Human Layer Security
20 Virtual Cybersecurity Events To Attend in 2020 (Updated August 2020)
05 August 2020
Conferences and events are valuable opportunities for professionals to network, develop or learn new skills, and gain valuable insights from leading experts. That’s one reason why, instead of canceling or postponing, many event organizers have opted to take them online.  We’ve rounded up the best virtual events over the next several months and have highlighted why you should attend, what to expect, and the cost (if any).  Note: While, yes, a lot of these events are targeted at security vendors or leaders, non-technical executives like CEOs, CFOs, and COOs also have a lot to gain by tuning in. Keep reading to find out why.  Virtual Cybersecurity Events for 2020 The following 20 events are going ahead virtually and are listed in date order. For the most up-to-date and/or specific event information, including registration details, be sure to visit the event’s website. All information is correct at the time of writing. If the event has an asterisk next to it, Tessian is involved!   That means you’ll have a chance to either watch a session involving one of our own or to “stop by” our virtual booth. Either way, these events are a perfect opportunity to learn more about us and our email security solutions. 1. Black Hat USA*  When: August 1 – 6, 2020 Cost to attend: Free Now back for its 23rd year, Black Hat USA is the world’s leading infosec event that will this year feature speakers from Microsoft, Banco Santander, and RSA. Attendees will benefit from the very latest in security research and trends, with an emphasis this year on current affairs, including election integrity during a global pandemic.  2. GraphQL Summit Worldwide When: August 6 – 7, 2020 Cost to Attend: Free This is a great one to share with your product or engineering teams.  The dedicated summit for GraphQL, an open-source data query language for APIs, will this year include over 1,600 developers, software architects, product leaders, and innovators working together to advance GraphQL best practices. The event’s online format is set to include speakers from Gusto and 8-Bit Press and “Topic Rooms” cover GraphQL best practice, GraphQL for web clients, caching and GraphQL, and much more.  3. CEO Rising Summit 2.0 When: August 11, 2020 Cost to Attend: From $295 for individuals to $1,495 for large groups CEO Rising Summit 2.0 is bringing three prominent figures together – including former Secretary of Defense General James Mattis –  to share lessons from their careers that might help leaders navigate these challenging times post-COVID-19. Three key topic clusters will guide the conversation: leadership in times of crisis, building resilient teams that win, and planning despite uncertainty.  4. IoT World Virtual When: August 11 – 13, 2020 Cost to Attend: Free An online platform bringing together the global IoT community, the IoT World Virtual Event features interactive sessions on IIoT, AI, The Edge, 5G, and more. The three-day conference has a packed agenda and attendees will hear from industry experts from Facebook, Michelin, US Bank, and more. Best of all, attendees will have a chance to engage with speakers and each other through live chats, polls, Q&As, and roundtables. 5. LeadDev Live When: August 12 Cost to Attend: Free LeadDev Live is a one-day virtual conference that includes global engineering and technology leaders who come together to discuss the secret to any successful commercial venture–teamwork! LeadDev’s schedule features talks and interactive panels from some of today’s foremost engineering leaders, including Spotify’s Engineering Manager and the Head of QA & Chief of Staff at Bloomberg. 6. TBI’s Big Event When: August 17 – 21, 2020 Cost to Attend: Free The week-long ‘Big Event’ from TBI focuses on emerging technologies and trends in key industries. Each day is dedicated to a different topic, giving attendees the opportunity to learn about cloud communications, IoT, cybersecurity, and more. Keynote speakers include top market analysts and sales professionals.  7. Ai4 AI Conference* When: August 18 – 20, 2020 Cost to Attend: Free for qualifying applicants (senior-level officials at organizations with 250+ employees) Split over three days, Ai4 2020 facilitates the adoption of AI and machine learning technology by delivering use-case orientated content and actionable insights to business leaders, data practitioners, and key players in the AI arena. Open only to specific industries, this year’s event will invite over 100 speakers from some of the world’s most innovative firms which are heavily involved in AI projects.  8. FinTech Digital Summit* When: August 20, 2020 Cost to Attend: Free for attendees in the financial and insurance sectors. For technology providers and those from other sectors, £395.00+VAT.  Taking place via Zoom, the virtual summit will cover the latest FinServ trends with panel discussions and presentations. Although there’s a lot to be discussed about COVID-19 and the challenges it poses, the event will also look at current compliance issues, RegTech, and how to tackle the industry’s current skills gap.  One lucky attendee will also win a brand-new Apple Watch at the end of the event!  9. The Diana Initiative When: August 21 – 22, 2020 Cost to Attend: $5.00+$1.94 Fee The Diana Initiative is focused on women, diversity, and inclusion in Information Security. Why does this matter? Because women currently make up less than a quarter of the workforce. You can read more about this in Tessian’s research: Opportunity in Cybersecurity Report 2020. Importantly, though, this event embraces all genders and sexualities. The goal is simply to educate attendees about opportunities, challenges, and trends in infosec. The speaker list has been announced (which you can find here) and there are some big names on the list, including women from LinkedIn and The New York Times.  Bonus: Lockpick Extreme is hosting virtual lockpicking workshops. You’re welcome.  10. Reuters Customer Service & Experience Europe August 26 – 27, 2020 This is a great event to invite key executives outside of cybersecurity to. Why? Because customer service is essential for success and it relies on teams across the organization. This event will cover how customer expectations have changed post-COVID, why data-driven insights are so crucial for success, and how to use technology to automate and streamline processes. These are important conversations for security, IT, and compliance professionals to be involved in because, well, customer data is involved.  Cost to Attend: Free, but an all-access premium pass is available for £299 11. ILTA>ON* When: August 24 – 28, 2020 Cost to Attend: From $99 for a day pass ($199 for non-members), $350 for the full event ($599 non-members), and $1,595 for up to five people from one firm available to ILTA members only A five-day conference for the legaltech community, ILTA>ON offers a range of comprehensive peer-driven programs, networking opportunities, and educational content in a collaborative online format. Attendees can also qualify for self-reported accreditations to help enhance their careers.  12. SaaStr Annual When: September 2 – 3, 2020 Cost to Attend: Free for up to five select keynote sessions on September 3. Starting from $329 for full access to all content, networking, and mentorship.  A conference for the SaaS industry, SaaStr Annual is a flagship event that is going online for its first time in six years in September. The event brings together SaaS executives, founders, and entrepreneurs and this year, the line-up includes Twitter’s VP of Engineering and the CEO of Stack Overflow.  13. Human Layer Security Summit When: September 9, 2020 Cost to Attend: Free The Human Layer Security Summit is back after a hugely successful virtual event in June. See what you missed last time here: 13 Things We Learned at Tessian Virtual Human Layer Security Summit. What can guests expect this time? Once again, leaders from some of the world’s top organizations – including AWS, Salesforce, Stanford University, The FBI, and TrustedSec – will share their experiences and tips around how to create future-proofed security strategies. You’ll get a hacker’s point of view, learn from a psychological perspective why people make mistakes that lead to data breaches, and see what industry experts think we should all be preparing for next.  You can check out the agenda and register here. 14. AUSCERT 2020 Cyber Security Conference When: September 15 – 18, 2020 Cost to Attend: Free, but you must register for tutorials individually, one-by-one.  In light of the ongoing Coronavirus situation, AUSCERT has reimagined its annual conference and has converted it into a dynamic and interactive virtual experience. Attendees will be able to attend AUSCERT’s full schedule of sessions and interact with leading experts in the cyber and information security industry, engage in tutorials and workshops, and take part in virtual networking events.  15. RiskSec Digital 2020 When: September 16 – 17, 2020 Cost to Attend: Free Over two mornings, RiskSec promises a first-rate content conversation and exhibition hall experience…all from the comfort of attendees’ homes.  This year, the conference focuses on how cybersecurity professionals face an uphill battle when it comes to being resilient against a constantly growing attack surface in an increasingly unpredictable world.  16. HR of Tomorrow Conference Europe When: September 21 – 22, 2020 Cost to Attend: €900 but discounts may be available by contacting the organizer. The HR of Tomorrow conference includes 100+ HR experts and decision-makers from all around the world, such as VPs of HR, CHROs, and Directors from leading global companies. The event will feature 35 talks from HR experts across two days, consisting of speeches, panel discussions, and workshops. What does HR have to do with cybersecurity? People! This is a great opportunity for security leaders to learn how to work more closely with HR to build a better security culture.  17. FORTUNE Most Powerful Women Summit When: September 29 – October 1, 2020 Cost to Attend: Free ($13,500 for MPW membership)  FORTUNE MPW is the world’s biggest leadership community and summit for preeminent women in business and leaders in key sectors (including cyber!) and government. This year’s theme is “Rising to the New Reality” and will reflect heavily on the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.  18. Accounting & Finance Show When: October 20 – October 21, 2020 Cost to Attend: Free  The Accounting & Finance Show is the USA’s largest virtual accounting and finance exhibition. With over 150 speakers and 3,000 attendees, the exhibition features online networking, virtual workshops, and CPE education. Content tracks include HCM & Payroll, Tax, Technology, and Practice Management. Why attend? If you’re a security leader in Financial Services, this is a great opportunity to connect with your peers and understand what they’re doing to overcome current challenges.  19. Futurist Virtual Conference When: November 11 – 12, 2020 Cost to Attend: Free Futurist Virtual Conference is Canada’s largest blockchain and emerging tech conference. Over 100 world-class speakers are attending this year to discuss emerging industries and their trends, and attendees have the option to sit in on over 60 panel sessions, workshops, and roundtables.  20. NewStatesman Virtual Cyber Security in Financial Services Conference When: November 24, 2020 Cost to Attend: Free for senior-level delegates from financial institutions. At this year’s virtual conference, senior figures and thought leaders will lead presentations that examine current regulations and key trends. Some of the presentations include: How the COVID-19 pandemic has changed the cybersecurity landscape Building cyber resilience in the new decade How biometric innovation is shaping the future Are there any other events you think we should add to this list? Email [email protected]
Compliance Data Loss Prevention Human Layer Security
You Sent an Email to the Wrong Person. Now What?
By Maddie Rosenthal
04 August 2020
So, you’ve sent an email to the wrong person. Don’t worry, you’re not alone. According to Tessian research, over half (58%) of employees say they’ve sent an email to the wrong person.  We call this a misdirected email and it’s really, really easy to do. It could be a simple spelling mistake, it could be the fault of Autocomplete, or it could be an accidental “Reply All”. But, what are the consequences of firing off an email to the wrong person and what can you do to prevent it from happening?  We’ll get to that shortly. But first, let’s answer one of the internet’s most popular (and pressing) questions: Can I stop or “un-send” an email?
Can I un-send an email? The short (and probably disappointing) answer is no. Once an email has been sent, it can’t be “un-sent”. But, with some email clients, you can recall unread messages that are sent to people within your organization.  Below, we’ll cover Outlook/Office 365 and Gmail. Recalling messages in Outlook & Office 365 Before reading any further, please note: these instructions will only work on the desktop client, not the web-based version. They also only apply if both you (the sender) and the recipient use a Microsoft Exchange account in the same organization or if you both use Microsoft 365.  In layman’s terms: You’ll only be able to recall unread emails to people you work with, not customers or clients. But, here’s how to do it. Step 1: Open your “Sent Items” folder Step 2: Double-click on the email you want to recall Step 3: Click the “Message” tab in the upper left-hand corner of the navigation bar (next to “File”) → click “Move” → click “More Move Actions” → Click “Recall This Message” in the dropdown menu Step 4: A pop-up will appear, asking if you’d like to “Delete unread copies of the message” or “Delete unread copies and replace with a new message” Step 5: If you opt to draft a new message, a second window will open and you’ll be able to edit your original message While this is easy enough to do, it’s not foolproof. The recipient may still receive the message. They may also receive a notification that a message has been deleted from their inbox. That means that, even if they aren’t able to view the botched message, they’ll still know it was sent.  More information about recalling emails in Outlook here. Recalling messages in Gmail Again, we have to caveat our step-by-step instructions with an important disclaimer: this option to recall messages in Gmail only works if you’ve enabled the “Delay” function prior to fat fingering an email. The “Delay” function gives you a maximum of 30 seconds to “change your mind” and claw back the email.  Here’s how to enable the “Delay” function. Step 1: Navigate to the “Settings” icon → click “See All Settings” Step 2: In the “General” tab, find “Undo Send” and choose between 5, 10, 20, and 30 seconds.  Step 3: Now, whenever you send a message, you’ll see “Undo” or “View Message” in the bottom left corner of your screen. You’ll have 5, 10, 20, or 30 seconds to click “Undo” to prevent it from being sent.  Note: If you haven’t set-up the “Delay” function, you will not be able to “Undo” or “Recall” the message.  More information about delaying and recalling emails in Gmail here. So, what happens if you can’t recall the email? We’ve outlined the top six consequences of sending an email to the wrong person below. 
What are the consequences of sending a misdirected email? We asked employees in the US and UK what they considered the biggest consequences of sending a misdirected email. Here’s what they had to say. !function(e,t,s,i){var n="InfogramEmbeds",o=e.getElementsByTagName("script"),d=o[0],r=/^http:/.test(e.location)?"http:":"https:";if(/^\/{2}/.test(i)&&(i=r+i),window[n]&&window[n].initialized)window[n].process&&window[n].process();else if(!e.getElementById(s)){var a=e.createElement("script");a.async=1,a.id=s,a.src=i,d.parentNode.insertBefore(a,d)}}(document,0,"infogram-async","//e.infogram.com/js/dist/embed-loader-min.js"); Importantly, though, the consequences of sending a misdirected email depend on who the email was sent to and what information was contained within the email. For example, if you accidentally sent a snarky email about your boss to your boss, you’ll have to suffer red-faced embarrassment (which 36% of employees were worried about). If, on the other hand, the email contained sensitive customer, client, or company information and was sent to someone outside of the relevant team or outside of the organization entirely, the incident would be considered a data loss incident or data breach. That means your organization could be in violation of data privacy and compliance standards and may be fined. But, incidents or breaches don’t just impact an organization’s bottom line. It could result in lost customer trust, a damaged reputation, and more. Let’s take a closer look at each of these consequences. Fines under compliance standards. Both regional and industry-specific data protection laws outline fines and penalties for the failure to implement effective security controls that prevent data loss incidents. Yep, that includes sending misdirected emails. Under GDPR, for example, organizations could face fines of up to 4% of annual global turnover, or €20 million, whichever is greater.  And these incidents are happening more often than you might think. Misdirected emails are the number one security incident reported to the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO). They’re reported 20% more often than phishing attacks. You can read more about the biggest fines under GDPR so far in 2020 on our blog. Lost customer trust and increased churn. Today, data privacy is taken seriously… and not just by regulatory bodies.  Don’t believe us? Research shows that organizations see a 2-7% customer churn after a data breach and 20% of employees say that their company lost a customer after they sent a misdirected email. A data breach can (and does) undermine the confidence that clients, shareholders, and partners have in an organization. Whether it’s via a formal report, word-of-mouth, negative press coverage, or social media, news of lost – or even misplaced – data can drive customers to jump ship. Revenue loss. Naturally, customer churn + hefty fines = revenue loss. But, organizations will also have to pay out for investigation and remediation and for future security costs. How much? According to IBM’s latest Cost of a Data Breach report, the average cost of a data breach today is $3.86 million. Damaged reputation. As an offshoot of lost customer trust and increased customer churn, organizations will – in the long-term – also suffer from a damaged reputation. Like we’ve said: people take data privacy seriously. That’s why, today, strong cybersecurity actually enables businesses and has become a unique selling point in and of itself. It’s a competitive differentiator. Of course, that means that a cybersecurity strategy that’s proven ineffective will detract from your business. But, individuals may also suffer from a damaged reputation or, at the very least, will be embarrassed. For example, the person who sent the misdirected email may be labeled careless and security leaders might be criticized for their lack of controls. This could lead to…. Job loss. Unfortunately, data breaches – even those caused by a simple mistake – often lead to job losses. It could be the Chief Information Security Officer, a line manager, or even the person who sent the misdirected email.  It goes to show that security really is about people. That’s why, at Tessian, we take a human-centric approach and, across three solutions, we prevent human error on email, including accidental data loss via misdirected emails.
How does Tessian prevent misdirected emails? Tessian turns an organization’s email data into its best defense against human error on email. Powered by machine learning, our Human Layer Security technology understands human behavior and relationships, enabling Tessian Guardian to automatically detect and prevent anomalous and dangerous activity like emails being sent to the wrong person. Importantly, Tessian’s technology automatically updates its understanding of human behavior and evolving relationships through continuous analysis and learning of the organization’s email network.  That means that if, for example, you frequently worked with “Jim Morris” on one project but then stopped interacting with him over email, Tessian would understand that he probably isn’t the person you meant to send your most recent (highly confidential) project proposal to. Crisis averted.  Interested in learning more about how Tessian can help prevent accidental data loss and data exfiltration in your organization? You can read some of our customer stories here or book a demo.
Customer Stories Data Loss Prevention Human Layer Security
Data Leakage and Exfiltration: 7 Problems Tessian Helps Solve
03 August 2020
On Wednesday, July 29, Tessian hosted a webinar with two customers: Euromoney Institutional Investor and ERT. The topic? Data exfiltration and reduced visibility while workforces are remote. Martyn Booth, Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) at Euromoney Institutional Investor and Ted Crawford, Chief Information Officer (CIO) at ERT both offered incredible insights about how things have changed from a security perspective over the last four months and how Tessian has helped them lock down email, even before their employees started working from home. And, because Martyn and Ted are two security leaders in different industries (Financial Services and Tech/Healthcare respectively) and are based in different regions (England and The United States), they were able to share diverse opinions and experiences. Keep reading to learn more about how Tessian has helped them solve some of their biggest pain points.  7 Problems Tessian Helps Solve 1. Tessian prevents accidental data loss on email When you hear “data exfiltration”, what do you think of?  Many of you probably thought immediately about Insider Threats and other malicious activity. But, as our customers pointed out, most incidents involving data loss are accidental. Or, as Martyn put it, are the result of “naive email usage”. It could be an employee sending an email to the wrong person (we call this a misdirected email), it could be someone hitting “reply all”, or it could be someone emailing a spreadsheet to their personal email account to work on over the weekend.  Harmless, right? Not exactly. If these “accidents” involve sensitive information related to employees, customers, clients, or the company itself, it’s considered a breach.  Organizations can prevent all of the above with Tessian Guardian.  This is especially important now that employees are working remotely. Why? Because the lines between peoples’ personal and professional lives are blurred. Beyond that, people are distracted, stressed, and tired which, as we’ve shown in our latest research report The Psychology of Human Error, increases the likelihood that a mistake will happen. 2. Tessian prevents malicious data exfiltration on email While, yes, many data loss incidents are accidental, some employees do intentionally exfiltrate data. There are a number of reasons why, but financial gain and a competitive edge are the most likely motivators.  Unfortunately, with so many people being laid off, made redundant, or furloughed, many organizations have seen a spike in this type of malicious activity. But, with Tessian Enforcer, organizations’ most sensitive data is kept safe.  Employees attempting to email sensitive information to themselves or a suspicious third-party will receive a warning message, explaining why the email has been flagged and asking if they’re sure they want to proceed. At the same time, security teams will get a notification.
Note: Instead of warning the employee and asking if they’d like to send the email anyway, security teams can easily configure Tessian to automatically quarantine emails that look like data exfiltration. Book a demo to see Tessian in action.  3. Tessian makes it easy to report security risks and communicate ROI  Communicating cybersecurity ROI has historically been a real challenge for security leaders. Not with Tessian. Martyn explained how Tessian enables him to share key results with executives and demonstrate the effectiveness of not just the solution, but his overall strategy. “One of the pillars of our infrastructure strategy was to build transparency across the organization. This comes from sharing metrics. With Tessian, we can show how many alerts were picked up and, each month, we can show the risk committee that we’re reducing the number of alerts. Now, are they actually interested in our preventative controls? I don’t think so. But the whole point of the metrics program is to show how well (or badly) our strategy is performing.  Before, they would make their decision based on cost or how much risk they thought we were going to be mitigating. It was quite subjective. We’ve moved that now into something more data-based. We can actually say “Well, actually, we pay x per year and, as a result of that, we’re going in the right direction in terms of our risk mitigations.” 4. Tessian helps organizations stay compliant  Both Healthcare and Financial Services are highly regulated industries that are bound to several compliance standards beyond GDPR.  That’s why, for Ted, protecting sensitive clinical data and ensuring “privacy and security by design” are both paramount. “There’s a lot of data that we need to protect and prevent from getting outside of the four walls of ERT,” he said. “As an offshoot of GDPR in 2018, we had to classify all of the data, determine from a privacy perspective how to treat it from a sensitivity perspective, and then decide how to treat it from a security perspective. Because it’s very easy to pull sensitive data and incur data loss on email, we needed a solution that would help us ensure data isn’t distributed where it shouldn’t go. That’s why we approached Tessian.” For more information about compliance in Financial Services, check out this article: Ultimate Guide to Data Protection and Compliance in Financial Services.
5. Tessian saves security teams time  While essential for compliance, classifying (and re-classifying) data, monitoring movement, investigating incidents, and generating reports all take a lot of time. That’s why 85% of IT leaders say rule-based DLP is admin-intensive.  With Tessian, security teams don’t have to do any of the above manually. This is a big selling point for Martyn, who said, “That’s where we really see the value with Tessian. It takes the burden off of people in my security team”. Tessian is powered by machine learning algorithms that have been trained on billions of data points. That means our solutions automatically understand what is and isn’t normal behavior for individual employees and can, therefore, detect and prevent threats before they turn into incidents or breaches. No rules required.  You can read more about our technology here.  6. Tessian gives security teams clear visibility of risks We’ve talked a lot about how Tessian detects and prevents risks. But for a solution to be really successful, it has to give security teams clear visibility of the risks in their organization. Tessian’s Human Layer Security platform does both.  With Tessian Human Layer Security Intelligence, our customers can easily and automatically get detailed insights into employee’s actions.  For example, imagine that in a single week, Tessian detects 12 different employees attempting to send sensitive information to their personal email accounts. When warned that sending the email is against company policy, nine of the employees opted to not send the email. The other three went ahead. Knowing this, security leaders can focus their efforts on the three that went ahead and offer additional, targeted training or, if necessary, they can escalate the incident to a line manager to issue a more formal warning.  This also helps predict future behavior. For example, if Tessian flags that an employee has sent upwards of 20 attachments – including Intellectual Property that would be valuable to a competitor – to a recipient he or she has no previous email history with soon after being denied a raise or promotion, security teams could infer that the employee is resigning and taking company data with them.  And, to prevent any further data exfiltration attempts, they can create custom filters specifically for that user, including customized warning messages or a filter that automatically blocks future exfiltration attempts. Before Tessian, this wasn’t possible for Martyn.  “Even if we suspected that an employee was going to go to a competitor and take data, we couldn’t check. We couldn’t see anything that was going up to the Cloud. It was all encrypted. The only way we would be able to see what people were emailing would be to actually go through individual emails to find ones that were problematic. We didn’t have time for that,” he said 
7. Tessian helps reinforce training and improve employee’s security reflexes with in-the-moment warnings In the example above, three employees opted to send an email after being warned that doing so would be against company policy. But, what about the other nine? The warning message changed their behavior! It actually incentivized them to accurately mark emails as confidential or malicious if they were, in fact, confidential or malicious. This is really important. “You can’t take a “big bang” approach to data privacy awareness training. To really see employees empowered, you have to constantly reinforce training,” Ted said.  The bottom line: For training to be effective long-term, employees need to apply what they learn to real-world situations and be reminded of policies in-the-moment. Over time, this will help improve their security reflexes and help build a more positive security culture.  Henry Trevelyan Thomas, the host of the webinar and Tessian’s Head of Customer Success, summarized the benefits of this for both employees and security leaders, “This is a really productive way to help employees take accountability for how they handle data. It democratizes security and takes some of the weight off of the Chief Information Security Officer’s shoulders.” Tessian can help prevent data exfiltration in your organization, too Tessian turns an organization’s email data into its best defense against inbound and outbound email security threats. Powered by machine learning, our Human Layer Security technology understands human behavior and relationships, enabling it to automatically detect and prevent anomalous and dangerous activity. Tessian Enforcer detects and prevents data exfiltration attempts Tessian Guardian detects and prevents misdirected emails Importantly, Tessian’s technology automatically updates its understanding of human behavior and evolving relationships through continuous analysis and learning of the organization’s email network. Oh, and it works silently in the background, meaning employees can do their jobs without security getting in the way.  Interested in learning more about how Tessian can help prevent accidental data loss and data exfiltration in your organization? You can read some of our customer stories here or book a demo.
Human Layer Security Spear Phishing
Pros and Cons of Phishing Awareness Training
By Maddie Rosenthal
03 August 2020
Over the last several weeks, phishing, spear phishing, and social engineering attacks have dominated headlines. But, phishing isn’t a new problem. These scams have been circulating since the mid-’90s.  So, what can security leaders do to prevent being targeted? Unfortunately, not much. Hackers play the odds and fire off thousands of phishing emails at a time, hoping that at least a few will be successful. The key, then, is to train employees to spot these scams. That’s why phishing awareness training is such an essential part of any cybersecurity strategy. But is phishing awareness training alone enough? Keep reading to find out the pros and cons of phishing awareness training as well as the steps security leaders need to take to level up their inbound threat protection. Still wondering how big of a problem phishing really is? Check out the latest phishing statistics for 2020.
To make this article easy-to-navigate, we’ll start with a simple list of the pros and cons of phishing awareness training. For more information about each point, you can click the text to jump down on the page. 
Pros of phishing awareness training Phishing awareness training introduces employees to threats they might not be familiar with While people working in security, IT, or compliance are all-too-familiar with phishing, spear phishing, and social engineering, the average employee isn’t. The reality is, they might not have even heard of these terms. That means phishing awareness training is an essential first step. To successfully spot a phish, they have to know they exist. By showing employees examples of attacks – including the subject lines to watch out for, a high-level overview of domain impersonation, and the types of requests hackers will generally make – they’ll immediately be better placed to identify what is and isn’t a phishing attack.   Looking for resources to help train your employees? Check out this blog with a shareable PDF. It includes examples of phishing attacks and reasons why the email is suspicious.  Phishing awareness training can teach employees more about existing policies and procedures Again, showing employees what phishing attacks look like is step one. But ensuring they know what to do if and when they receive one is an essential next step and is your chance to remind employees of existing policies and procedures. For example, who to report attacks to within the security or IT team. Importantly, though, phishing awareness training should also reinforce the importance of other policies, specifically around creating strong passwords, storing them safely, and updating them frequently. After all, credentials are the number one “type” of data hackers harvest in phishing attacks.  Phishing awareness training can help security leaders identify particularly risky and at-risk employees By getting teams across departments together for training sessions and phishing simulations, security leaders will get a birds’ eye view of employee behavior. Are certain departments or individuals more likely to click a malicious link than others? Are senior executives skipping training sessions? Are new-starters struggling to pass post-training assessments?  These observations will help security leaders stay ahead of security incidents, can inform subsequent training sessions, and could help pinpoint gaps in the overall security framework.
Phishing awareness training can help satisfy compliance standards While you can read more about various compliance standards – including GDPR, CCPA, HIPAA, and GLBA – on our compliance hub, they all include a clause that outlines the importance of implementing proper data security practices. What are “proper data security practices?” This criterion has – for the most part – not been formally defined. But, phishing awareness training is certainly a step in the right direction and demonstrates a concerted effort to secure data company-wide.   Phishing awareness training can help foster a strong security culture In the last several years (due in part to increased regulation) cybersecurity has become business-critical. But, it takes a village to keep systems and data safe, which means accountability is required from everyone to make policies, procedures, and tech solutions truly effective.  That’s why creating and maintaining a strong security culture is so important. While this is easier said than done, training sessions can help encourage employees – whether in finance or sales – to become less passive in their roles as they relate to cybersecurity, especially when gamification is used to drive engagement. You can read more about creating a positive security culture on our blog. Phishing awareness training can enable employees to spot scams in their personal lives, too The point of phishing awareness training is to prevent successful attacks in the workplace. But, it’s important to remember that phishing attacks are targeted at consumers, too. That’s why the most frequently impersonated brands are household names like Netflix and Facebook. Why does this matter? Because phishing attacks have serious consequences, and not just for larger organizations. If an employee was scammed in a consumer attack, they could lose thousands of dollars or even have their identity stolen. It’s hard to imagine a world in which this wouldn’t affect their work. The bottom line: prevention is better than cure and knowledge is power. Phishing awareness training won’t just protect your organization’s data and assets, it’ll empower your people to protect themselves outside of the office, too. 
Cons of phishing awareness training Phishing awareness training can’t prevent human error While phishing awareness training will help employees spot phishing scams and make them think twice before clicking a link or downloading an attachment, it’s not a silver bullet.  Even the most security-conscious and tech-savvy employees can – and do – fall for phishing attacks. Case in point: Employees working in the tech industry are the most likely to click on links in phishing emails, with nearly half (47%)  admitting to having done it. This is 22% higher than the average across all industries. As the saying goes, to “err is human”. Phishing awareness training can’t evolve as quickly as threats do Hackers think and move quickly and are constantly crafting more sophisticated attacks to evade detection. That means that training that was relevant three months may not be today. We only have to look at the spike in COVID-19 themed phishing attacks starting in March for proof. Prior to the outbreak of the pandemic, very few phishing awareness programs would have trained employees to look for impersonations of the World Health Organization, for example. Likewise, impersonations of collaboration tools like Zoom took off as soon as workforces shifted to remote-working. (Click here for more real-life examples of COVID-19 phishing emails.) What could be next?  Phishing awareness training has hidden costs According to Mark Logsdon, Head of Cyber Assurance and Oversight at Prudential, there are three fundamental flaws in training: it’s boring, often irrelevant, and expensive. We’ll cover the first two below but, for now, let’s focus on the cost. Needless to say, the cost of training and simulation software varies vendor-by-vendor. But, the solution itself is far from the only cost to consider. What about lost productivity? Imagine you have a 1,000-person organization and, as a part of an aggressive inbound strategy, you’ve opted to hold training every quarter. Training lasts, on average, three hours. That’s 12,000 lost hours a year.  While – yes – a successful attack would cost more, we can’t forget that phishing awareness training alone doesn’t work. (See point 1: Phishing awareness training can’t prevent human error.)
Phishing awareness training isn’t targeted (or engaging) enough Going back to what Mark Logsdon said: Training is boring and often irrelevant. It’s easy to see why. You can’t apply one lesson to an entire organization – whether it’s 20 people or 20,0000 – and expect it to stick. It has to be targeted based on age, department, and tech-literacy. Age is especially important.  According to Tessian’s latest research, nearly three-quarters of respondents who admitted to clicking a phishing email were aged between 18-40 years old. In comparison, just 8% of people over 51 said they had done the same. However, the older generation was also the least likely to know what a phishing email was. !function(e,t,s,i){var n="InfogramEmbeds",o=e.getElementsByTagName("script"),d=o[0],r=/^http:/.test(e.location)?"http:":"https:";if(/^\/{2}/.test(i)&&(i=r+i),window[n]&&window[n].initialized)window[n].process&&window[n].process();else if(!e.getElementById(s)){var a=e.createElement("script");a.async=1,a.id=s,a.src=i,d.parentNode.insertBefore(a,d)}}(document,0,"infogram-async","//e.infogram.com/js/dist/embed-loader-min.js"); Jeff Hancock, the Harry and Norman Chandler Professor of Communication at Stanford University and expert in trust and deception, explained how tailored training programs could help. “A one-size-fits-all approach won’t work. Different generations have grown up with tech in different ways, and security training needs to reflect this. That’s not to say that we should think that people over 50 are tech-illiterate, though. Businesses need to consider what motivates each age group and tailor training accordingly.”  “Being respected at work is incredibly important to an older generation, so telling them that they don’t understand something isn’t an effective way to educate them on the threats. Instead, businesses should engage them in a conversation, helping them to identify how their strengths and weaknesses could be used against them in an attack.”  “Many younger employees, on the other hand, have never known a time without the internet and they don’t want to be told how to use it. This generation has a thirst for knowledge, so teach them the techniques that hackers will use to target them. That way, when they see a scam, they’ll be able to unpick it and recognize the tactics being used on them.”   Phishing awareness training can’t force employees to care about cybersecurity Unfortunately, the average employee is less focused on cybersecurity and more focused on getting their jobs done. That’s why one-third (33%) rarely or never think about security and work and over half (54%) of employees say they’ll find a workaround if security software or policies prevent them from doing their job.  While – yes – security leaders can certainly reinforce the importance of software and policies, training alone won’t help control employee’s behavior or inspire every single person to become champions of cybersecurity. Phishing awareness can’t change quick-to-click company cultures It’s widely accepted that time pressure negatively impacts decision accuracy. But did you know that individuals who are expected to respond to emails quickly are also the most likely to click on phishing emails?  !function(e,t,s,i){var n="InfogramEmbeds",o=e.getElementsByTagName("script"),d=o[0],r=/^http:/.test(e.location)?"http:":"https:";if(/^\/{2}/.test(i)&&(i=r+i),window[n]&&window[n].initialized)window[n].process&&window[n].process();else if(!e.getElementById(s)){var a=e.createElement("script");a.async=1,a.id=s,a.src=i,d.parentNode.insertBefore(a,d)}}(document,0,"infogram-async","//e.infogram.com/js/dist/embed-loader-min.js"); It makes sense. If you’re rushing to read and fire off emails – especially when you’re working off of laptops, phones, and even watches – you’re more likely to make mistakes.
Should I create a phishing awareness training program? The short answer: Absolutely. Phishing awareness training programs can help teach employees what phishing is, how to spot phishing emails, what to do if they’re targeted, and the implications of falling for an attack. But, as we’ve said, training isn’t a silver bullet. It will curb the problem, but it won’t prevent mistakes from happening. That’s why security leaders need to bolster training with technology that detects and prevents inbound threats. That way, employees aren’t the last line of defense. But, given the frequency of attacks year-on-year, it’s clear that spam filters, antivirus software, and other legacy security solutions aren’t enough. That’s where Tessian comes in. How does Tessian detect and prevent targeted phishing attacks? Tessian fills a critical gap in security strategies that SEGs, spam filters, and training alone can’t.  By learning from historical email data, Tessian’s machine learning algorithms can understand specific user relationships and the context behind each email. This allows Tessian Defender to detect a wide range of impersonations, spanning more obvious, payload-based attacks to difficult-to-spot social-engineered ones like CEO Fraud and Business Email Compromise. Once detected, real-time warnings are triggered and explain exactly why the email was flagged, including specific information from the email. (See below.) This is an important function. Why? Because, according to Jeff, “People learn best when they get fast feedback and when that feedback is in context,” 
These in-the-moment warnings reinforce training and policies and help employees improve their security reflexes over time.  To learn more about how tools like Tessian Defender can prevent spear phishing attacks, speak to one of our experts and request a demo today.
Human Layer Security Spear Phishing
Research Shows How To Prevent Mistakes Before They Become Breaches
By Maddie Rosenthal
22 July 2020
We all make mistakes. But with over two-fifths of employees saying they’ve made mistakes at work that have had security repercussions, businesses need to find a way to stop mistakes from happening before they compromise cybersecurity.  That’s why we developed our report The Psychology of Human Error, with the help of Jeff Hancock, a professor at Stanford University and expert in social dynamics online.  We wanted to understand why these mistakes are happening, rather than simply dismissing incidents of human error as people acting carelessly or labeling people the ‘weakest link’ when it comes to security. By doing so, we hope businesses can better understand how to protect their people, and the data they control.  Key findings: 43% of employees have made mistakes that have compromised cybersecurity A third of workers (33%) rarely or never think about cybersecurity when at work 52% of employees make more mistakes when they’re stressed, while 43% are more error-prone when tired 58% have sent an email to the wrong person at work and 1 in 5 companies lost customers after an employee sent a misdirected email  Read on to learn why this matters. You can also register for our webinar on August 19 here. We’ll be exploring key findings from the report with Jeff Hancock. You’ll walk away with a better understanding of how hacker’s are manipulating employees and what you can do to stop them. What mistakes are people making?  The majority of our survey respondents said they had sent an email to the wrong person, with nearly one-fifth of these misdirected emails ending up in the wrong external person’s inbox.  Far from just red-faced embarrassment, this simple mistake has devastating consequences. Not only do companies face the wrath of data protection regulators for flouting the rules of regulations like GDPR, our research reveals that one in five companies lost customers as a result of a misdirected email, because the trust they once had with their clients was broken. What’s more, one in 10 workers said they lost their job.  !function(e,i,n,s){var t="InfogramEmbeds",d=e.getElementsByTagName("script")[0];if(window[t]&&window[t].initialized)window[t].process&&window[t].process();else if(!e.getElementById(n)){var o=e.createElement("script");o.async=1,o.id=n,o.src="https://e.infogram.com/js/dist/embed-loader-min.js",d.parentNode.insertBefore(o,d)}}(document,0,"infogram-async"); Another mistake was clicking on links in phishing emails, something a quarter of respondents (25%) said they had done at work. This figure was significantly higher in the Technology industry however, with 47% of workers in this sector saying they’d fallen for phishing scams. It goes to show that even the most cybersecurity savvy people can make mistakes.  Interestingly, men were twice as likely as women to fall for phishing scams. While researchers aren’t 100% sure as to why gender differences play a factor in phishing susceptibility, our report does show that demographics play a role in people’s cybersecurity behaviors at work.  What’s causing these mistakes to happen?  1. Younger employees are 5x more likely to make mistakes 50% aged 18-30 years olds said they had made such mistakes with security repercussions for themselves or their organization. Just 10% of workers over 51 said the same.  This disparity, our report suggests, is not because younger workers are more careless. Rather, it may be because younger workers are actually more aware that they have made a mistake and are also more willing to admit their errors. For older generations, Professor Hancock explains, self-presentation and respect in the workplace are hugely important. They may be more reluctant to admit they’ve made a mistake because they feel ashamed due to preconceived notions about their generations and technology. Businesses, therefore, need to not only acknowledge how age affects cybersecurity behaviors but also find ways to deshame the reporting of mistakes in their organization. 2. 93% of employees are stressed and tired Employees told us they make more mistakes at work when they are stressed (52%), tired (43%), distracted (41%) and working quickly (36%).  This is concerning when you consider that an overwhelming 93% of employees surveyed said they were either tired or stressed at some point during the working week. This isn’t helped by the fact that nearly two-thirds of employees feel chained to their desks, with 61% saying there is a culture of presenteeism in their organization that makes them work longer hours than they need to.  The Covid-19 pandemic has put people under huge amounts of stress and change. In light of the events of 2020, our findings call for businesses to empathize with people’s positions and understand the impact stress and working cultures have on cybersecurity.
3. 57% of employees are being driven to distraction 47% of employees surveyed cited distraction as a top reason for falling for a phishing scam, while two-fifths said they sent an email to the wrong person because they were distracted.  With over half of workers (57%) admitting they’re more distracted when working from home, the sudden shift to remote-working could open businesses up to even more risks caused by human error. It’s hardly surprising. We suddenly had to set-up offices in the homes we share with our young children, pets and our housemates. There’s a lot going on, and mistakes are likely to happen. 
4. 41% thought phishing emails were from someone they trusted Over two-fifths of people (43%) mistakenly clicked on phishing emails because they thought the request was legitimate, while 41% said the email appeared to have come from either a senior executive or a well-known brand.  Over the past few months, we’ve seen hackers impersonating well-known brands and trusted authorities in their phishing scams, taking advantage of people’s desire to seek guidance and information on the pandemic. Impersonating someone in a position of trust or authority is a common and effective tactic used by hackers in phishing campaigns. Why? Because they know how difficult or unlikely it is to ignore a request from someone you like, respect or report into.  Businesses need to protect their people from these phishing scams. Educate staff on the ways hackers could take advantage of their circumstances and invest in solutions that can detect the impersonations, when your distracted and overworked employees can’t. !function(e,i,n,s){var t="InfogramEmbeds",d=e.getElementsByTagName("script")[0];if(window[t]&&window[t].initialized)window[t].process&&window[t].process();else if(!e.getElementById(n)){var o=e.createElement("script");o.async=1,o.id=n,o.src="https://e.infogram.com/js/dist/embed-loader-min.js",d.parentNode.insertBefore(o,d)}}(document,0,"infogram-async"); But how can businesses prevent these mistakes from happening in the first place?  To successfully prevent mistakes from turning into serious security incidents, businesses have to take a more human approach.  It’s all too easy to place the blame of data breaches on people’s mistakes. But businesses have to remember that not every employee is an expert in cybersecurity. In fact, a third of our survey respondents (33%) said they rarely or never think about cybersecurity when at work. They are focused on getting the jobs they were hired to do, done. !function(e,i,n,s){var t="InfogramEmbeds",d=e.getElementsByTagName("script")[0];if(window[t]&&window[t].initialized)window[t].process&&window[t].process();else if(!e.getElementById(n)){var o=e.createElement("script");o.async=1,o.id=n,o.src="https://e.infogram.com/js/dist/embed-loader-min.js",d.parentNode.insertBefore(o,d)}}(document,0,"infogram-async"); Training and policies help. However, combining this with machine intelligent security solutions – like Tessian – that automatically alert individuals of potential threats in real-time is a much more powerful tool in preventing mistakes before they turn into breaches.  Alerting employees to the threat in-the-moment helps override impulsive and dangerous decision-making that could compromise cybersecurity. By using explainable machine learning, we arm employees with the information they need to apply conscious reasoning to their actions over email, making them think twice before doing something they might regret. 
And with greater visibility into the behaviors of your riskiest and most at-risk employees, your teams can tailor security training and policies to influence and improve staff’s cybersecurity behaviors. Only by protecting people and preventing their mistakes can you ensure data and systems remain secure, and help your people do their best work. Read the full Psychology of Human Error report here.
Human Layer Security
Tessian included in 2020 Forrester Now Tech: Report for Enterprise Email Security Providers
14 July 2020
We are thrilled to announce that Forrester Research has recognized Tessian as one of the vendors in the Now Tech: Enterprise Email Security Providers, Q3, 2020 report. Inclusion in this report is based on Forrester’s independent analysis of vendors’ capabilities and market presence and was created to help security leaders identify which solutions will provide the most value for their particular organization. Before we dive into why Tessian was recognized, let’s look at Forrester’s definition of Enterprise Email Security.
In order provide an overview of solutions, Forrester identifies four Enterprise Email Security Functionality Segments, including: Secure email gateway (SEG) Email infrastructure provider Cloud-native API-enabled email security (CAPES) Email authentication provider Tessian is recognized as one of the players among the cloud native API- enabled email security (CAPES) solutions. Importantly, this segment has high functionality in both email cloud integration and phishing protection. Why does this matter? Not only do phishing and social engineering attacks cause the majority of breaches today, but according to Forrester, rapid adoption of cloud email infrastructure like Microsoft O365 and Google G Suite is forcing enterprises to move away from traditional secure email gateways and on-premises hardware. Organizations now often use the native capabilities of their email infrastructure provider, then augment those protections with CAPES or cloud-based email filtering. Security pros know that despite best efforts, malicious emails will inevitably get through, so they need a layered approach that includes both prevention and response measures. It’s important to note that detecting and preventing threats isn’t enough. Forrester recommends that security professionals protect against email-bound security threats by empowering employees with phishing education and being prepared for the worst with incident response. Why was Tessian recognized? From our standpoint, it is because this is exactly what Tessian does. Tessian provides a layered approach to email security by seamlessly integrating with Microsoft O365 and Google G Suite email infrastructure providers, extending their native capabilities, and protecting against phishing attacks and other inbound and outbound threats. Tessian’s Key Features Tessian automatically safeguards against accidental data loss, data exfiltration, and insider threats, in addition to automatically defending against advanced inbound threats like business email compromise (BEC), spear phishing, and other targeted impersonation attacks. How? Powered by machine learning, Tessian – the world’s first Human Layer Security platform – turns an organization’s email data into their best defense against human error on email. Tessian is uniquely positioned to do both, offering organizations: In-situ real world phishing training with educational warnings. Tessian’s warnings come with simple, clear messages including precise reasons as to why an email was classified as unsafe. The educational warning not only alerts employees about unsafe emails, but also educates them in the moment. Think of it as training. But, instead of generic phishing simulations, employees learn from real phishing emails that land in their inbox.
Robust investigation and remediation tools. With email quarantine and post-delivery protection like bulk email removal, single-click blacklist, and clawback, it’s easier than ever for security teams to take action and move swiftly from investigation to remediation.
Automated threat intelligence. Tessian’s Human Layer Security Intelligence offers security leaders crystal clear visibility into their security threats, including their riskiest and most at-risk employees. This way, they can offer targeted training to reinforce policies and best practice before a security incident occurs.
Learn more about Tessian Tessian can be deployed within minutes and automatically starts preventing threats within 24 hours of deployment. Our solutions are trusted by world-leading businesses like Arm, Man Group, Evercore, and Schroders to protect their people on email. Book a demo to learn how Tessian can help secure your Microsoft O365, G Suite, MS Exchange email environments.  
Human Layer Security Spear Phishing
Must-Know Phishing Statistics: Updated 2020
By Maddie Rosenthal
10 July 2020
Phishing attacks aren’t a new threat. In fact, these scams have been circulating since the mid-’90s. But, over time, they’ve become more and more sophisticated, have targeted larger numbers of people, and have caused more harm to both individuals and organizations. That means that this year – despite a growing number of vendors offering anti-phishing solutions – phishing is a bigger problem than ever. The problem is so big, in fact, that it’s hard to keep up with the latest facts and figures. That’s why we’ve put together this article. We’ve rounded up the latest phishing statistics, including: The frequency of phishing attacks The tactics employed by hackers The data that’s compromised by breaches The cost of a breach The most targeted industries The most impersonated brands  Looking for something more visual? Check out this infographic with key statistics.
If you’re familiar with phishing, spear phishing, and other forms of social engineering attacks, skip straight to the first category of 2020 phishing statistics. If not, we’ve pulled together some of our favorite resources that you can check out first to learn more about this hard-to-detect security threat.  How to Identify and Prevent Phishing Attacks What is Spear Phishing? Spear Phishing Demystified: The Terms You Need to Know Phishing vs. Spear Phishing: Differences and Defense Strategies How to Catch a Phish: A Closer Look at Email Impersonation CEO Fraud Email Attacks: How to Recognize & Block Emails that Impersonate Executives Business Email Compromise: What it is and How it Happens Whaling Attacks: Examples and Prevention Strategies  The frequency of phishing attacks According to Verizon’s 2020 Data Breach Investigations Report (DBIR), 22% of breaches in 2019 involved phishing. While this is down 6.6% from the previous year, it’s still the “threat action variety” most likely to cause a breach.  The frequency of attacks varies industry-by-industry (click here to jump to key statistics about the most phished). But 88% of organizations around the world experienced spear phishing attempts in 2019. Another 86% experienced business email compromise (BEC) attempts.  But, there’s a difference between an attempt and a successful attack. 65% of organizations in the United States experienced a successful phishing attack. This is 10% higher than the global average.  The tactics employed by hackers 96% of phishing attacks arrive by email. Another 3% are carried out through malicious websites and just 1% via phone. When it’s done over the telephone, we call it vishing and when it’s done via text message, we call it smishing. According to Symantec’s 2019 Internet Security Threat Report (ISTR), the top five subject lines for business email compromise (BEC) attacks: Urgent Request Important Payment Attention Hackers are relying more and more heavily on the credentials they’ve stolen via phishing attacks to access sensitive systems and data. That’s one reason why breaches involving malware have decreased by over 40%.
According to Sonic Wall’s 2020 Cyber Threat report, in 2019, PDFs and Microsoft Office files were the delivery vehicles of choice for today’s cybercriminals. Why? Because these files are universally trusted in the modern workplace.  When it comes to targeted attacks, 65% of active groups relied on spear phishing as the primary infection vector. This is followed by watering hole websites (23%), trojanized software updates (5%), web server exploits (2%), and data storage devices (1%).  The data that’s compromised by breaches The top five “types” of data that are compromised in a phishing attack are: Credentials (passwords, usernames, pin numbers) Personal data (name, address, email address) Internal data (sales projections, product roadmaps)  Medical (treatment information, insurance claims) Bank (account numbers, credit card information) While instances of financially-motivated social engineering incidents have more than doubled since 2015, this isn’t a driver for targeted attacks. Just 6% of targeted attacks are motivated by financial incentives, while 96% are motivated by intelligence gathering. The other 10% are simply trying to cause chaos and disruption. While we’ve already discussed credential theft, malware, and financial motivations, the consequences and impact vary. According to one report: Nearly 60% of organizations lose data Nearly 50% of organizations  have credentials or accounts compromised Nearly 50% of organizations are infected with ransomware Nearly 40% of organizations are infected with malware Nearly 35% of organizations experience financial losses
The cost of a breach According to IBM’s Cost of a Data Breach Report, the average cost per compromised record has steadily increased over the last three years. In 2019, the cost was $150. For some context, 5.2 million records were stolen in Marriott’s most recent breach. That means the cost of the breach could amount to $780 million. But, the average breach costs organizations $3.92 million. This number will generally be higher in larger organizations and lower in smaller organizations.  Losses from business email compromise (BEC) have skyrocketed over the last year. The FBI’s Internet Crime Report shows that in 2019, BEC scammers made nearly $1.8 billion last year. That’s over half of the total losses reported by organizations. This cost can be broken down into several different categories, including: Lost hours from employees Remediation Incident response Damaged reputation Lost intellectual property Direct monetary losses Compliance fines Lost revenue Legal fees Costs associated remediation generally account for the largest chunk of the total.  Importantly, these costs can be mitigated by cybersecurity policies, procedures, technology, and training. Artificial Intelligence platforms can save organizations $8.97 per record.  The most targeted industires While the Manufacturing industry saw the most breaches from social attacks (followed by Healthcare and then Professional services), employees working in Wholesale Trade are the most frequently targeted by phishing attacks, with 1 in every 22 users being targeted by a phishing email last year.   According to a different data set, the most phished industries vary by company size. Nonetheless, it’s clear Manufacturing and Healthcare are among the highest risk industries. The industries most at risk in companies with 1-249 employees are: Healthcare & Pharmaceuticals Education Manufacturing The industries most at risk in companies with 250-999 employees are: Construction Healthcare & Pharmaceuticals Business Services The industries most at risk in companies with 1,000+ employees are: Technology Healthcare & Pharmaceuticals Manufacturing The most impersonated brands Earlier this year, Check Point released its list of the most impersonated brands. These vary based on whether the attempt was via email or mobile, but the most impersonated brands overall for Q1 2020 were: Apple Netflix Yahoo WhatsApp PayPal Chase Facebook Microsoft eBay Amazon The common factor between all of these consumer brands? They’re trusted and frequently communicate with their customers via email. Whether we’re asked to confirm credit card details, our home address, or our password, we often think nothing of it and willingly hand over this sensitive information.
What can individuals and organizations do to prevent being targeted by phishing attacks? While you can’t stop hackers from sending phishing or spear phishing emails, you can make sure you (and your employees) are prepared if and when one is received. You should start with training. Educate employees about the key characteristics of a phishing email and remind them to be scrupulous and inspect emails, attachments, and links before taking any further action. Review the email address of senders and look out for impersonations of trusted brands or people (Check out our blog CEO Fraud Email Attacks: How to Recognize & Block Emails that Impersonate Executives for more information.) Always inspect URLs in emails for legitimacy by hovering over them before clicking Beware of URL redirects and pay attention to subtle differences in website content Genuine brands and professionals generally won’t ask you to reply divulging sensitive personal information. If you’ve been prompted to, investigate and contact the brand or person directly, rather than hitting reply We’ve created several resources to help employees identify phishing attacks. You can download a shareable PDF with examples of phishing emails and tips at the bottom of this blog: Coronavirus and Cybersecurity: How to Stay Safe From Phishing Attacks. But, humans shouldn’t be the last line of defense. That’s why organizations need to invest in technology and other solutions to prevent successful phishing attacks. But, given the frequency of attacks year-on-year, it’s clear that spam filters, antivirus software, and other legacy security solutions aren’t enough. That’s where Tessian comes in. By learning from historical email data, Tessian’s machine learning algorithms can understand specific user relationships and the context behind each email. This allows Tessian Defender to not only detect, but also prevent a wide range of impersonations, spanning more obvious, payload-based attacks to subtle, social-engineered ones. To learn more about how tools like Tessian Defender can prevent spear phishing attacks, speak to one of our experts and request a demo today.
Compliance Data Loss Prevention Human Layer Security
At a Glance: Data Loss Prevention in Healthcare
By Maddie Rosenthal
30 June 2020
Data Loss Prevention (DLP) is a priority for organizations across all sectors, but especially for those in Healthcare. Why? To start, they process and hold incredible amounts of personal and medical data and they must comply with strict data privacy laws like HIPAA and HITECH.  Healthcare also has the highest costs associated with data breaches – 65% higher than the average across all industries – and has for nine years running.  But, in order to remain compliant and, more importantly, to prevent data loss incidents and breaches, security leaders must have visibility over data movement. The question is: Do they? According to our latest research report, The State of Data Loss Prevention 2020, not yet. How frequently are data loss incidents happening in Healthcare? Data loss incidents are happening up to 38x more frequently than IT leaders currently estimate.  Tessian platform data shows that in organizations with 1,000 employees, 800 emails are sent to the wrong person every year. Likewise, in organizations of the same size, 27,500 emails containing company data are sent to personal accounts. These numbers are significantly higher than IT leaders expected.
But, what about in Healthcare specifically? We found that: Over half (51%) of employees working in Healthcare admit to sending company data to personal email accounts 41% of employees working in Healthcare say they’ve sent an email to the wrong person 35% employees working in Healthcare have downloaded, saved, or sent work-related documents to personal accounts before leaving or after being dismissed from a job Download the data sheet for more stats, including graphs. This only covers outbound email security. Hospitals are also frequently targeted by ransomware and phishing attacks and Healthcare is the industry most likely to experience an incident involving employee misuse of access privileges.  Worse still, new remote-working structures are only making DLP more challenging.
Healthcare professionals feel less secure outside of the office  While over the last several months workforces around the world have suddenly transitioned from office-to-home, this isn’t a fleeting change. In fact, bolstered by digital solutions and streamlined virtual services, we can expect to see the global healthcare market grow exponentially over the next several years.  While this is great news in terms of general welfare, we can’t ignore the impact this might have on information security.   Half of employees working in Healthcare feel less secure outside of their normal office environment and 42% say they’re less likely to follow safe data practices when working remotely.   Why? Most employees surveyed said it was because IT isn’t watching, they’re distracted, and they’re not working on their normal devices. But, we can’t blame employees. After all, they’re just trying to do their jobs and cybersecurity isn’t top-of-mind, especially during a global pandemic. Perhaps that’s why over half (57%) say they’ll find a workaround if security software or policies make it difficult or prevent them from doing their job.  That’s why it’s so important that security leaders make the most secure path the path of least resistance. How can security leaders in Healthcare help protect employees and data? There are thousands of products on the market designed to detect and prevent data incidents and breaches and organizations are spending more than ever (up from $1.4 million to $13 million) to protect their systems and data.  But something’s wrong.  We’ve seen a 67% increase in the volume of breaches over the last five years and, as we’ve explored already, security leaders still don’t have visibility over risky and at-risk employees. So, what solutions are security, IT, and compliance leaders relying on? According to our research, most are relying on security training. And, it makes sense. Security awareness training confronts the crux of data loss by educating employees on best practice, company policies, and industry regulation. But, how effective is training, and can it influence and actually change human behavior for the long-term? Not on its own. Despite having training more frequently than most industries, Healthcare remains among the most likely to suffer a breach. The fact is, people break the rules and make mistakes. To err is human! That’s why security leaders have to bolster training and reinforce policies with tech that understands human behavior. How does Tessian prevent data loss on email? Tessian uses machine learning to address the problem of accidental or deliberate data loss. How? By analyzing email data to understand how people work and communicate.  This enables Tessian Guardian to look at email communications and determine in real-time if a particular email looks like they’re about to be sent to the wrong person. Tessian Enforcer, meanwhile, can identify when sensitive data is about to be sent to an unsafe place outside an organization’s email network. 
Interested in learning more about how Tessian can help prevent data loss in your organization? You can read some of our customer stories here or book a demo. You can also download this data sheet to share key statistics with others.
Data Loss Prevention Human Layer Security Spear Phishing
Research Shows Employees Are Less Likely To Follow Safe Data Practices At Home
26 June 2020
While organizations may have struggled initially to get their employees set-up to work securely outside of their normal office environment, by now, most have introduced new software, policies, and procedures to accommodate their new distributed teams.  Problem solved, right? Not quite. While 91% of IT leaders trust their employees to follow security best practice while out of the office, almost half (48%) of employees say they’re less likely to follow safe data practices when working remotely and a further 52% say they feel as though they can get away with riskier behavior when working from home.   In our latest research report, The State of Data Loss Prevention 2020, we explore the reasons why.  Key findings include: 50% of employees say they’re less likely to follow safe data practices when working from home because they’re not working on their usual devices. 48% of employees say they’re less likely to follow safe data practices when working from home because they feel as though they’re not being watched by their IT teams. 47% of employees say they’re less likely to follow safe data practices when working from home because they’re distracted. Read on to learn why this matters and what you can do to promote safer security practices in your organization.
Why is data loss prevention (DLP) harder when workforces are remote? 84% of IT leaders say that DLP is more challenging when employees are working remotely. It makes sense. One or two offices have become thousands of virtual offices which means maintaining visibility over data flow is more difficult than ever.  People are relying more heavily on email and other communication tools and are therefore sending data more frequently. Security and IT teams have limited control over how employees handle physical data (for example how they print, store, and dispose of documents). And there’s been a spike in inbound attacks like phishing since the outbreak of COVID-19.  This is to say that organizations are more vulnerable across email security, physical security, and network security. While there are tools to detect and prevent incidents, data loss prevention ultimately relies on people. After all, it’s people who control our systems and data. They’re the gatekeepers of an organization’s most sensitive information. But, despite IT leaders’ confidence and optimism (91% say they trust their employees to follow security best practice while out of the office), nearly half (48%) of employees say they’re less likely to.   !function(e,t,s,i){var n="InfogramEmbeds",o=e.getElementsByTagName("script"),d=o[0],r=/^http:/.test(e.location)?"http:":"https:";if(/^\/{2}/.test(i)&&(i=r+i),window[n]&&window[n].initialized)window[n].process&&window[n].process();else if(!e.getElementById(s)){var a=e.createElement("script");a.async=1,a.id=s,a.src=i,d.parentNode.insertBefore(a,d)}}(document,0,"infogram-async","//e.infogram.com/js/dist/embed-loader-min.js"); The question is: Why?
1. 50% of employees say they’re less likely to follow safe data practices when working from home because they’re not working on their usual devices. Most of us have dedicated workstations in the office and have grown accustomed to certain equipment. Whether it’s multiple monitors, a desktop, a keyboard, a printer, or a trackpad, we’re comfortable working on our usual devices.  At home, not all of us are so lucky. And, while security and IT teams around the world have worked hard to get their teams set-up at home, there have been delays and even cancellations in global supply chains providing laptops, cell phones, and other technology.  What to do about it: If you’re unable to get your employees the equipment they need, you should consider BYOD policies. We’ve covered the benefits, potential security risks, and tips for employers and employees in this blog: Remote Worker’s Guide To: BYOD Policies.  You can also implement training sessions for new devices to ensure your employees feel comfortable using them. (Be sure to also train your employees on any new applications or software!) 2. 48% of employees say they’re less likely to follow safe data practices when working from home because they feel as though they’re not being watched by their IT teams. While we can say with confidence that the average employee wants to do the right thing when it comes to security, it’s important to remember that first and foremost, they want to get their jobs done. And, if security policies, procedures, or software makes that difficult or prevents them from doing it all together, they’ll find a workaround.  In fact, 54% of employees say exactly that. !function(e,t,s,i){var n="InfogramEmbeds",o=e.getElementsByTagName("script"),d=o[0],r=/^http:/.test(e.location)?"http:":"https:";if(/^\/{2}/.test(i)&&(i=r+i),window[n]&&window[n].initialized)window[n].process&&window[n].process();else if(!e.getElementById(s)){var a=e.createElement("script");a.async=1,a.id=s,a.src=i,d.parentNode.insertBefore(a,d)}}(document,0,"infogram-async","//e.infogram.com/js/dist/embed-loader-min.js"); In an office environment, it’s easier for IT and security teams to maintain visibility of employee behavior. They can see if someone isn’t locking their laptop. They can see if someone is using a USB stick when they shouldn’t. They can see if someone has skipped security training. But, IT and security teams aren’t just there to enforce rules. They’re also there to educate employees and build a strong security culture. That’s harder with distributed workforces.
What to do about it: Communicate, communicate, communicate. Whether it’s sharing information about new threats, reminding employees of security do’s and don’ts, or offering an individual or team kudos for secure behavior, you need to consistently remind your team not only that you’re there, but that you’re there to help. But, you shouldn’t over-communicate. That means you should ensure there’s one point of contact (or source of truth) who shares updates at a regular, defined time and cadence as opposed to different people sharing updates as and when they happen. 3. 47% of employees say they’re less likely to follow safe data practices when working from home because they’re distracted. We’re not just working from home. We’re working from home during a crisis. It’s essential that security and business leaders keep this in mind. While most of us are trying to conduct “business as usual”, most of us are also dealing with a range of challenges. Parents have suddenly taken on the roles of teachers. Living rooms have been turned into makeshift coworking spaces for partners and roommates. Employees are navigating mass lay-offs and furlough schemes. Current social and political unrest is triggering emotional stress and anxiety. The bottom line: There’s a lot going on.  That means people are more likely to make mistakes. They may send an email to the wrong person. They may misconfigure a firewall. They may make sensitive documents public instead of private on a Google Drive. While these are “small” mishaps, they can have big consequences. In fact, each of the above incidents has caused a data breach.   What to do about it: Start by being empathetic and compassionate. Take the mental wellbeing of your employees seriously and give them the tools, resources, and support they need to thrive. We’ve put together some tips in this blog: 3 Practical Ways to Support Mental Wellbeing in the Workplace. Beyond that, though, you have to implement solutions that prevent human error. Why? Because it’s simply not fair (or realistic) to rely on people to do the right thing 100% of the time.  Tessian does this across three solutions: Tessian Enforcer detects and prevents data exfiltration attempts Tessian Guardian detects and prevents misdirected emails Tessian Defender detects and prevents spear phishing attacks Curious how frequently these incidents are happening in your organization? Click here for a free threat report. How does Tessian support employees and security leaders working remotely? Tessian turns an organization’s email data into its best defense against inbound and outbound email security threats. Powered by machine learning, our Human Layer Security technology understands evolvong human behavior and relationships, enabling it to automatically detect and prevent anomalous and dangerous activity. 
Best of all: It works silently in the background across devices. That means employees can do their job without security getting in the way and they’re protected, wherever they work. Tessian bolsters training, reinforces policies and procedures, and enables employees to do their best work.  And, with Human Layer Security Intelligence, security, IT, and compliance leaders get clear visibility into employee behavior with visualized insights and automated threat intelligence. That means detecting and preventing human error is easier than ever and organizations can continuously lower the risks of misdirected emails, data exfiltration, and impersonation attacks.
To learn more about Tessian’s solutions, book a demo. And, for more insights around data loss on email (including the most and least effective solutions) read the report: The State of Data Loss Prevention 2020.
Data Loss Prevention Human Layer Security Spear Phishing
Tessian Human Layer Security Summit: Your Questions, Answered
24 June 2020
Last week, Tessian hosted the world’s first Virtual Human Layer Security Summit and, over the course of three hours, thought leaders from some of the world’s leading organizations shared insights and advice around business continuity, cybersecurity, and what the future looks like. Throughout the Summit, we asked the audience to submit questions but, with over 1,000 people tuning in, we weren’t able to address them all. Better late than never! Here are answers to some of your most pressing questions.  Did you miss the Human Layer Security Summit? You can view each session in the playlist below and you can read the key learnings from the day here: 13 Things We Learned at Tessian Virtual Human Layer Security Summit. You can also sign-up for our newsletter to ensure you’re the first to hear about upcoming events and other relevant industry and company news. 1. What is Human Layer Security? Human Layer Security (HLS) a new category of technology that secures all human-digital interactions in the workplace. Instead of protecting networks or devices, Human Layer Security protects people (employees, contractors, customers, suppliers). Why? Because people control our most sensitive systems and data. They’re the gatekeepers of information.  Tessian’s Human Layer Security technology understands human behavior and relationships, enabling it to detect and prevent dangerous activity like data exfiltration, accidental data loss, and spear phishing attacks. Importantly, Tessian’s technology learns and adapts to how people work without getting in the way or impeding productivity. You can learn more about this new category of security in our Ultimate Guide to Human Layer Security.  2. What are some of the key risk indicators used to measure human fallibility?  In the context of email security, Tessian looks at three key human vulnerabilities:  People break the rules  People make mistakes People can be easily tricked While risk indicators vary based on the vulnerability, monitoring data handling (both physical and digital) and assessing employee’s understanding of cybersecurity best practices should help you understand how risky or at-risk a particular employee is. Read: Insider Threat Indicators: 11 Ways to Recognize an Insider Threat  For example, if someone in your HR department consistently falls for phishing scams during simulations, they’re at risk of falling for one in real-life. Likewise, if someone in your finance department doesn’t change their passwords as requested, they may be more likely to break other security rules. But, keeping track of every employee and their attitudes towards security is nearly impossible, especially in large companies. That’s why solutions like Tessian are essential.  With Tessian Human Layer Security Intelligence, you’ll be able to see at a glance which employees are breaking the rules, making mistakes, and getting hacked. You’ll also be able to review historical data to see how behaviors have changed (for better or worse) in order to correct or reward individuals.  Want to learn more about how Tessian Human Layer Security Intelligence helps security teams maintain visibility of the Human Layer risks in their organizations? Read our blog, which outlines use cases, benefits, and more.
3. In the context of remote-working, how does decreased focus impact security? Over the last several months, we’ve been talking a lot about remote-working and how these new set-ups can impact cybersecurity. And, while there are a lot of technical challenges to overcome – from setting up VPNs to onboarding and offboarding employees while out of the office – we can’t ignore the more human challenges. Tessian actually took a closer look at these challenges in our latest research report, The State of Data Loss Prevention 2020, and found that 91% of employees are less likely to follow safe security practices when working from home. But why?  47% said it’s because they’re distracted. And, it makes sense. When working from home, people have other responsibilities like childcare, roommates and, more often than note, they don’t have dedicated workstations like they do in their normal office environment. That means it’s easier to make mistakes. This isn’t trivial. One misdirected email could cause a data breach. It only takes one click of a mouse.  4. Does Tessian believe that employees are always trying to “get away” with something?  The short answer: absolutely not. We believe that the average employee is just trying to do their job and, if you give people the opportunity to make smart security decisions, they will. But, too often, security policies, procedures, and tech get in the way. And that’s where you run into problems.  51% of employees say security tools or software impede their productivity and a further 54% say they’ll find a workaround if security software or policies prevent them from doing their job. So, what do you do? Find a better way! Make the easiest path the most secure path.  This is a part of Tessian’s ethos. That’s why our solutions work silently in the background, have low flag rates for false positives, and reinforce security policies with contextual warnings.   5. What are some effective ways to change human behavior?  Training, a strong security culture, and tech. Importantly, you have to have all three. You have to first educate employees on why security matters for the larger organization and then explain how individual behaviors can impact its overall security posture. Of course, one training session isn’t enough to make the message stick. Security awareness training should be ongoing.  In fact, security should be baked into the overall business. That way, you create a strong security culture (which should start from the top-down) that really values and rewards secure behavior. But, even reinforcing security best practices isn’t enough. (Read our report: Why the Threat of Phishing Can’t be ‘Trained Away’.) To err is human.  Whether accidental or malicious, data loss incidents happen – even with regular training – which means your people shouldn’t be the last line of defense. Tech should be. Ideally, that tech will bolster training by reinforcing policies and procedures.  Tessian does this via contextual warnings that empower the employee to make his or her own decision, while also giving security teams full oversight.
6. How can you teach people outside of the cybersecurity team how to spot phishing emails and other social engineering attacks?  As we’ve said, the average employee just wants to do their job. They don’t want to be a security expert. That’s why it’s so important to teach people about security risks in terms they understand and care about. We’ve found that one of the best ways to teach employees how to spot phishing emails is to use consumer examples. For example, stimulus check scams, Tax Day scams, and Census scams.  Once you have several examples, make sure you point out what’s suspicious about the email and what to do if and when an employee receives one. If you work in a highly-targeted industry, make sure you reinforce frequent training with posters, PDFs, and other resources. We put together a guide – including examples – for COVID-19 attacks, which you can download at the bottom of this blog: Coronavirus and Cybersecurity: how to Stay Safe From Phishing Attacks. Feel free to share it with your employees!  7. What is your advice for a Cybersecurity Master’s student looking to explore the job sector? There is no right (or wrong) way to break into the industry. Cybersecurity is incredibly diverse and no one job, company, or project is the same. While you’re in school, get as much work experience as you can to find out what really ignites your passion. But, don’t take our word for it! Check out the profiles of over a dozen cybersecurity professionals on our blog. Or, read our report, Opportunity in Cybersecurity 2020, for an overview of the industry and what it has to offer new entrants.  Oh, and be sure to check out our open roles, too. Do you have more questions about Tessian or cybersecurity? Email [email protected] and we’ll get back to you. You can also book a demo to see how Tessian’s solutions can help prevent data loss incidents in your organization.
Human Layer Security
How to Adapt: 7 Tips from Upwork’s Former CEO
By Maddie Rosenthal
22 June 2020
In case you missed it, Tessian hosted the world’s first Virtual Human Layer Security Summit on June 18. While the majority of presentations, panel discussions, and fireside chats were focused specifically on how the sudden transition from office to home impacts cybersecurity, a few speakers touched on the new world of work more broadly. One of those speakers was Stephane Kasriel, Former CEO of Upwork. For context, Upwork has maintained a hybrid remote-working structure across 500 cities for 20 years. It’s a part of the company’s DNA. The point? He’s in a better position than most to offer advice on how to adapt and overcome the challenges that come with distributed workforces. While you can watch his interview with Tessian Co-founder and CEO Tim Sadler below, we’ve summarized his top 7 tips. 
1. Lead with empathy. The Golden Rule. Above all else, Stephane recommends leaders treat others the way they want to be treated. While it may seem obvious, it’s an excellent reminder, especially now as our employees are grappling with so much fear, anxiety, and stress around the pandemic and other triggering social and political issues. Put yourself in their shoes and identify the tools, resources, and support they need to thrive. 
2. Err on the side of over-communication. Let’s face it, communicating is often easier in-person. That’s why it’s so important we over-communicate when working remotely.  How? Repeat yourself, touch base frequently over Zoom or Slack, share minutes post-meeting, schedule frequent catch-ups with people outside of your immediate team, and never assume people know what you’re thinking.  3. Take advantage of a global talent pool. One of the most compelling arguments in favor of remote-working is the diverse talent pool recruiters suddenly have access to. Whereas traditionally, we’re forced to employ people who live near offices or headquarters, remote-working structures allow organizations to find people who are truly passionate about their work and who are aligned with company values.  Importantly, this isn’t just a benefit for employers. It’s a huge bonus for employees, too. Many of us opt to live in major cities because, well, that’s where the jobs are. If given the choice, we’d forgo higher-than-average costs of living and relocate to work online and out of the office. Win-win! 4. Be considerate of time zones and working hours. Whether your entire team is based in the same region or you have employees dotted across continents, business and security leaders must be considerate of time zones and working hours.  We simply can’t expect people to be available and online 24 (or even 12!) hours a day, especially now when people are working hard to balance the needs of children, roommates, partners, and even parents.  That means switching from a very synchronous model where everybody’s online at the same time to something that’s more asynchronous. Take advantage of tools like Loom, encourage employees to use email, Slack, and other channels, and implement sign-off processes that are smooth, regardless of where and when people are working.  Looking for more collaboration tools? Check out this blog: 11 Tools to Help You Stay Secure and Productive While Working Remotely. 5. Measure success based on facts specific to your organization, not headline statistics. Most of us have read at least one headline around how employee productivity is lower when they’re working from home. If you ask Stephane, this simply isn’t true. At least not in Upwork’s case. “There is no data that shows that worker productivity goes down when people are working remotely. In fact, there’s tons of data that shows the opposite,” he said. Remote working doesn’t just improve productivity. It boosts retention. Stephane says that people who work remotely stay with the company twice as long as the people who are based in the HQ locale The bottom line: what works for some may not work for others, and vice versa. Measure success within your own organization to see what works for you and your people, not for everyone else. 6. Ask for, listen to, and document feedback. It takes a village to be successful and diverse opinions are needed for businesses to thrive.  Ask your employees how they feel about company culture, policies, procedures, and their workloads and heed their advice. While you may not be able to action all of their feedback, ensuring that they feel heard will help bolster a sense of community. At Tessian, we use Peakon to track and document employee satisfaction. What do you use? 7. Stay agile. The outbreak of COVID-19 has catapulted us into the future.
Adopt new technologies. Embrace new ways of working. Lean on peers and professional networks for advice.  Fortunately, there are plenty of trailblazers who have done some of the hard work for us. Upwork, of course, is one and they’ve put together an incredible content hub for business leaders with advice around building and managing remote teams.  Looking for more resources? Tessian has also created content hub with advice for security, IT, and compliance leaders. This includes information about BYOD policies, Data Loss Prevention (DLP), and how to spot COVID-themed phishing attacks. Check it out!
Data Loss Prevention Human Layer Security
Insider Threat Statistics: Updated 2020
By Maddie Rosenthal
19 June 2020
Over the last two years, there’s been a 47% increase in the frequency of incidents involving Insider Threats. This includes malicious data exfiltration and accidental data loss. Why does this matter? Because these incidents cost organizations millions, are leading to breaches that expose sensitive customer, client, and company data, and are notoriously hard to prevent. In this article, we’ll explore how often these incidents (with different methods and motives)  are happening, the financial  impact these incidents have on larger organizations, and the effectiveness of different preventive measures.  But first: What is an Insider Threat?
If you’re looking for more background on Insider Threats, we have several resources you can read first: What is an Insider Threat? Insider Threat Definition, Examples, and Solutions Insider Threat Indicators: 11 Ways to Recognize an Insider Threat Insider Threats: Types and Real-World Examples You can also download an infographic with the key statistics from this article. Click here. How frequently are different Insider Threat incidents happening? As we’ve said, incidents involving Insider Threats have increased by 47% since 2018. But the frequency of incidents varies industry-by-industry. Which industries are the most affected overall? Verizon’s 2020 Breach Investigations Report offers a comprehensive overview of different incidents in different industries, with a focus on patterns, actions, and assets.  They found that: The Healthcare and Manufacturing industries experience the most incidents involving  employees misusing their access privileges The Public Sector and Healthcare suffer the most from lost or stolen assets  Healthcare and Finance see the most “miscellaneous errors” (for example misdirected emails !function(e,t,s,i){var n="InfogramEmbeds",o=e.getElementsByTagName("script"),d=o[0],r=/^http:/.test(e.location)?"http:":"https:";if(/^\/{2}/.test(i)&&(i=r+i),window[n]&&window[n].initialized)window[n].process&&window[n].process();else if(!e.getElementById(s)){var a=e.createElement("script");a.async=1,a.id=s,a.src=i,d.parentNode.insertBefore(a,d)}}(document,0,"infogram-async","//e.infogram.com/js/dist/embed-loader-min.js");
Who’s the Insider? There are several different types of Insider Threats and the “who and why” behind these incidents can vary.  According to one study: Negligent Insiders are the most common and account for 62% of all incidents.  Negligent Insiders who have their credentials stolen account for 25% of all incidents Malicious Insiders are responsible for 14% of all incidents !function(e,t,s,i){var n="InfogramEmbeds",o=e.getElementsByTagName("script"),d=o[0],r=/^http:/.test(e.location)?"http:":"https:";if(/^\/{2}/.test(i)&&(i=r+i),window[n]&&window[n].initialized)window[n].process&&window[n].process();else if(!e.getElementById(s)){var a=e.createElement("script");a.async=1,a.id=s,a.src=i,d.parentNode.insertBefore(a,d)}}(document,0,"infogram-async","//e.infogram.com/js/dist/embed-loader-min.js"); Looking at Tessian’s own platform data, Negligent Insiders may be responsible for even more incidents than most expected. On average, 800 emails are sent to the wrong person every year in companies with 1,000 employees. This is 1.6x more than IT leaders estimate.  !function(e,t,s,i){var n="InfogramEmbeds",o=e.getElementsByTagName("script"),d=o[0],r=/^http:/.test(e.location)?"http:":"https:";if(/^\/{2}/.test(i)&&(i=r+i),window[n]&&window[n].initialized)window[n].process&&window[n].process();else if(!e.getElementById(s)){var a=e.createElement("script");a.async=1,a.id=s,a.src=i,d.parentNode.insertBefore(a,d)}}(document,0,"infogram-async","//e.infogram.com/js/dist/embed-loader-min.js"); Why did they do it? When it comes to the “why”, Insiders – specifically Malicious Insiders – are often motivated by money, a competitive edge, or revenge. But, according to one report, there is a range of reasons malicious Insiders act. Some just do it for fun.  !function(e,t,s,i){var n="InfogramEmbeds",o=e.getElementsByTagName("script"),d=o[0],r=/^http:/.test(e.location)?"http:":"https:";if(/^\/{2}/.test(i)&&(i=r+i),window[n]&&window[n].initialized)window[n].process&&window[n].process();else if(!e.getElementById(s)){var a=e.createElement("script");a.async=1,a.id=s,a.src=i,d.parentNode.insertBefore(a,d)}}(document,0,"infogram-async","//e.infogram.com/js/dist/embed-loader-min.js"); But, we don’t always know exactly “why”.  For example, Tessian’s own survey data shows that 45% of employees download, save, send, or otherwise exfiltrate work-related documents before leaving a job or after being dismissed.  While we may be able to infer that they’re taking spreadsheets, contracts, or other documents to impress a future or potential employer, we can’t know for certain.  It’s worth noting, though, that this number is highest in competitive industries like Financial Services and Business, Consulting, & Management, which supports our theory.  !function(e,t,s,i){var n="InfogramEmbeds",o=e.getElementsByTagName("script"),d=o[0],r=/^http:/.test(e.location)?"http:":"https:";if(/^\/{2}/.test(i)&&(i=r+i),window[n]&&window[n].initialized)window[n].process&&window[n].process();else if(!e.getElementById(s)){var a=e.createElement("script");a.async=1,a.id=s,a.src=i,d.parentNode.insertBefore(a,d)}}(document,0,"infogram-async","//e.infogram.com/js/dist/embed-loader-min.js"); How much do incidents involving Insider Threats cost?  The cost of Insider Threat incidents varies based on the type of incident, with incidents involving stolen credentials causing the most financial damage. But, across the board, the cost has been steadily rising. !function(e,t,s,i){var n="InfogramEmbeds",o=e.getElementsByTagName("script"),d=o[0],r=/^http:/.test(e.location)?"http:":"https:";if(/^\/{2}/.test(i)&&(i=r+i),window[n]&&window[n].initialized)window[n].process&&window[n].process();else if(!e.getElementById(s)){var a=e.createElement("script");a.async=1,a.id=s,a.src=i,d.parentNode.insertBefore(a,d)}}(document,0,"infogram-async","//e.infogram.com/js/dist/embed-loader-min.js"); Likewise, there are regional differences in the cost of Insider Threats, with incidents in North America costing the most and almost twice as much as those in Asia-Pacific. !function(e,t,s,i){var n="InfogramEmbeds",o=e.getElementsByTagName("script"),d=o[0],r=/^http:/.test(e.location)?"http:":"https:";if(/^\/{2}/.test(i)&&(i=r+i),window[n]&&window[n].initialized)window[n].process&&window[n].process();else if(!e.getElementById(s)){var a=e.createElement("script");a.async=1,a.id=s,a.src=i,d.parentNode.insertBefore(a,d)}}(document,0,"infogram-async","//e.infogram.com/js/dist/embed-loader-min.js"); But, overall, the average global cost has increased 31% over the last 2 years, from $8.76 million in 2018 to $11.45 in 2020 and the largest chunk goes towards containment, remediation, incident response, and investigation. !function(e,t,s,i){var n="InfogramEmbeds",o=e.getElementsByTagName("script"),d=o[0],r=/^http:/.test(e.location)?"http:":"https:";if(/^\/{2}/.test(i)&&(i=r+i),window[n]&&window[n].initialized)window[n].process&&window[n].process();else if(!e.getElementById(s)){var a=e.createElement("script");a.async=1,a.id=s,a.src=i,d.parentNode.insertBefore(a,d)}}(document,0,"infogram-async","//e.infogram.com/js/dist/embed-loader-min.js"); But, what about prevention? How effective are preventative measures? As the frequency of Insider Threat incidents continues to increase, so does investment in cybersecurity. But, what solutions are available and which solutions do security, IT, and compliance leaders trust to detect and prevent data loss within their organizations? According to Tessian’s latest report, The State of Data Loss Prevention 2020, most rely on security awareness training, followed by following company policies/procedures, and machine learning/intelligent automation. But, incidents actually happen more frequently in organizations that offer training the most often and, while the majority of employees say they understand company policies and procedures, comprehension doesn’t help prevent malicious behavior. !function(e,t,s,i){var n="InfogramEmbeds",o=e.getElementsByTagName("script"),d=o[0],r=/^http:/.test(e.location)?"http:":"https:";if(/^\/{2}/.test(i)&&(i=r+i),window[n]&&window[n].initialized)window[n].process&&window[n].process();else if(!e.getElementById(s)){var a=e.createElement("script");a.async=1,a.id=s,a.src=i,d.parentNode.insertBefore(a,d)}}(document,0,"infogram-async","//e.infogram.com/js/dist/embed-loader-min.js"); That’s why many organizations rely on rule-based solutions. But, those often fall short.  Not only are they admin-intensive for security teams, but they’re blunt instruments and often prevent employees from doing their jobs while also failing to prevent data loss from Insiders.  So, how can you detect incidents involving Insiders in order to prevent data loss and eliminate the cost of remediation? Machine learning. How does Tessian detect and prevent Insider Threats? Tessian turns an organization’s email data into its best defense against inbound and outbound email security threats. Powered by machine learning, our Human Layer Security technology understands human behavior and relationships, enabling it to automatically detect and prevent anomalous and dangerous activity. Tessian Enforcer detects and prevents data exfiltration attempts Tessian Guardian detects and prevents misdirected emails Tessian Defender detects and prevents spear phishing attacks Importantly, Tessian’s technology automatically updates its understanding of human behavior and evolving relationships through continuous analysis and learning of the organization’s email network. Oh, and it works silently in the background, meaning employees can do their jobs without security getting in the way.  Interested in learning more about how Tessian can help prevent Insider Threats in your organization? You can read some of our customer stories here or book a demo.
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