected emails or miss-attached files using the HLS intelligence portal to mitigate events. Learn more about Tessian Guardian.
Microsoft 365 can’t prevent exfiltration of sensitive data to unauthorized or personal accounts Whether it’s an employee negligently sending emails to unauthorized or personal accounts, or individuals maliciously stealing company intellectual property for personal gain while exiting the company, sensitive data exfiltration is a major problem in today’s organizations.   Don’t believe us? 27,500 unauthorized emails are sent every year in organizations with 1,000 employees.   Unfortunately, Microsoft 365 DLP capabilities do not effectively detect when unstructured data leaves the organization. This is because it’s not able to identify the unique context of each employee at a granular level. Traditional approaches to prevent data exfiltration on email rely on a litany of pre-defined rules and denylists, and retrospective incident response.   Tackling the problem of data exfiltration by manually maintaining denylists in a world of innumerable new freemail and personal domains is a losing game. Relying on users to manually classify documents puts organizations at risk, while relying on machine based RegEx classification for sensitive content detection or human-in-the-loop quarantine leads to false positives, false negatives and significant administrative burden.
How does Tessian prevent data exfiltration?   Automatically Detect Non-business Email Accounts with Historical Email Data Tessian analyzes historical email data to understand normal content, context and communication patterns, enabling a comprehensive mapping of every employee’s business and non-business email contacts. Relationship graphs are continuously updated as email behavior changes over time after Tessian is deployed.   Perform Real-time Analysis of Emails Before They’re Sent to Detect Data Exfiltration Tessian’s Human Layer Security Engine analyzes all outbound emails in real-time and uses machine intelligence to automatically predict data exfiltration based on insights from the relationship graph, deep inspection of the email content, and previous user behavior.   Automatically Detect and Prevent Data Exfiltration Over Email With Tessian, you can automatically detect anomalous patterns of exfiltration. Real-time warnings are shown to employees when data exfiltration threats are detected and guides them towards secure behavior. Warning triggers can be tailored to suit your company’s security policies and workflow requirements; employees can be warned, emails can be blocked, or activity can be silently tracked. Employee interactions are also logged for inspection in the Tessian dashboard.   Learn more about Tessian Enforcer.   Microsoft 365 can’t measure and report the impact of insider risks   Insider threats are often perceived to only include those who may have malicious intent, such as disgruntled employees or employees who hack into the organization to gain access to credentials. However, employees exfiltrating data via email are often simply careless or negligent as well.   Microsoft 365 monitoring and reporting capabilities, including insider risk capabilities, are content detection and triage focused and does not provide any type of holistic visibility into employee risk profiles, high risk users in order for security and risk management leaders to take specific actions to improve their employee’s data handling practices and strengthen their security posture.
How does Tessian approach insider risk management? Tessian’s approach is human-centric and behavioral, and is able to detect intent and the unique context of the particular employee’s situation. The Human Layer Security Platform maps employee email activity and builds unique security identities for every individual. Dashboards and analytics surface these insights and give full visibility into threats you’ve never been able to detect before. With Tessian, you can predict and preempt security risks caused by human behavior.   Superior Risk Analytics Enriched individual risk profiles that are modeled with a broad range of signals from email usage patterns, relationship graphs, job role, security decisions in real time as well as from 12 months of historical emails and calculates individual risk scores. Because of this unique data modeling, Tessian provides a profile that is contextually rich with granular visibility into risk drivers.   Dynamic Risk Scoring Security risk scores are dynamically updated to represent an accurate individual risk profile in real time. The risk scores trend down when the user makes positive security decisions and trend up when poor security decisions are made, or if the user exhibits high-risk email security behavior. These scores and risk drivers are also aggregated at the user, department, and company level and are benchmarked against the Tessian network.   Defend Against Data Breaches with Defensible Audit Detailed reporting and audit logs provide defensible proof against data breaches. If risk is identified, Tessian’s Risk Hub enables you to formally document all associated events such as exposure, owner, mitigation decisions and actions.  
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Email DLP, Integrated Cloud Email Security
Legacy Data Loss Prevention vs. Human Layer Security
by Jessica Cooper Thursday, September 9th, 2021
Email is the threat vector security leaders are most worried about protecting.  It’s the most common channel for data exfiltration, fraud, and targeted attacks such as impersonation and phishing, and it’s the major point of egress for sensitive data. And, in most cases, the root cause of these incidents is human error.  Employees break the rules, make mistakes, and can easily be tricked or hacked. This begs the question: what’s the best solution? This blog evaluates legacy data loss prevention (DLP) solutions and is based on an extensive whitepaper available for download. The whitepaper provides greater depth and compares human layer security (HLS) with the legacy security solutions discussed here.   Why Aren’t Legacy Data Loss Prevention (DLP) Solutions Effective? While DLP provides value in certain cases, it does not solve the fundamental problem facing organizations – how to keep data secure in the real world where the information and attachments in emails move and are always accessible to anyone.  Once data leaves the point of control, whether at the endpoint or the network, DLP no longer has control over that content.  If your emails contain information and files that are forwarded and accidentally exposed to the wrong people, there is very little that DLP can do. In this blog, we’ll focus on the five biggest problems with legacy DLP solutions. Remember: you can download the whitepaper for a more detailed analysis. Does Not Protect Against Accidental Data Loss Rules-based approaches simply cannot detect accidental data loss – for example, when emails are sent to the wrong people or the wrong file is attached – because there are no regex or pattern matches that can be applied. This level of protection requires context that DLP just doesn’t have. But, it’s important, especially when research shows at least 800 emails are sent to the wrong person every year in organizations with 1,000+ employees. The HLS Difference: Tessian Guardian automatically detects and prevents misdirected emails and misattached files.  DLP Focuses on a Negative Control Model Legacy DLP is very strict with a binary approach to protecting data. It either allows it or blocks it. In a post-perimeter architecture, this is highly disruptive to business and unsustainable. The HLS Difference: Tessian is frictionless; it’s invisible until you need it, which has helped enterprise customers across industries prevent data loss, without impeding productivity. Read our customer stories to learn more.   Slow, Cumbersome and Non-adaptive 85% of security leaders say DLP is admin-intensive.  Legacy DLP must analyze all content and try to match it to block lists. This requires extensive analysis and the matching can be wrong as enterprise email content is constantly changing.  As content and locations get more complex, legacy DLP can develop problems very quickly.  The HLS Difference: Tessian uses contextual machine learning, and our ML models have been trained on more than two billion emails – rich in information on the kind of data people send and receive every day. Importantly, they continue to automatically adapt and learn as human relationships evolve over time. Learn more about our technology.  Difficult and Expensive to Implement While DLP may be regarded as a check-the-box solution for compliance, it is incredibly cumbersome, complex, and expensive to deploy, often requiring huge spend in professional services to implement and maintain.  Typical deployments are at least 12 months which makes it hard to justify the return on investment vs. the security it provides. The HLS Difference: With Tessian, there is no pre-configuration required, and the platform starts preventing threats within 24 hours of deployment.
Limited Threat Visibility Legacy DLP, including Email DLP, Endpoint DLP, and Network DLP offer little to no visibility into employee risk is one of the biggest challenges security and risk management leaders face.  Worse still, when insights around risk are available, it’s siloed and hard to interpret.  Insights around security awareness training exist in separate systems from insights related to threats that have been detected and prevented. There’s no integration which means security leaders can’t get a full view of their risk profile. Without integration and visibility, it’s impossible to take a tailored, proactive approach to preventing threats.  The HLS Difference: With Tessian Human Layer Risk Hub, our customers can now deeply understand their organization’s security posture with granular visibility into employee risk and insights into individual user risk levels and drivers. Learn more about Human Layer Security Tessian uses contextual machine learning to address the problem of accidental or deliberate data loss by applying human understanding to email behavior. Guardian: Automatically prevents accidental data loss via misdirected emails and misattached files. No rules required. Enforcer: Automatically prevents data exfiltration and other non-compliant activities on email  Human Layer Security Intelligence: Comprehensive visibility into employee risks, threat insights, and tools that enable rapid threat investigation and proactive risk mitigation Human Layer Risk Hub: Enables security and risk management teams to deeply understand their organization’s email security posture, including individual user risk levels and drivers
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